Comms at the crossroads:
                What Telecoms and Computing Should Know
                About Each Other and How ...
meeting the immovable obstacle of the telecoms industry”. I intend to talk about
how Symbian Foundation, whom I am represe...
SOME OBSERVATIONS ON CONVERGENCE



               Some observations on convergence

                Intuitive:
          ...
Counter intuitively:


The computer world does not meet the needs of consumers.


       Consumers are forced to adapt to ...
The good, the bad and the ugly?
                            Telecoms                               Computing

            ...
However, this interestingly what is also happening in mobile telecoms are rapid
changes:


       Relentless hardware and ...
o Mean that you can spend more time building out functionality than
              worrying about
          o New systems a...
Not to force the point



                  Not to force the point…




                           The PC in 2002         ...
What we’re trying to do different



                  What we’re trying to do different

                               R...
Here you have a low power, efficient, robust, scalable, secure operating
system….. Already shipped in more than 250 millio...
Symbian foundation platform plan (open for contribution)



                 Symbian Foundation Platform Plan
            ...
Come and join us




                      Thank you. (Come and join us.) @
                             www.symbian.org

...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

What Telecoms And Computing Can Learn From Each Other Carney

396 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
396
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
9
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

What Telecoms And Computing Can Learn From Each Other Carney

  1. 1. Comms at the crossroads: What Telecoms and Computing Should Know About Each Other and How We Can Take the Best from Both Worlds. Bruce Carney, March 2009 Intuitively everyone in this room realises that the computer and telecoms world are converging. As personal example, I celebrated my sons birthday last Sunday and his 78 year old grandparents, in Australia, helped sing happy birthday and watch him blow out the candles on his cake using Skype on a Wi-Fi/Webcam enabled netbook. Even though it took me 30mins to set up using VNC to remotely access my fathers machine……That certainly is convergence at . Equally, I could have been video streaming via mobile phone using technology such as QIK and/or doing a video telephone call via the 3G network. Certainly for us early adopters we are all interchangeably talking, emailing, twittering and web surfing between our computer and smart phones. As we move to a world of “convergence”, and the “converged device”, there is a classic paradox at the play, the “unstoppable force of the computer industry Comms at the Crossroads: Bruce Carney & John Forsyth, March 2009 -1-
  2. 2. meeting the immovable obstacle of the telecoms industry”. I intend to talk about how Symbian Foundation, whom I am representing today will solve this paradox. Comms at the Crossroads: Bruce Carney & John Forsyth, March 2009 -2-
  3. 3. SOME OBSERVATIONS ON CONVERGENCE Some observations on convergence Intuitive: - The telecoms world is full of pre-historic traditions and control points. - The computing world is more open and innovative. Counter-intuitive: - Practices in the computing world won’t meet mobile consumer expectations. - The telecoms world knows how to reach further and wider. Thesis: - The computing and telecoms world are the way they are because that was the best adapted solution for their environment… - We’re entering a new environment. DNA from both will drive growth. Intuitively we view: The telecoms as being full of pre-historic traditions and control points. Massive multinational corporations, with implicitly high barriers to entry; slow moving and equally slow to adapt to change. The computing world is more open and innovative Countless garage developers have taken bright ideas, wrapped innovative business models around them and created multinational corporations delivering enormous value. In the computer industry nowadays there almost no barriers to entry and almost no incremental costs to scale…all the value is in the ideas and eyeballs. Comms at the Crossroads: Bruce Carney & John Forsyth, March 2009 -3-
  4. 4. Counter intuitively: The computer world does not meet the needs of consumers. Consumers are forced to adapt to learn computers and their idiosyncrasies. It is a one-size-fits-all approach and most non technical people I know are engaged in an ongoing fight to keep their computer operational. The telecoms world knows how to reach further and wider The telecoms industry has been able to address mass market consumers, simply. It is a tremendous challenge to simplify telecoms networks to the level that most people are completely oblivious to it’s operation. And by mass market I mean big, really big and diverse. As an example, I can pretty much roam anywhere in the world accessing data services and make/send receive calls, sending an SMS to anywhere else in the world, all the while why everything else is maintained in the background for me. All need to do is charge my phone and pay my bills. The thesis is that convergence is best understood as something where there’s a lot to learn from both sides. Each is actually well-adapted to its environment, but we are entering a new environment. The DNA from both is required to fuel the growth and will present the future opportunities Comms at the Crossroads: Bruce Carney & John Forsyth, March 2009 -4-
