ECEP 233. Inclusion of Children with Special Needs. by Anhelina Butkevich

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ECEP 233. Inclusion of Children with Special Needs. by Anhelina Butkevich

  1. 1. Meeting the Needs of Children and Families. Anhelina Butkevich (300722926) sec. 061 Professor Lisa McCaie Centennial College 2014
  2. 2. • Analyzing Case Scenario • What is Epilepsy • Identifying special needs of children with epilepsy and developmental areas that might be affected • Physical Environment’s Adaptations • Adaptive Devices for Children with Epilepsy • Teaching Strategies • Helping Agencies • References Content
  3. 3. Zenna shows atypical development in many areas and was diagnosed with Epilepsy. Zenna’s family is overcoming difficult times, as her mother is pregnant and “is at risk of delivering the unborn baby prematurely.”(Meeting the Needs of Children with Special Needs, Case Studies, 2014) Zenna and her Family
  4. 4. Reference: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lntbtyQ7Wg&list=TLSz4qqKhSC7t7FCBiQXFiCg3etIm PrUZC The Lives of Children with Epilepsy. YouTube Video.
  5. 5. Epilepsy is a neurological condition that provoke seizures. It is an illness that affects the way brain works. Seizures happen for a few seconds to a few minutes. (If longer, we need to call emergency!) There is no cure to the illness and nothing can be done to prevent seizures. However, medication in most cases will reduce chances of a seizure to happen. References: ECEP 233, Class Notes, Week 3 http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org/ http://www.healthline.com/symptom/seizures Children and Epilepsy
  6. 6. 1. Petit mal Seizures – “brief, small lost of consciousness” (ECEP 233, Class Notes, Week 3) 2. Grand mal Seizures – “lose consciousness, violently jerking muscles, may stop breathing, bubble saliva, lose bladder control” (ECEP 233, Class Notes, Week 3) 3. Simple partial seizures – specific area of brain become affected. A child does not lose consciousness, but some parts of the body might be out of control (http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org/ ) Types of Seizures
  7. 7.  emotional stressors (worry, anxiety and anger)  fatigue  lack of sleep and rest  fever or other illness  flashing bright lights  not eating healthy or enough Reference: http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org/aboutepilepsy/Diagnosis/seizureprovokingtriggers.cfm What can trigger a seizure?
  8. 8. Individual needs of a child with epilepsy
  9. 9. 1. low self-esteem (they think they are “different”) 6. might have difficulties controlling aggressive behavior 2. stress, fear, anxiety 7. have difficulties to adapt to changes 3. problems with making friends 8. irritability 4. fatigue (the result of nighttime seizures) 9. “verbal or behavioural aggression may occur spontaneously with minimal or no provocation” (http://www.epilepsy.com/articles/ar_11307 70266) 5. sleepiness (side effects from taken medications) 10. hyperactivity Areas of development of a child with epilepsy that might be affected References: http://www.ehow.com/about_5548592_impact-epilepsy-childs-development.html, http://epilepsyontario.org/education/ Social/Emotional 1. low self-esteem (children might think they are “different”) 6. might have difficulties controlling aggressive behavior. “Verbal or behavioural aggression may occur spontaneously with minimal or no provocation.” (retrieved from http://www.epilepsy.com/articles/ar_1130770266 ) 2. stress, fear, anxiety 7. have difficulties to adapt to changes and transitions 3. problems with making friends 8. irritability 4. fatigue (the result of nighttime seizures) 9. hyperactivity 5. sleepiness (side effects from medications) References: http://www.ehow.com/about_5548592_impact- epilepsy-childs-development.html, http://epilepsyontario.org/education/
  10. 10. Cognitive development - problems with concentrating and paying attention - short memory loss - might have problems with organizational skills Reference: http://www.epilepsy.com/articles/ar_1130770266 Areas of development of a child with epilepsy that might be affected (cont’d)
  11. 11. Meeting the needs in the child care center
