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Georgia Division of Family and
Children Services
Interim Director
Bobby Cagle
Georgia Division of Family and
Children Serv...
Division of Family and
Children Services
Safety Permanency Wellbeing
Community
Programs Unit
Organizational Service Struct...
DFCS Community Programs Unit
Mission: The mission of the Georgia Division of Family and
Children Services (DFCS) Community...
DFCS Community Programs
• Supports youth (ages 16-17) by providing career
preparation skills and valuable work experience
...
Who do we serve?
DFCS Community Programs serves at-risk youth.
Youth Who Are:
• Currently or previously in foster care
• Within low income families
• Within families receiving DFCS serv...
DFCS Well-Being Outcomes
WB1: Families have enhanced capacity to provide
for their children’s needs
WB3: Children receive ...
DFCS
Community Programs Unit
Programs and Services
Georgia Division of Family and
Children Services
Interim Director
Bobby Cagle
Georgia TeenWork Internship Program
Mandates For Our Work
Part A of the Social Security Act — BLOCK GRANTS TO STATES FOR TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY
FAMILI...
Georgia TeenWork Internship Program
Program Overview
Each year, more than 700 teens in Georgia age out of foster care. Man...
Program Goals
The program’s three core areas of the work include career preparation, job placement, and youth
employment r...
TeenWork Core Areas of Services
Youth will learn the importance of work through GTIP’s employment skills training. With on...
Job Readiness
Often referred to as “soft skills”, youth must learn non-technical
workplace competencies, including “proble...
Georgia TeenWork Internship Program
Youth Employment and Career Training Areas
 Dress for Success
 Employer Expectations...
Georgia TeenWork Internship Program
Employment
There are three employment cycles that youth can participate
within as a GT...
YCC Regional Assignments
(2) YCC’s for Regions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7
(2) YCC’s for Regions 13, 14 , 15
(2) YCC’s for Regions 6,...
GTIP Youth Age Groups
TeenWork Annual Program Statistics
2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005
Jobs Pledged 700 600 850 2,134 1,060 871 8...
GTIP Jobs Pledged vs. Youth Employed
TeenWork Community Partners
• DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION : YOUTH APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM
• DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
• DEPARTMENT OF...
Georgia TeenWork Internship Program
Contact
For additional information about the Georgia TeenWork Internship Program
and t...
Georgia Division of Family and
Children Services
Interim Director
Bobby Cagle
Educational Programming, Assessment and
Cons...
Educational Programming, Assessment, and Consultation
DHS Policy 10.13 – Education Stability
• Practice guidance to direct...
Education Programming, Assessment, and Consultation (EPAC)
Program Goals
• Improve academic success for all school aged yo...
EPAC Referral Process
Referrals
Assessments
Educational
Records
DFCS EPAC
Action Plan
Delivery of
Services
Resource
Manage...
EPAC Referral (Form No.
176)
Education Support Monitors
• 15 regionally assigned
Education Support
Monitors (ESM)
– Provide direct
educational support ...
State Office Personnel
Program Manager Kyle D. Berry 404-657-5122
Asst. Program Manager Jennifer Williams 404-576-7598
Dat...
EPAC Services Provided
• Assessment in Progress – Youth who have received educational diagnostic
assessments through EPAC ...
EPAC Service Statistics
5,568 School-Aged
Youth in DFCS Care
2,674 School-Aged Youth Served by EPAC
Service Status Number
...
Partnership Between
DFCS and GaDOE
Memorandum of Understanding
Through Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), DFCS has
access to certain educational records thro...
• Measures progress of DFCS Well-Being
Outcome 2
• Provides accountability for DFCS staff
responsible for the well-being o...
Why is the GaDOE-DFCS Partnership important?
Diagnostic
Assessments
SLDS
Records
Education
Action
Plan
SHINES (State Agenc...
GaDOE - SLDS
Demographics
Attendance records
State assessments
Current schedule
Enrollment history
Unofficial transcripts
...
Education Action Plan
Components of an EAP
• Student Information
• Case Manager Information
• Education Specialist Informa...
Future Goals
• Improve engagement between DFCS and GaDOE
• Data-driven decision making
• Streamline data reporting and man...
Educational Programming Assessment and Consultation
Contact
For additional information about Educational Programming, Asse...
