Social Structure & Groups<br />
Social Structure<br />Social structure<br />Society is organized in a way that makes human behavior and relationships pred...
Social Structure<br />Status – as socially defined position that an individual occupies<br />Does not necessarily imply pr...
Social Structure<br />Ascribed status<br />Obtained involuntarily or without effort on the part of the individual<br />Ach...
Social Structure<br />Master status<br />A particular status that stands out among all others you occupy and shapes both h...
Social Structure<br />Roles – set of expectations and behaviors associated with your status in a given group or society<br...
Social Structure<br />Role ambiguity<br />When the expectations associated with a particular social status are unclear<br />
Social Structure<br />Role strain<br />Results from single role overload or from contradictory demands placed on a given s...
Social Structure<br />Role conflict<br />When the demands or expectations associated with two or more statuses interfere w...
Social Structure<br />Zimbardo’s prison experiment<br />Standford 1971<br />Prisoner’s and guards in a mock prison<br />Ev...
Social Groups<br />We are influenced by the groups we currently belong to and those we identify with, but also by those we...
Social Groups<br />Statistical groups<br />Formed not by the group members themselves but by sociologists and statistician...
Social Groups<br />Limited social groups<br />Interact minimally<br />Members are generally not concerned with the feeling...
Social Groups<br />Social groups<br />Involves some type of interaction, a sense of belonging, or membership, shared inter...
Social Groups<br />Primary groups<br />Small, informal groups of people who interact in a personal, direct and intimate wa...
Social Groups<br />Secondary groups<br />Groups whose members interact in an impersonal manner, have few emotional ties, a...
Social Groups<br />Dyad<br />Two people<br />Each has a responsibility to interact<br />Maintain individuality<br />Triad<...
Social Groups<br />In-group<br />Social category to which persons feel they belong and in which the members have a conscio...
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Structure and groups

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Structure and groups

  1. 1. Social Structure & Groups<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3. Social Structure<br />Social structure<br />Society is organized in a way that makes human behavior and relationships predictable<br />Human behavior is socially patterned<br />
  4. 4. Social Structure<br />Status – as socially defined position that an individual occupies<br />Does not necessarily imply prestige<br />
  5. 5. Social Structure<br />Ascribed status<br />Obtained involuntarily or without effort on the part of the individual<br />Achieved status<br />A status that you choose voluntarily or attain through effort or ability<br />
  6. 6. Social Structure<br />Master status<br />A particular status that stands out among all others you occupy and shapes both how you and other people view you<br />
  7. 7. Social Structure<br />Roles – set of expectations and behaviors associated with your status in a given group or society<br />Prescribed role – what society suggest we do<br />Role perception – individual’s understanding of their role<br />Role performance – what an individual actually does<br />
  8. 8. Social Structure<br />Role ambiguity<br />When the expectations associated with a particular social status are unclear<br />
  9. 9. Social Structure<br />Role strain<br />Results from single role overload or from contradictory demands placed on a given status<br />
  10. 10. Social Structure<br />Role conflict<br />When the demands or expectations associated with two or more statuses interfere with each other or are incompatible<br />Role confusion<br />Difficulty determining which role to play<br />
  11. 11. Social Structure<br />Zimbardo’s prison experiment<br />Standford 1971<br />Prisoner’s and guards in a mock prison<br />Even affected Zimbardo as the Prison Superintendent<br />Only lasted 6 days<br />
  12. 12.
  13. 13. Social Groups<br />We are influenced by the groups we currently belong to and those we identify with, but also by those we associated with in the past<br />Group – two or more people who have something in common<br />Definition is not universal<br />“Group” can be many things<br />
  14. 14. Social Groups<br />Statistical groups<br />Formed not by the group members themselves but by sociologists and statisticians<br />Categorical group<br />A number of people who share a common characteristic<br />
  15. 15. Social Groups<br />Limited social groups<br />Interact minimally<br />Members are generally not concerned with the feelings and attitudes of others<br />Aggregate – group consisting of a collection of people who are together in one place and socialize very little<br />Associational/organization – people who join together in some organized way to pursue a common interest<br />
  16. 16. Social Groups<br />Social groups<br />Involves some type of interaction, a sense of belonging, or membership, shared interests or agreements on values, norms and goals, and a structure (definable, recognizable arrangement of parts)<br />
  17. 17. Social Groups<br />Primary groups<br />Small, informal groups of people who interact in a personal, direct and intimate way<br />Most important thing in shaping our personality<br />Members are emotionally attached<br />“We”<br />
  18. 18. Social Groups<br />Secondary groups<br />Groups whose members interact in an impersonal manner, have few emotional ties, and come together for a specific practical purpose<br />Most of our time is spent in these groups<br />
  19. 19. Social Groups<br />Dyad<br />Two people<br />Each has a responsibility to interact<br />Maintain individuality<br />Triad<br />Three people<br />If one person drops out, the group can still survive<br />Threat of a dyad forming and isolating the third member<br />
  20. 20. Social Groups<br />In-group<br />Social category to which persons feel they belong and in which the members have a consciousness and awareness of kind<br />Out-groups<br />A group to which we feel we do not belong<br />“Us from them”<br />In-group stereotypes out-groups<br />Perceived threat from the out-group strengthens in-group solidarity<br />

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