Human Development II Chapter
13-Developing Guidance Skills
Learning Objective: Analyze healthy and
appropriate ways to gui...
What’s the point of guidance?
 Guidance:

Direct and indirect actions
used by an adult to help children develop
appropria...
What do you need to do to
effectively guide children?
 Use

suggestions rather than commands.
 Encourage and show intere...
Guidelines for developing guidance
skills.
 Observe

the children.
 Ask yourself if you have any biases or
stereotypes? ...
One Form of Guidance-Direct
 Direct:

involves nonverbal and verbal

actions.
 Pay

attention to your non-verbals.

 Th...
More on Direct Guidance
 Use

simple language.

 Adjust

 Speak
 Save

 Be

your vocab. to fit the age

in a relaxed ...
More Direct Guidance Skills
 Encourage


Children will only become independent if given the
opportunity. They might surp...
Still More On Direct Guidance
 Provide
 This

time for change.

gives them an adjustment period.

 Consider
 They

Fee...
Even More On Direct Guidance
 Intervene
 For

when necessary.

Safety
 For Learning
 To make sure children are not exc...
Another Form of Guidance-Indirect
 Indirect

Guidance: involves outside
factors that influence behavior.
 Examples
 Set...
Techniques For Effective Guidance
 Positive

Reinforcement: Molding children’s
behavior through rewarding positive behavi...
More Techniques for Effective
Guidance
 Warning

A reminder of the limit. Only warn once.
 State the misbehavior and the...
More Effective Techniques
 I-Messages:

Tells the child how you feel
about his or her behavior.
 Doesn’t

place blame on...
More Techniques
 Effective
 Should

Praise

be age appropriate
 Give it immediately
 Establish eye contact
 Do not ov...
More Effective Techniques
 Suggesting:

Placing thoughts for consideration
into children’s minds.
Often leads to action
...
Yes, Even More Techniques
 Redirecting:

divert or turn attention in a
different direction
 Can

be done through distrac...
More Guidance Techniques
 Listening:

involves giving children your full
attention. Get at their level.
Active Listening:...
Prompting a Positive Self-Concept
 Self-concept:

the qualities a child
believes he or she possesses.
 Result

of the be...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Human Development II, Chapter 13

493 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
493
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Human Development II, Chapter 13

  1. 1. Human Development II Chapter 13-Developing Guidance Skills Learning Objective: Analyze healthy and appropriate ways to guide children. Compare and contrast direct vs. indirect guidance. FCS Standard: Child Development Standard 5
  2. 2. What’s the point of guidance?  Guidance: Direct and indirect actions used by an adult to help children develop appropriate behavior patterns.  Goals of Guidance  Maintain children’s self-esteem and produce a desired change in behavior.  Help the child learn self-control  Promote prosocial behaviors among children  Prosocial: acts of kindness that benefit others.
  3. 3. What do you need to do to effectively guide children?  Use suggestions rather than commands.  Encourage and show interest in the children.  Interact often and ask open-ended questions.  Model prosocial behaviors.  Be nurturing.
  4. 4. Guidelines for developing guidance skills.  Observe the children.  Ask yourself if you have any biases or stereotypes? This influences how you treat children.  Talk with other teachers.  Pay attention to your kids and don’t spend a lot of time talking to other adults.  Get at their level-literally.  Don’t interrupt an activity, unless you can increase knowledge or safety.  Let kids do for themselves as much as possible.
  5. 5. One Form of Guidance-Direct  Direct: involves nonverbal and verbal actions.  Pay attention to your non-verbals.  They communicate, especially for infants.  They should reinforce your verbals.
  6. 6. More on Direct Guidance  Use simple language.  Adjust  Speak  Save  Be your vocab. to fit the age in a relaxed voice. loud voices for emergencies. positive.  Tell  Offer them what to do, not what not to do. choices with care  Offer choices when you want to them to make a choice and let them follow through. Give direction when needed.
  7. 7. More Direct Guidance Skills  Encourage  Children will only become independent if given the opportunity. They might surprise you! Let them help each other.  Be  independence and cooperation. firm Remain calm, and don’t give in.  Be Consistent Children will test limits more when there is inconsistence.  Be consistent with behavior and among children. 
  8. 8. Still More On Direct Guidance  Provide  This time for change. gives them an adjustment period.  Consider  They Feelings need to learn to recognize, understand, and express their feelings.  Best when discussed with 1 child or a small group.  Role model how children should react to others who are upset.  Don’t overreact to mistakes.
  9. 9. Even More On Direct Guidance  Intervene  For when necessary. Safety  For Learning  To make sure children are not excluded  When children are impolite  Arguments over property
  10. 10. Another Form of Guidance-Indirect  Indirect Guidance: involves outside factors that influence behavior.  Examples  Set up of the center-open areas to move, low shelving units, low bathroom facilities, low coat hooks.  Placing yourself where you can observe easily  Label shelves or units with a picture of what belongs in that area.
  11. 11. Techniques For Effective Guidance  Positive Reinforcement: Molding children’s behavior through rewarding positive behavior.  Using Consequences: a result that follows an action or behavior. 2 Types 1. Natural: experiences that follow naturally as a result of a behavior  2. Artificial: (logical consequences) those that are deliberately set up by an adult to show what will happen if a limit is not followed. Should relate to the behavior. 
  12. 12. More Techniques for Effective Guidance  Warning A reminder of the limit. Only warn once.  State the misbehavior and then the consequence. Use a firm voice.   Time Out: A guidance technique that involves moving a child away from others for a short period of time. Used when child needs to calm down, not for punishment.  More effective for 4-5 year-olds. Example of an artificial consequence. 
  13. 13. More Effective Techniques  I-Messages: Tells the child how you feel about his or her behavior.  Doesn’t place blame on the child, but helps the child understand how others view his or her actions.  Should include the child’s behavior, your feelings about the behavior, the effects of the behavior.
  14. 14. More Techniques  Effective  Should Praise be age appropriate  Give it immediately  Establish eye contact  Do not overuse it  Ineffective praise or empty praise is more damaging than helpful. It is repetitive and not genuine. Can lead to children basing their feelings of self-worth on adults’ opinions of them.
  15. 15. More Effective Techniques  Suggesting: Placing thoughts for consideration into children’s minds. Often leads to action  Make it positive and use it often   Prompting Used to stop unacceptable action or start acceptable action.  Can be used to prepare for transition  Differs from suggestion because a response is required  Can be verbal or non-verbal  May need to be repeated often 
  16. 16. Yes, Even More Techniques  Redirecting: divert or turn attention in a different direction  Can be done through distraction  Helps the child express themselves in a more positive way.  The substitute must be appealing.  Modeling: when ever you speak or move you are modeling behavior  Involves both verbal and non-verbal
  17. 17. More Guidance Techniques  Listening: involves giving children your full attention. Get at their level. Active Listening: first listen, then respond by repeating what they said.  Doesn’t necessarily solve the problem.   Ignoring: avoiding acknowledging an inappropriate behavior Not used when the behavior is harmful  You can tell them what you are ignoring and the behavior you desire.   Encouraging  Helps children believe in themselves.
  18. 18. Prompting a Positive Self-Concept  Self-concept: the qualities a child believes he or she possesses.  Result of the beliefs, feelings, and perceptions a child has of him or herself.  Mirrored in their behavior.  How you treat a child can promote or undermine a child’s self-concept.  The most subtle behavior can impact a child.

×