Georgia Division of Family and
Children Services
Interim Director
Bobby Cagle
DFCS Afterschool Care Program
Current Afterschool Statistics
The hours between
3 p.m. and 6 p.m.
are the peak hours for
juvenile crime and
experimentati...
Current Afterschool Statistics
• More than 15 million school-age children (26
percent) are on their own after school. Amon...
DFCS Afterschool Care Program
The Afterschool Care Program is located within the Georgia
Department of Human Services (DHS...
DFCS Afterschool Care Program
Mission
To provide resources to youth-serving organizations
within the state of Georgia who ...
Goals
• Strengthen youth-serving organizations and institutions by providing funding
that increases their capacity to desi...
DFCS Afterschool Care Program
By funding youth development services that are provided during
before school, after school, ...
DFCS Afterschool Care Program
Funded Programs Provide:
1. Apprenticeship Opportunities (high school youth)
2. Project-base...
Youth in Funded
Programs are1:
SAFE
HEALTHY
EDUCATED
EMPLOYABLE
CONNECTED
Graduation from a post secondary institution or ...
DFCS Afterschool Care Program
Federal Fiscal Year 2013
Total Number of Counties Served 74
Number of Funded Afterschool Pro...
DFCS Afterschool Care Program
Federal Fiscal Year 2014
Total Number of Counties Served 69
Number of Funded Afterschool Pro...
Connecting Youth to Programs
Homeless Liaisons and
representatives from the
Department of Juvenile
Justice are able to mak...
Afterschool Care Program
Contact
For additional information about Afterschool Care Program and to find out
how youth in yo...
Georgia Division of Family and
Children Services
Interim Director
Bobby Cagle
Georgia’s Personal Responsibility
Education ...
What is PREP?
On March 23, 2010
President Obama Signed the Affordable Health Care Act
The purpose of the federally funded ...
Where is PREP Funded?
Georgia’s PREP Initiative
Mission
To provide evidence-based programming to high priority youth ages
10-19 in an effort to ...
Overview of GA-PREP
Target
Populations
Foster Youth, Homeless Youth,
Youth involved in Juvenile Justice,
LGBTQ, Pregnant a...
• Department of Public Health
– Foster Youth
– Department of Juvenile Justice Youth
• Community Based Organizations
GA-PRE...
What have we learned from youth?
37% of surveyed PREP participants report having
had sexual intercourse
30% of surveyed ...
Celebrating Success
60% of participants were more likely to abstain from
sexual intercourse in the next year
74% of part...
At exit, surveyed PREP participants
reported they were more likely to:
 Care about doing well in school (63%)
 Continue ...
• Georgia’s Personal Responsibility Education Program (GA-PREP) is pleased to host a
series of 1-daytrainings designed to ...
Personal Responsibility Education Program
Contact
For additional information about the Personal Responsibility Education
P...
DFCS Community Programs
Contact
For additional information about the DFCS Community Programs Unit:
Carmen C. Callaway
Dire...
GA DFCS Community Programs Unit
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GA DFCS Community Programs Unit

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Community Programs available to foster youth from the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services. Georgia TeenWork Internship Program, Personal Responsibility Education Program, Afterschool Care Program, and Educational Programming, Assessment and Consultation. Presented by Carmen Callaway.

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GA DFCS Community Programs Unit

  1. 1. Georgia Division of Family and Children Services Interim Director Bobby Cagle Georgia Division of Family and Children Services DFCS Community Programs Unit Supporting Youth Through Community-Based Partnerships and Programs Georgia TeenWork Internship Program Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) Educational Programming, Assessment and Consultation (EPAC) Afterschool Care Program
  2. 2. Division of Family and Children Services Safety Permanency Wellbeing Community Programs Unit Organizational Service Structure
  3. 3. DFCS Community Programs Unit Mission: The mission of the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services (DFCS) Community Programs Unit is to provide resources and support to youth through coordinated community partnerships that promote positive youth development, academic achievement, self sufficiency and a healthy transition into young adulthood. Vision: The vision of the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services (DFCS) Community Programs Unit is for every youth to have access to and participate in positive youth development services that support their well-being. 3
  4. 4. DFCS Community Programs • Supports youth (ages 16-17) by providing career preparation skills and valuable work experience Georgia TeenWork Internship Program • Supports youth (ages 10-19) by providing comprehensive health education and adult preparation training Personal Responsibility Education Program • Supports youth (ages 5-17) and families through out- of-school time services and initiatives Afterschool Care Program • Provides diagnostic educational assessments, tutorial services and community-based educational support to youth in foster care (ages 5-17) Educational Programming, Assessment and Consultation
  5. 5. Who do we serve? DFCS Community Programs serves at-risk youth.