  5. 5. The good, the bad and the ugly? Telecoms Computing Walled gardens for applications Productive programming Walled gardens for applications Productive programming Network-by-network acceptance environments Network-by-network acceptance environments Ancient platforms Published interfaces Ancient platforms Published interfaces IP ‘fortresses’ Free and open standards IP ‘fortresses’ Free and open standards Device fragmentation Amazing pace of SW innovation Device fragmentation Amazing pace of SW innovation Lead times from hell Lead times from hell Relentless hardware innovation Relentless hardware innovation Power discipline Power discipline Consumers are our beta-testers Consumers are our beta-testers Built-in-billing Built-in-billing Lack of HW product choice Lack of HW product choice Consumer electronics Consumer electronics Complexity of SW distribution and Complexity of SW distribution and expectations expectations discovery discovery Products as fashion statements Products as fashion statements Highly segmented product Highly segmented product So now based on the origin-of-our-differing-species we can understand that certain reflexes, patterns and behaviours are inherent in how things are currently implemented. In telecoms Trust is essential as every action = a financial transaction, a call, an SMS, a data packet Thinking is naturally towards security, scalability safety. walled gardens made sense, protect consumers to maintain trust and simplicity (and revenue) Devices and anything from outside our network need to be tested/certified on a per network basis. And there are a lot of networks around the world. Backward/forward compatibility = although, a phone i bought in 1950 is still going to work on the fixed line network Simplicity: technology adapts to the person (the complexity of the network is managed and hidden) Robustness: i drop my mobile phone it survives (or for those following the news this week a phone was found in a fish and was still working?) Comms at the Crossroads: Bruce Carney & John Forsyth, March 2009 -5-
  6. 6. However, this interestingly what is also happening in mobile telecoms are rapid changes: Relentless hardware and mechanical engineering innovation, adding more cpus, radios, audio paths on a device. Orders of magnitude improvements in power usage to drive every nano- amp of battery life (to the point that an e71 has 10hours talk time and 17 days standby time) Differentiated products: age, gender, locale, interests, pricepoints…etc The mobile phone has become the “personal computer”, everything about it is personalised and it never more than a few feet away from it’s owner The good, the bad and the ugly? Telecoms Computing Walled gardens for applications Productive programming Walled gardens for applications Productive programming Network-by-network acceptance environments Network-by-network acceptance environments Ancient platforms Published interfaces Ancient platforms Published interfaces IP ‘fortresses’ Free and open standards IP ‘fortresses’ Free and open standards Device fragmentation Amazing pace of SW innovation Device fragmentation Amazing pace innovation Lead times from hell Lead times from hell Relentless hardware innovation Relentless hardware innovation Power discipline Power discipline Consumers are our beta-testers Consumers are beta-testers Built-in-billing Built-in-billing Lack of HW product choice Lack of HW product Consumer electronics Consumer electronics Complexity of SW distribution and Complexity of SW distribution and expectations expectations discovery discovery Products as fashion statements Products as fashion statements Highly segmented product Highly segmented product Equally, computers have been wonderful for enterprises and developers. Their evolution has been driven almost exclusively by the needs of these groups...as such There are multitude of programming environments, where there is the luxury of o Virtually infinite computational resources; o Always on power.. Comms at the Crossroads: Bruce Carney & John Forsyth, March 2009 -6-
  7. 7. o Mean that you can spend more time building out functionality than worrying about o New systems and functionality can be built and deployed fast. Interfaces are published and well documented Standards are actually standard!, becoming universally/globally adopted or at least they battle it out until one dominates and the rest follow. Openness fuels innovation. However, areas where computers haven’t been so great are Exposing users to viruses, spyware, phishing, fraud, spam, denial of service attacks…. Consumers feel like they are being used as beta testers. And in many cases they are!!! Sw distribution and discovery is complex and for many consumers they do not purchase, know about or in many cases are afraid to install apps. Comms at the Crossroads: Bruce Carney & John Forsyth, March 2009 -7-