  12. 12. Physical Environment’s Adaptations. Physical space • For children with epilepsy that might have seizures in the day care the criteria of safe and spacious physical environment is one of the most important. The areas of the classroom must provide enough space for the children to play and learn. • Considering furniture arrangements indoors is important. Being mindful of physical space in case of seizure happens (no sharp surfaces) • “Safety can also be reinforced using stories and pictures” (Class Notes, Week 8) References: ECEP 233, Class Notes, Week 4, “Physical Adaptive Leaning Environments”
  13. 13. •Noise. As long as child with epilepsy might have difficulty with concentration, it is important to be mindful of setting up learning areas. Areas such as dramatic or music must be far from alone, literacy or math areas. References: ECEP 233, Class Notes, Week 4, “Physical Adaptive Leaning Environments” Physical Environment’s Adaptations. Physical space (cont’d)
  14. 14. • Books with representation of children with special needs (epilepsy). As to arrange inclusive environment, make a child feel comfortable within class and reduce fear among the children in case a child has a seizure, we need to educate children about epilepsy. Books can be read to children with a character who has epilepsy: 1) “Let’s Learn with Teddy about Epilepsy” by Yvonne Zelenka, Ph. D 2) “Lee the Rabbit with Epilepsy” by Deborah M. Moss 3) “Taking Seizure Disorders to School: A Story About Epilepsy” by Kim Gosselin JayJ (retrieved from http://www.epilepsynorcal.org/docs/ChildrensStorybooksaboutEpilepsy.pdf)) References: ECEP 233, Class Notes, Week 4, “Physical Adaptive Leaning Environments” http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org/ Physical Environment’s Adaptations. Materials
  15. 15. • “Visuals supports hold time and space, direct attention, allow more time to process information, help memory” (Class Notes, Week 8) • As long as children with epilepsy might experience problems with paying attention, concentration and memorizing, visuals will support and enhance their confidence, reduce anxiety. • “Picture schedules can also be helpful especially when there are changes” (Class Notes, Week 8) References: ECEP 233, Class Notes, Week 4, “Physical Adaptive Leaning Environments” Physical Environment’s Adaptations. Labeling System. Visuals
  16. 16. • Classroom labels. Labeling bins with materials and toys, areas of the classroom and activities will help children and “facilitate positive and safe play space, reduce chaos” (Reading Package, ECEP 233, 2014) • Photos with real objects on the bin will promote children organizational skills and confidence References: ECEP 233, Class Notes, Week 4, “Physical Adaptive Leaning Environments” Physical Environment’s Adaptations. Labeling System. Visuals
  17. 17. • Schedules help to maintain predictability of the routines and reduce children’s anxiety. Children with epilepsy might have short memory loss and displayed schedule will help them to follow the daily routines and know the sequence of the schedule. (Reading Package, ECEP 233, 2014) • Transitions should be smooth, provide children with time to finish their work and move to another daily routine. This will help to reduce their anxiety References: ECEP 233, Class Notes, Week 4, “Physical Adaptive Leaning Environments” Physical Environment’s Adaptations. Stability and Predictability
  18. 18. • Inclusion of children with special needs. Children with epilepsy should participate in the activities their peers participate in. • Being active is important for health and well-being of children. • “Safety is key” (ECEP 233, Class Notes, Week 3) (for example, wearing helmets when riding a bike) • Constant supervision (Children must be always monitored) • There should be traffic signs to indicate flows of traffic (Reading Package, ECEP 233) References: ECEP 233, Class Notes, Week 4, “Physical Adaptive Leaning Environments” Physical Environment’s Adaptations. Safety and Safe Risk Taking
  19. 19. •Collaboration with staff is essential to support children’s special needs. •All of the workers must be aware of child’s special need and first aid that must be conducted when child has a seizure. •Their must be training provided for helping child during seizure. •Keeping records of seizures (what condition/activity took place before the seizure happened) References: ECEP 233, Class Notes, Week 4, “Physical Adaptive Leaning Environments” Physical Environment’s Adaptations. Staff Support & Training. Communicating with parents of child with epilepsy.