  6. 6. Youth Who Are: • Currently or previously in foster care • Within low income families • Within families receiving DFCS services • Performing poorly in school (low attendance, poor grades, etc.) • Pregnant and/or parenting • Using or have used drugs and/or alcohol • Homeless Who do we mean when we say at-risk youth?
  7. 7. DFCS Well-Being Outcomes WB1: Families have enhanced capacity to provide for their children’s needs WB3: Children receive adequate services to meet their physical and mental health needs WB2: Children receive appropriate services to meet their educational needs
  8. 8. DFCS Community Programs Unit Programs and Services
  9. 9. Georgia Division of Family and Children Services Interim Director Bobby Cagle Georgia TeenWork Internship Program
  10. 10. Mandates For Our Work Part A of the Social Security Act — BLOCK GRANTS TO STATES FOR TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE FOR NEEDY FAMILIES PURPOSE: Sec. 401. [42 U.S.C. 601] (a) In General -the purpose of this part is to increase the flexibility of States in operating a program designed to: • Provide assistance to needy families so that children may be cared for in their own homes or in the homes of relatives; • End the dependence of needy parents on government benefits by promoting job preparation, work, and marriage; • Prevent and reduce the incidence of out-of-wedlock pregnancies and establish annual numerical goals for preventing and reducing the incidence of these pregnancies; • Encourage the formation and maintenance of two-parent families. • No Individual Entitlement: this part shall not be interpreted to entitle any individual or family to assistance under any State program funded under this part. Youth Eligibility • Foster youth must reside in the state of Georgia with a valid photo ID, 15 to 17 years old by June 1st, and/or participate in the State of Georgia Independent Living Program.
  11. 11. Georgia TeenWork Internship Program Program Overview Each year, more than 700 teens in Georgia age out of foster care. Many of these youth experience negative outcomes such as homelessness, teenage pregnancy, and low academic achievement. Despite these discouraging statistics, studies have found that youth who have employment opportunities and enriching experiences while in foster care are more likely to finish high school, maintain steady employment, and become self-sufficient after exiting care. To support youth as they prepare to transition to adulthood and independence, The Georgia TeenWork Internship Program was created. GTIP is administered through the Georgia Department of Human Services (DHS), Division of Family and Children Services (DFCS) and is designed to ensure that Georgia's foster youth are equipped with the skills and opportunities necessary to enable them to mature into well-balanced and self-sufficient members of society.
  12. 12. Program Goals The program’s three core areas of the work include career preparation, job placement, and youth employment resource connections. GTIP continues to train youth in foster care with career preparatory knowledge across the entire state to equip them with workplace skills. The GTIP is an opportunity for Georgia's youth in foster care ages 15 - 17 years of age, to participate in valuable career preparatory opportunities within their communities. The program provides valuable training and job placement opportunities through partnerships with local businesses, non-profit organizations and public agencies. Below are the three program goals for the Georgia TeenWork Internship Program. • 1. Provide youth in foster care with career preparatory training. • 2. Provide youth in foster care with meaningful workplace skills and internship opportunities. • 3. Engage Georgia’s business communities, non-profit organizations and governmental agencies in a mutually beneficial collaborative partnerships and coordinated collaboration with internal and external partners that establishes valuable and safe work environments for GTIP participants.
  13. 13. TeenWork Core Areas of Services Youth will learn the importance of work through GTIP’s employment skills training. With one-on-one coaching participants will complete a career assessment and go through work readiness training. • Job Placement: The program is designed to ensure Georgia’s foster youth are equipped with the tools and opportunities necessary to enable them to mature into well balanced, healthy, and productive members of society. Youth are able to have hands on experience with companies to develop the skills needed in today’s workplace. The youth’s career assessment will help connect them to the right employer. Youth will be matched to assigned employers based on the needs of the employer and future career interest of the youth. • Employment Skills Training: Employment skills training provide GTIP youth with the knowledge to work effectively in the workplace. The training topics include such subjects as resume writing, dress for success, customer service skills, and a host of other employment skills. • Youth Resources Connections: The Georgia TeenWork Internship Program is a resource established to help promote positive youth development. The program strives to provide a sense of independence and valuable work experience for participating youth. Through statewide collaborations the program promotes future success for Georgia’s foster youth by providing a resource guide to connect youth to services they may need which GTIP does not offer.
