Successfully reported this slideshow.
Building Capacity for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice:       The Interprofessional Collaborative Learning SeriesC...
Overview Drivers for change Development of an IP-PD program: the IP-CLS Pilot Implementation and Evaluation Moving For...
Esther WincklerIn March 2000 Esther Winckler entered Chilliwack GeneralHospital for an elective hip surgery. A 77 year old...
Why Learning to Collaborate Matters?              “In health care a report of                2,000 critical incidents     ...
Drivers for ChangeOur healthcare system,rooted in a uni-disciplinary approach topractice, no longer meetsthe needs of our ...
Why Learning to Collaborate Matters?  Interprofessional  collaborative patient  centred practice offers a  practical frame...
IP-CLS Development                         Stakeholder                         involvement                                ...
IP-CLS GoalAdvance participants’ understanding and ability to  lead fellow colleagues in the art and science of working co...
The IP-CLS  Model             Train-the-Trainer
Strengths of the ModelPatient-Centred                                Context Relevant                      Facilitates Cha...
Pilot and Evaluation of the ModelSouthlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario (April 2009-May 2010)
Pilot Evaluation 35 clinical educators and practice leaders Professions: medicine, nursing, physical therapy, occupation...
Overall Findings The frequency with which participants felt they demonstrated each competency increased after their parti...
Specific Findings Prior to participation in the learning series, most participants felt they ‘almost always’ or ‘always’ ...
Specific Findings Only 50% of participants felt they  demonstrated competencies more specific  to interprofessional colla...
Specific Findings Skill based interprofessional competencies (role negotiation, conflict management, team facilitation,…)...
Program Findings Elements of the series that people particularly liked were:        The learning tools provided, which  ...
Conclusion Has the potential to build capacity for interprofessional collaborative practice Promotes interprofessional c...
Moving Forward IP-CLS content is being implemented in the health authorities across British Columbia, and there is ongoin...
www.chd.ubc.ca
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

B1 Rapid Fire: Engagement Through Collaboration - C. Newton, V. Wood and L. Nasmith

588 views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

B1 Rapid Fire: Engagement Through Collaboration - C. Newton, V. Wood and L. Nasmith

  1. 1. Building Capacity for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice: The Interprofessional Collaborative Learning SeriesChristie Newton; Victoria Wood; and Louise Nasmith
  2. 2. Overview Drivers for change Development of an IP-PD program: the IP-CLS Pilot Implementation and Evaluation Moving Forward
  3. 3. Esther WincklerIn March 2000 Esther Winckler entered Chilliwack GeneralHospital for an elective hip surgery. A 77 year oldgrandmother in good health except for osteoarthritis of thehip. She was on no medications and was considered anexcellent surgical candidate. She died three days postoperatively. The inquiry identified medical error through afailure of communication as the cause of untimely death.
  4. 4. Why Learning to Collaborate Matters? “In health care a report of 2,000 critical incidents showed that 70% to 80% of medical errors are due to interpersonal interaction issues” Williamson et al 1993
  5. 5. Drivers for ChangeOur healthcare system,rooted in a uni-disciplinary approach topractice, no longer meetsthe needs of our patients.The patients and thesystem have become toocomplex for ‘old’ practicepatterns to be effective.
  6. 6. Why Learning to Collaborate Matters? Interprofessional collaborative patient centred practice offers a practical framework within which the numerous health professions can interact with each other in order to provide the optimal quality of care.
  7. 7. IP-CLS Development Stakeholder involvement BC Competency Institute for Health Framework forImprovement Model for IP-CLS Interprofessional Improvement Collaboration Needs assessment findings
  8. 8. IP-CLS GoalAdvance participants’ understanding and ability to lead fellow colleagues in the art and science of working collaboratively for patient-centred care
  9. 9. The IP-CLS Model Train-the-Trainer
  10. 10. Strengths of the ModelPatient-Centred Context Relevant Facilitates Change Train-the-Trainer Approach
  11. 11. Pilot and Evaluation of the ModelSouthlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket, Ontario (April 2009-May 2010)
  12. 12. Pilot Evaluation 35 clinical educators and practice leaders Professions: medicine, nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, dietetics, pharmacy, audiology, speech language pathology, laboratory medicine, interventional radiology, and human kinetics Retrospective pre- and post-participation self-assessment  Asked to rate how often they felt they demonstrated the knowledge, skills and behaviours described in the BC competency framework using a 5-point Likert Scale Focus group explored:  What they found beneficial about the IP-CLS;  Suggestions for improvement;  Changes in themselves, their practices and within the organization that resulted from the learning series; and  The future of interprofessional collaborative practice across the organization.
  13. 13. Overall Findings The frequency with which participants felt they demonstrated each competency increased after their participation in the learning series.  Influenced by how often they felt they demonstrated each competency prior to participation
  14. 14. Specific Findings Prior to participation in the learning series, most participants felt they ‘almost always’ or ‘always’ demonstrated competencies related to general collaboration, which are also relevant to uni-disciplinary practice
  15. 15. Specific Findings Only 50% of participants felt they demonstrated competencies more specific to interprofessional collaboration ‘almost always’ or ‘always’ prior to participation After taking part in the learning series, 90% of participants felt they ‘almost always’ or always demonstrated these more specific competencies
  16. 16. Specific Findings Skill based interprofessional competencies (role negotiation, conflict management, team facilitation,…) improved in the post-test. However, not as much as the collaborative practice knowledge based competencies (role definitions, scopes of practice, patient-centred care).
  17. 17. Program Findings Elements of the series that people particularly liked were:  The learning tools provided, which they subsequently used with their colleagues and students;  The use of role plays and case scenarios to drive the learning; and  The session on shared decision- making.
  18. 18. Conclusion Has the potential to build capacity for interprofessional collaborative practice Promotes interprofessional competencies allowing participants to incorporate elements of interprofessional collaboration into practice Creates leaders for interprofessional collaborative practice that are able to model it to colleagues and students on placement and thereby serve as change agents within the practice context
  19. 19. Moving Forward IP-CLS content is being implemented in the health authorities across British Columbia, and there is ongoing evaluation. Challenges with the logistics of 7 sessions have resulted in modifying the delivery  IPC on the Run
  20. 20. www.chd.ubc.ca

×