The Celebration Of Difference With Change And Continuity

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The event was India Day and the presentation was on the multiplicity of our culture. (March 26, 2009)

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The Celebration Of Difference With Change And Continuity

  1. 1. The Celebration of Difference through Continuity and Change<br />
  2. 2. The Broad Canvas<br />India boasts of a 7,000 year (approximately) civilization which goes to proto-historic era of Indus Valley Civilization.<br />India has a population of 1.2 Billion(aprox) people who speak various languages, profess different religions and are different in ethnicity, food habit and culture.<br />India has a tiered economy as well, if the “I” of India stands for IT the “A” at the end would be for Agriculture.<br />
  3. 3. Where do we draw our Festivals from?<br />Rooted in Ecological- Agrarian tradition (similar to the Gaia tradition of Ancient Greece), folk-lores, mysticism. These festivals are seasonal, attuned with nature and worship the soil and water (mainly the Ganges).<br /> (Hindu Popular Culture)<br />2. Rooted in our two Epics, Mythologies, (Puranas), The Vedic scriptures. <br /> (Hindu High Culture)<br />
  4. 4. Sankranti: Festival of Harvests<br />
  5. 5. KhumbMela (Pitcher Fair)<br />
  6. 6. Deepawali<br />The Festival of Light (Source, The Epic , The Ramayana)<br />Hindu Festival celebrating with fireworks, lights.<br />It has different meaning and connotation and also way of celebrating in different parts of the country.<br />
  7. 7. ThecelebrationofColours<br />ThecelebrationofColours (Source: The Epic, The Mahabharata, Mythology of Lord Krishna)<br />Celebrated in Spring.<br />Social significance: The otherwise strict caste rules are relaxed.<br />The purpose of celebrating Holi is to celebrate love, fraternity and the positive Karma that is innate in all individual.<br />
  8. 8. Holi<br />The Riot of Colours (Source: The Epic, The Mahabharata, Mythology of Lord Krishna)<br />Celebrated in Spring.<br />Social significance: The otherwise strict caste rules are relaxed.<br />The purpose of celebrating Holi is to celebrate love, fraternity and the positive Karma that is innate in all individual.<br />
  9. 9. Eid<br />The Muslims celebrate Eid twice a year, Eid-ul-Fitr and the other, which comes about 10 weeks later, is called Eid-ul-Adha.<br />(Around 18% Indian people, profess Islam)<br />
  10. 10. EID<br />The Muslims celebrate Eid twice a year, Eid-ul-Fitr and the other, which comes about 10 weeks later, is called Eid-ul-Adha.<br />(Around 18% Indian people, profess Islam)<br />
  11. 11. Carnival of Goa<br />Goa, an erstwhile Portuguese colony, was added to India on 1965 as a Union Territory and later as a state.<br />
  12. 12. Christmas (and New Year)<br />Christmas is a very big event in India, surprising so, as only 2% of Indian people profess Christianity.<br />Like every other religious festivities, Christmas also has transcended religious boundaries and December, 25 is marked in everybody’s calendar as a day filled with fun, cakes and outings....Indian winter being lovely as it is, makes it even better.<br />
  13. 13. Christmas (and New Year)<br />
  14. 14. How do we deal with so much difference?<br />The anthropological reason: Syncretism<br />Political reason: Secular state<br />Multiplicity is an Indian trait.<br />
  15. 15. The change and Contuinity<br />
  16. 16. Corporatisation of festivals<br />
  17. 17. Since the Indus valley....<br />The mother –cult, phallic worship, worshipping agents of nature still continues.....<br />
  18. 18. So finally...<br />Yes India is changing but it is not of touch with its roots.<br />We choose our change...we apply “politics” of choice.<br />Change has never been external ....it may have come from external forces but we have always internalised it. <br />

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