  14. 14. Job Readiness Often referred to as “soft skills”, youth must learn non-technical workplace competencies, including “problem-solving and other cognitive skills, oral communication skills, personal qualities, work ethics, interpersonal and teamwork skills.”
  15. 15. Georgia TeenWork Internship Program Youth Employment and Career Training Areas  Dress for Success  Employer Expectations  First Impressions  Work Ethics  Job Retention  First Day Success  Interview Tips  Resume Building  Disciplinary Policies  Financial Literacy  Employment Application Completion
  16. 16. Georgia TeenWork Internship Program Employment There are three employment cycles that youth can participate within as a GTIP participant: During the employment cycles, youth work an average of 25 hours per week and earn an hourly wage. Cycle 1 – December (Holiday Break: 1 - 2 weeks) Cycle 2 – March/April (Spring Break: 1 week) Cycle 3 – Summer (June – July: 8 weeks)
  17. 17. YCC Regional Assignments (2) YCC’s for Regions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 (2) YCC’s for Regions 13, 14 , 15 (2) YCC’s for Regions 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 * 3 part time YCC’s will come on-board for the summer TeenWork provides career development and employment opportunities for the State of Georgia. There are (2) YCC’s in North Georgia, Metro – Atlanta area and South Georgia.
  18. 18. GTIP Youth Age Groups
  19. 19. TeenWork Annual Program Statistics 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Jobs Pledged 700 600 850 2,134 1,060 871 867 756 581 Applicants 655 1,072 1,725 55,838 1,374 1,037 810 - - Employed Youth 605 529 500 5,000 709 654 603 606 418 Completed 465 483 4,302 686 609 448 - - Terminated, Quit, No show 64 17 698 23 45 155 - - Hourly rate $7.25 $7.25 $7.25 $8.50 $7.00/$7.25 $6.50 $6.50 $5.50 $5.50
  20. 20. GTIP Jobs Pledged vs. Youth Employed
  21. 21. TeenWork Community Partners • DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION : YOUTH APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM • DEPARTMENT OF LABOR • DEPARTMENT OF DRIVER SERVICES • GEORGIA VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AGENCY • GEORGIA FAMILY CONNECTION PARTNERSHIP • GOODWILL • GEORGIA YOUTH ENTREPRENEURSHIP & MENTORING PROGRAM • JOB CORPS • TEEN MAZE • URBAN LEAGUE OF GREATER ATLANTA • DHS AFTERSCHOOL CARE PROGRAM • DHS PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY EDUCATION PROGRAM (PREP) • DHS EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING, ASSESSMENT AND CONSULTATION • DHS INDEPENDENT LIVING PROGRAM
  22. 22. Georgia TeenWork Internship Program Contact For additional information about the Georgia TeenWork Internship Program and to find out how youth can apply, you may contact: Crystal Culver, Program Manager Crystal.culver@dhs.ga.gov 404-657-4719
  23. 23. Georgia Division of Family and Children Services Interim Director Bobby Cagle Educational Programming, Assessment and Consultation (EPAC)
  24. 24. Educational Programming, Assessment, and Consultation DHS Policy 10.13 – Education Stability • Practice guidance to direct service workers and all other field staff about Education Stability for children and youth in foster care • This policy specifically covers how EPAC, through its Education Support Monitors, engage case managers and provide educational consultation in the following areas: o Collaborations with Local Educational Agencies (LEAs) o Determination of Appropriateness of Educational Settings o DFCS contact for District Level Homeless Liaisons o Assist in development of RTI, IEP, and/or 504 Plans o Homeless and Unaccompanied Youth Referrals o Educational Stability Transportation Funding Request Protocol
  25. 25. Education Programming, Assessment, and Consultation (EPAC) Program Goals • Improve academic success for all school aged youth in the custody of GA DFCS • Improve school stability for all school aged youth in the custody of GA DFCS • Provide the following services to children in custody of GA DFCS: diagnostic educational assessments, connection to community educational resources, tutoring, and consultation services • Annual promotion, graduation, or GED attainment for all school aged youth in custody of GA DFCS
  26. 26. EPAC Referral Process Referrals Assessments Educational Records DFCS EPAC Action Plan Delivery of Services Resource Management Reevaluation of Educational Need
  27. 27. EPAC Referral (Form No. 176)
  28. 28. Education Support Monitors • 15 regionally assigned Education Support Monitors (ESM) – Provide direct educational support to school aged youth in care – Serve as liaisons between local education agencies, community resources and DFCS Regions 3 and 14 have two Education Support Monitors respectively. Regions (1 & 2), (5 & 7) and (6 & 9) are represented by one Education Support Monitor.