  20. 20. •On-going documentation and observation is essential •Documentation of prescribed medicine when administrating •There also should be a private space where ECE can communicate with each other and parents. •Further communication with teachers and sharing knowledge of a child. References: ECEP 233, Class Notes, Week 4, “Physical Adaptive Leaning Environments” Physical Environment’s Adaptations. Staff Support & Training. Communicating with parents of child with epilepsy (cont’d)
  21. 21. Adaptive Devices for Children with Epilepsy Kurzweil 3000 Software •It is helping children that might have learning difficulties. •As children with epilepsy might experience short memory span and problems with concentration, the program will help with reading, highlighting parts of text, or reading text aloud. Reference: Class Notes, Week 8. “Adaptive Devices”
  22. 22. Adaptive Devices for Children with Epilepsy Seizure alert dogs •Trained dogs help children by alerting seizures. Before seizure occurs dogs behave in a certain way •They are also trained •to push a button and barking for a help References: Class Notes, Week 8. “Adaptive Devices” http://autismassistancedog.com/services-view/seizure-alert-dogs/
  23. 23. Adaptive Devices for Children with Epilepsy Fidget Kits. •Children with epilepsy might have difficulties in concentration and paying attention. Fidget kits will help them to stay focus, enhance their listening skills and self-regulate. References: Class Notes, Week 8. “Adaptive Devices”
  24. 24. • Children with epilepsy need enough time to process receiving information • It is important to “set realistic expectations” for a child • Communicating with a child at his/her level will help a child who has epilepsy to pay attention and stay focused. • Using praise is important to celebrate child’s success and increase child’s confidence References: Class Notes, Week 8. “Connectability. Giving Instructions” Giving Instructions and Communicating with children with epilepsy
  25. 25. Agencies and Resources helping children with epilepsy and their families
  26. 26. Epilepsy Toronto Contact Information Epilepsy Toronto 468 Queen St. East Suite 210 Toronto, ON M5A 1T7 Phone: (416) 964-9095 Fax: (416) 964-2492 E-mail: infoepilepsytoronto.org Website: www.epilepsytoronto.org •Epilepsy Toronto agency is advocating for children with epilepsy and their families. The agency is counseling parents about challenges their children might face, link to the medical help and professionals. The center provides resources to learn more about this health condition. They also work on the strategies to cope with epilepsy. •Epilepsy Toronto also organizes seminars for the community and this will be helpful for the educators to attend and better understand the needs of children with epilepsy. Reference: http://www.epilepsytoronto.org/aboutus_programsandservices.php
  27. 27. Sick Kids Centre for Brain and Mental Health Contact Information The Hospital for Sick Children 555 University Avenue Toronto, Ontario Canada M5G 1X8 General inquiries: 416-813-1500 Patient information/locating: 416-813-6621 Reference:http://www.sickkids.ca/AboutSi ckKids/Contact-Us/index.html • Centre for Brain and Mental Health offers medical help for children with epilepsy. The department also offers classrooms for children with epilepsy. The professionals take into consideration children’s special needs and plan their programs accordingly. • For a participation parents are required to receive a referral from a medical professional or teacher. There is also family support. (http://www.sickkids.ca/programsandservices/epi lepsy-classroom/index.html )
  28. 28. •Respite Services Agency offers help by providing care of the family member with special needs giving time for respite. The agency states: “Taking a break and experiencing life away from the family can be a great confidence booster for both your loved one and for yourself” (http://www.respiteservices.com/Toronto) •The help that agency provides is valuable, as parents of a child with epilepsy sometimes need a care provider to take care of their child in times they have to be away from home and need to leave a child at home. Contact Information: 112 Merton St Toronto, M4S 2Z8 Toronto phone: (416) 322-6317 x1 http://www.respiteservices.com/Toronto/ Reference: http://www.respiteservices.com/Toronto Respite Services
  29. 29. Toronto Central CCAC provides nursing support for someone who needs to be taken care of. In terms of Zenna’s family situation and mother’s difficult pregnancy, the support will be very helpful. They also link their clients to community resources. (http://healthcareathome.ca/torontocentral/en/Who-We- Are/Vision-Mission-and-Values) Contact Information: 250 Dundas Street West, Suite 305 Toronto, Ontario M5T 2Z5 Phone: 416-506-9888 Toll free: 1-866-243-0061 Fax: 416-506-0374 Reference: https://healthcareathome.ca/torontocentral/ Toronto central​ Community Care Access Centre
  30. 30. References McCaie, Lisa. 2014. Class Notes, ECEP 233. Reading Package, ECEP 233, 2014 http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org/ http://www.healthline.com/symptom/seizures http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org/aboutepilepsy/Diagnosis/seizureprovokingtriggers.cfm http://www.epilepsyfoundation.org/aboutepilepsy/Diagnosis/seizureprovokingtriggers.cfm http://epilepsyontario.org/education/ http://www.epilepsy.com/articles/ar_1130770266 https://healthcareathome.ca/torontocentral/ http://www.respiteservices.com/Toronto http://www.sickkids.ca/AboutSickKids/Contact-Us/index.html http://www.epilepsytoronto.org/aboutus_programsandservices.php
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