  8. 8. Not to force the point Not to force the point… The PC in 2002 The PC in 2009 The phone in 2002 The phone in 2009 In reality, and especially viewed from the vantage of a mass market consumer. Most life changing innovation for this decade is occurring is actually in the mobile telecoms space. Comms at the Crossroads: Bruce Carney & John Forsyth, March 2009 -8-
  9. 9. What we’re trying to do different What we’re trying to do different Rich web runtime Designed as a platform for 3rd party apps Collaborative software development Community-led innovation Open devices, open networks Quality of product Diversity of product design Enable global, segmented product portfolios Clear long-term roadmaps Symbian was founded in 1998 and its founders set it with a vision to create an open operating system for mobile phones. Whilst the term “open” is becoming very much clichéd nowadays, One thing is certain symbian is battled hardened and has been at the center of this convergence; working at the center of with oems, carriersand developers to create an ecosystem to provide open mobile devices Then in a move that is best described as “if you love, something set it free” on the 10th anniversary, an industry changing announcement was made to open source symbian os and all user interfaces S60, UIQ and MOAP (in japan) …………….a billion dollar asset put into the public domain………… This game changing decision by symbian’s shareholders, to create the symbian foundation, provides the computer and telecom industry an environment to leverage each others strengths in a level playing field. Comms at the Crossroads: Bruce Carney & John Forsyth, March 2009 -9-
  10. 10. Here you have a low power, efficient, robust, scalable, secure operating system….. Already shipped in more than 250 million devices globally… Set free to drive grow faster… In short…… To accelerate innovation … By taking all the advantages of the development models from the computer industry whilst … Allowing the member community full access source code, o To influence the platform, o To competitively differentiate and segment o And lead innovation in their specialist areas. Quality, packaging and testing. Maintaining long term roadmaps for review and comment Including more common run time environments, such as webkit, but also supporting the further development of commercial and open source developer environments. Comms at the Crossroads: Bruce Carney & John Forsyth, March 2009 - 10 -
  11. 11. Symbian foundation platform plan (open for contribution) Symbian Foundation Platform Plan Open for contribution 2009 2010 2011 Symbian Foundation 1 Symbian Foundation 3 To be defined according to community process • Support for multiple form factors, resolutions and input methods • Customisable home screen supporting embedded widgets and other personal content SF1 SF2 SF3 Symbian Foundation 2 • Support for composition of hardware accelerated content seamlessly into UI • High performance communications architecture enabling fixed internet level of performance Available on “Day 1”: •SDK based on Forum Nokia SDK 5th Edition, compatible with Symbian OS v9.x and S60 5th Edition •Source code for SF1 release available to members With an reshaped vision, it remains non trivial to take a billion dollar asset and move into a new governance model, i will touch briefly on how we see this transitioning to the future To start with nothing changes, the current S60 5th edition on Symbian OS becomes the basis for future Symbian Foundation releases. The yellow arrow depicts the Symbian foundation Codeline and release ‘blobs’. The foundation intends to complete a release once every six 6 months and contributions are encouraged in all stages of all releases – For releases so called, SF1 and SF2- a few top line features are introduced to continue the momentum that Symbian platform already has, as well as to build a theme around each release. SF3 is left intentionally blank to highlight that that roadmap will actually created by the member community and that dialogue is about to start. Comms at the Crossroads: Bruce Carney & John Forsyth, March 2009 - 11 -
  12. 12. Come and join us Thank you. (Come and join us.) @ www.symbian.org Membership is now open as we ramp up for an operational launch later this half. Symbian foundation is a intended to be a meritocracy and this is a real opportunity to create the environment for telecoms and computer industries to work with each other, learn from each other and create the future of an internet without wires…the mobile internet. Thankyou for listening….more details on membership and the Symbian Foundation from www.symbian.org. Comms at the Crossroads: Bruce Carney & John Forsyth, March 2009 - 12 -

×