  29. 29. State Office Personnel Program Manager Kyle D. Berry 404-657-5122 Asst. Program Manager Jennifer Williams 404-576-7598 Data Manager Nesha Jairam 404-657-5156 Education Quality Monitor Vacant 404-657-0088 Education Support Monitors Reg. 1, 2 Marilyn Peters Reg. 3W Christopher Jones Reg. 3E Michele Lobdell Reg. 4 Autumn Shepard Reg. 5, 7 Robin Brooks Reg. 6, 9 LeAnne Worley Reg. 8 Angela Thompson Reg. 10 Amie Henry Reg. 11 Mary Mollay Reg. 12 Vacant Reg. 13 Brandi Blackmon Reg. 14 (A-L) Josette Franklin Reg. 14 (M-Z) Shantel Tate Reg. 15 Jenny Summerlin Organizational Structure
  30. 30. EPAC Services Provided • Assessment in Progress – Youth who have received educational diagnostic assessments through EPAC for this month. The results of those assessments have been forwarded to the youth’s case manager and additional information may have been requested in order to write an Educational Action Plan (EAP) • Consultative Community Services – Youth who are receiving services from a community partner o Child Caring Institutions o Community-Based Programs o Local Educational Agencies • Tutoring – Youth who are receiving tutorial services with EPAC. Tutorial services are provided by an EPAC Education Specialist (ES), who is a contracted certified teacher • On Grade Level – Youth who are achieving on grade level, and are being monitored for educational progress changes • EAP’s Uploaded into SHINES – Percentage of EAP’s uploaded into SHINES for all open cases in care
  31. 31. EPAC Service Statistics 5,568 School-Aged Youth in DFCS Care 2,674 School-Aged Youth Served by EPAC Service Status Number Served Consultative Community Services 868 Tutoring 494 On Grade Level 694 Assessment in Progress 195 Total EAP’s Uploaded 95% Capture Rate 48.02% Note: Capture Rate is contingent upon referral from DFCS Field Staff.
  32. 32. Partnership Between DFCS and GaDOE
  33. 33. Memorandum of Understanding Through Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), DFCS has access to certain educational records through the Statewide Longitudinal Data System (SLDS): • Demographics • Attendance records • State assessments • Current schedule • Enrollment history • Unofficial transcripts • Indicator for students with disabilities
  34. 34. • Measures progress of DFCS Well-Being Outcome 2 • Provides accountability for DFCS staff responsible for the well-being of youth in foster care • Serves as baseline for academic progress monitoring Why is the GaDOE-DFCS Partnership important?
  35. 35. Why is the GaDOE-DFCS Partnership important? Diagnostic Assessments SLDS Records Education Action Plan SHINES (State Agency Child Welfare Information System)
  36. 36. GaDOE - SLDS Demographics Attendance records State assessments Current schedule Enrollment history Unofficial transcripts Indicator for Students with Disabilities DFCS SHINES Demographics Identifiers Placement Information Education Detail Page External Documentation EPAC Education Action Plan Resource Allocation Academic Progress Monitoring Systematic Integration
  37. 37. Education Action Plan Components of an EAP • Student Information • Case Manager Information • Education Specialist Information • Education Support Monitor Information • Assessment Results • Level of Intensity • EPAC Actions Taken on Behalf of Youth
  38. 38. Future Goals • Improve engagement between DFCS and GaDOE • Data-driven decision making • Streamline data reporting and management within DFCS • Assess academic outcomes of youth receiving services through the Community Programs Unit
  39. 39. Educational Programming Assessment and Consultation Contact For additional information about Educational Programming, Assessment and Consultation, and to find out how youth in your area can participate, you may contact: Kyle Berry, Program Manager Kyle.berry@dhs.ga.gov 404-657-5122
  40. 40. Georgia Division of Family and Children Services Interim Director Bobby Cagle DFCS Afterschool Care Program
  41. 41. Current Afterschool Statistics The hours between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. are the peak hours for juvenile crime and experimentation with drugs, alcohol, cigarettes and sex. (Fight Crime: Invest in Kids, 2002)
  42. 42. Current Afterschool Statistics • More than 15 million school-age children (26 percent) are on their own after school. Among them are more than 1 million are in grades K through 5. (Afterschool Alliance, 2009) • More than 27 million parents of school-age children are employed, including 23 million who work full time. (U.S. Department of Labor, 2010) Information retrieved from the Afterschool Alliance, www.afterschoolalliance.org.
  43. 43. DFCS Afterschool Care Program The Afterschool Care Program is located within the Georgia Department of Human Services (DHS), Division of Family and Children Services (DFCS), Community Programs Unit. The program provides federal funding to non-profit organizations and public agencies who serve youth and families during the out-of-school time and is designed to support DHS’ broader goal of promoting self-sufficiency among families and ending intergenerational poverty.
  44. 44. DFCS Afterschool Care Program Mission To provide resources to youth-serving organizations within the state of Georgia who serve families within low to- moderate income communities and the foster care system. Vision To ensure every child and youth has access to high quality youth development programming within their community.
  45. 45. Goals • Strengthen youth-serving organizations and institutions by providing funding that increases their capacity to design, implement, and sustain quality youth development programs and services; • Provide opportunities for youth to establish positive relationships with their peers and caring adults during traditional non-school day hours; and • Provide technical assistance to organizations and agencies as they implement services and activities that support their youth’s overall well-being as they prepare for and transition into young adulthood. DFCS Afterschool Care Program
  46. 46. DFCS Afterschool Care Program By funding youth development services that are provided during before school, after school, intercession and summer, the Afterschool Care Program also supports two Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) goals: (a) Reduce the dependency of needy parents by promoting job preparation, work and marriage; and (b) Prevent and reduce unplanned pregnancies among single young adults.
  47. 47. DFCS Afterschool Care Program Funded Programs Provide: 1. Apprenticeship Opportunities (high school youth) 2. Project-based Learning Opportunities (elementary and middle youth) 3. Well-being and Enrichment Activities (all youth)
  48. 48. Youth in Funded Programs are1: SAFE HEALTHY EDUCATED EMPLOYABLE CONNECTED Graduation from a post secondary institution or employment (livable wage) Healthy and safe relationships Community service Active participation in community LONG TERM RESULTS FOR YOUTH IN FUNDED AFTERSCHOOL AND SUMMER PROGRAMS DHS DFCS Afterschool Care Program Framework of Service Achieve and Maintain Good Grades ∙ Increased High School Graduation Rate ∙ Increased Engagement in Learning SHORT TERM RESULTS FOR YOUTH IN FUNDED AFTERSCHOOL AND SUMMER PROGRAMS Provide Funding to Afterschool and Summer Programs that serve youth in low-to- moderate communities. Provide technical assistance to funded programs that assist in program quality improvement and funding compliance. Provide resources for additional internal and external funding and professional development opportunities that improve program quality. Created by the DHS Afterschool Services – Updated 7/27/09 Ensure primary components of programs include academic enrichment activities, health education, physical activity and teen employment opportunities. 1 Format adopted from Voices for Georgia’s Children and Ready by 21™: Karen Pittman, Founder of the Forum for Youth Investment, www.forumforyouthinvestment.org
  49. 49. DFCS Afterschool Care Program Federal Fiscal Year 2013 Total Number of Counties Served 74 Number of Funded Afterschool Providers Community Based Organizations: 41 Schools/Public Agencies: 19 Total: 60 Total Number of Afterschool Provider Sites Community Based Organizations: 285 Schools/Public Agencies: 68 Total: 353
  50. 50. DFCS Afterschool Care Program Federal Fiscal Year 2014 Total Number of Counties Served 69 Number of Funded Afterschool Providers Community Based Organizations: 32 Schools/Public Agencies: 9 Total: 41 Total Number of Afterschool Provider Sites Community Based Organizations: 229 Schools/Public Agencies: 34 Total: 263
  51. 51. Connecting Youth to Programs Homeless Liaisons and representatives from the Department of Juvenile Justice are able to make referrals for youth Case Managers at the local family service departments are able to make referrals for youth Funded Agencies directly contact their local family service departments (ie. Georgia County Departments of Family and Children Services) To ensure youth are connected to funded programs, the Afterschool Care Program has implemented a “three-village” approach:
  52. 52. Afterschool Care Program Contact For additional information about Afterschool Care Program and to find out how youth in your area can participate, you may contact: Tameyer Evans, Program Manager Tameyer.evans@dhs.ga.gov 404-657-4651
  53. 53. Georgia Division of Family and Children Services Interim Director Bobby Cagle Georgia’s Personal Responsibility Education Program (GA-PREP)
  54. 54. What is PREP? On March 23, 2010 President Obama Signed the Affordable Health Care Act The purpose of the federally funded Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) is to: 1. Educate youth on both abstinence and contraception for the prevention of pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV/AIDS 2. Educate adolescents on at least three adulthood preparation subjects and life skills 3. Replicate evidence-based effective program models 4. Target youth populations that are the most high-risk or vulnerable for pregnancies
  55. 55. Where is PREP Funded?
  56. 56. Georgia’s PREP Initiative Mission To provide evidence-based programming to high priority youth ages 10-19 in an effort to educate and promote personal responsibility Vision Through a unified state initiative, provide high risk youth in 10 Georgia counties with free access to evidence-based teen pregnancy prevention programs and supplemental adult preparation subjects Goals Educate youth to make healthy and responsible decisions To reduce the risk of pregnancy, HIV and STI’s among high priority youth ages 10-19 (up to 21 if pregnant and/or parenting)
  57. 57. Overview of GA-PREP Target Populations Foster Youth, Homeless Youth, Youth involved in Juvenile Justice, LGBTQ, Pregnant and Parenting, African American, and Latino Youth Program Models •Making a Difference •Making Proud Choices •Be Proud, Be Responsible, Be Protected •Relationship Smarts+ •Keys to our Financial Future* Adult Preparation Subjects •Healthy Relationships •Healthy Life Skills •Adolescent Development •Financial Literacy* •Career Preparation* =10 PREP Implementation Counties FFY’14 GA-PREP Provided Funding to 18 Sub-Awardees = 73 unique implementation sites 1 5 1 1 1 1
  58. 58. • Department of Public Health – Foster Youth – Department of Juvenile Justice Youth • Community Based Organizations GA-PREP Partnerships
  59. 59. What have we learned from youth? 37% of surveyed PREP participants report having had sexual intercourse 30% of surveyed PREP participants report intention to have sexual intercourse in the next year  During the 6 months prior to participating in PREP –66% had not received information on birth control –63% had not received pregnancy testing –62% had not received STD testing or treatment At Entry:
  60. 60. Celebrating Success 60% of participants were more likely to abstain from sexual intercourse in the next year 74% of participants were more likely to use or ask a partner to use a condom 64% of participants were more likely to use or ask a partner to some method of birth control At Exit:
  61. 61. At exit, surveyed PREP participants reported they were more likely to:  Care about doing well in school (63%)  Continue education (64%)  Set personal goals (61%)  Form healthy positive relationships (60%)  Positively manage conflict in relationships (50%)  Say no/resist peer pressure (52%)  Manage money carefully (55%)
  62. 62. • Georgia’s Personal Responsibility Education Program (GA-PREP) is pleased to host a series of 1-daytrainings designed to help adults become a “Connected Caregiver” • These trainings have been designed specifically for foster parents, CCI and CPA caregivers, and case managers • Through funding from the DFCS PREP program, these trainings are being offered for FREE for up to 40 attendees (per training date) • Trainings will begin in February with encore trainings throughout the spring • Lunch will be provided at each training *Come learn the skills you need to become a “Connected Caregiver”, strategies for starting conversations about sensitive topics, and tools for educating youth about healthy relationships.* Connected Caregiver Training
  63. 63. Personal Responsibility Education Program Contact For additional information about the Personal Responsibility Education Program and to find out how youth in your area can participate, you may contact: Patrice Moss, Interim PREP Director Patrice.moss@dhs.ga.gov 404-657-4651
  64. 64. DFCS Community Programs Contact For additional information about the DFCS Community Programs Unit: Carmen C. Callaway Director carmen.callaway@dhs.ga.gov 404-463-4334

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