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ChalleNGed To Achieve!




Mentor Training Manual
        Post Residential Department




Changing America One Youth At A ...
Congratulations and welcome New Mentors to the Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy (HYCA) Family!
Dear Friend of Youth,

Today...
Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy Basic Mentor Training


Welcome to the Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe team. This three – four hou...
Table of Contents
        Program Overview
I.
                  Goals and Objectives of YCP (page 4)
        A.
          ...
I. PROGRAM OVERVIEW
In 1993 ChalleNGe was designed to produce long-term post-residential success for young adults that wer...
B. EIGHT CORE COMPONENTS

       While attending the Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy, the cadets are introduced to the eig...
RESPONSIBLE CITIZENSHIP: Cadets will be taught the importance of being a responsible citizen of the
United States. They wi...
C. PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY

  The mission of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program is to intervene in the life of an at-r...
A. HYCA Position Description—Mentor

Position Summary       The mentor serves as a role model, friend and advocate to a ca...
The Post-Residential Phase of the Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy is crucial to the long-term success of cadets (applicant...
A. During the Residential Phase of the program there are two major requirements for mentors. You must attend a 3.5-4
hour ...
Mentor screening is a comprehensive, multi-phase process that requires cooperation, communication, and
discretion from Pos...
volunteering for the wrong reasons. The following is a compilation of red flags and risk indicators which may become evide...
A. CADET GOALS: While at YCP, cadets develop their Post Residential Action Plan (PRAP). One role the mentor plays
during t...
Based on the work of Dr. Larry Brendtro, in his book Reclaiming Youth at Risk: Our Hope for the Future, there are basic
ne...
VI. STAGES OF MENTOR/MENTEE RELATIONSHIP
Upon entering this relationship, as with another, there are distinct stages that ...
VII. TOOLS FOR SUCCESS

In October 1993, the National Mentoring Institute invited a group of metropolitan Boston street
yo...
“How can adults earn your respect?”
1.   Be truthful and straightforward; don’t
     sugarcoat the truth.
2.   Be honest a...
VIII. Keys to Mentoring Success


 1. Commitment. Youth-at-risk feel like failures and often resist forming deep relations...
9. Be Yourself. Don’t try to be perfect or someone you’re not. You’re not the answer-giver or all-wise one. You should fee...
IX. A Year’s Worth of Mentoring Activities1

           52 ideas, one for each week of the year:

1. Set your mentoring go...
 22 Ideas for Writing Your Youth (one for each week
                               of the Residential Phase) & 35 Post Re...
21
X. Listening…An Essential Tool
Genuine listening is hard work. Listening requires, first of all that we are not preoccupie...
Who did you interview?__________________________________
Did you learn something important about them? What was it?
______...
Notes:
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
___...
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
__________...
_______________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________
__________...
XII. MENTOR REMINDERS
1. While the cadet is with you during the Residential or Post Residential
Phases, there are certain ...
27
MENTOR REPORTING METHODS:

Again, we should receive your MMR no later than (NLT) the 10th of each month. The
following ...
MMR – Monthly Mentor Report Month of ____/____ 2009
Spoke with: Cadet       Mentor       Parent/Relative     Recruiter    ...
Date Received: __________ Name of reporter: _________________ Relationship to Cadet: ___________
                         ...
33
                                          Automated Mentor Reporting
Overview - Introduction to Automated Mentor Report...
34
As goals are developed by each Cadet, Staff may logon and review them. Staff will also answer the five SMART questions
...
On the left in the “PRAP” menu the Mentor can view the Cadet’s PRAP workbook. If the Mentor has more than one Cadet, a
dro...
This is the screen where contact and placement information are inputted for a given month. When you first enter, the defau...
The same reporting protocol applies to the other “Placement” options shown on the Report page. At the bottom of the report...
After “Continue” is selected the Mentor is returned to the home page. The process ends with the Mentor selecting “Logout”
...
HYCA Mentoring RESOURCES

     For more information on the CareGivers Choice-Mentoring Children of Prisoners program that ...
Mentor Handbook 09
Mentor Handbook 09
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Mentor Handbook 09

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Mentor Handbook 09

  1. 1. ChalleNGed To Achieve! Mentor Training Manual Post Residential Department Changing America One Youth At A Time!
  2. 2. Congratulations and welcome New Mentors to the Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy (HYCA) Family! Dear Friend of Youth, Today’s youth encounter many risks that place them in jeopardy of poor developmental outcomes. One of the best ways to combat these risks is through education. Unfortunately, roughly 22,000 Indiana High School students dropped out last year or are habitually truant, costing Indiana taxpayers over 5 million dollars annually in state and government assistance programs, criminal activities, juvenile detention and prison cost, substance abuse and treatment facilities, teen pregnancies, and increasing medical costs. Statistics indicate that 67% of Indiana prisoners are high school dropouts. As you are aware, in the early 1990’s Congress not only recognized the National guard’s ability to train, lead, and mentor youth, but also the importance established through it’s strong community ties. As a result, Congress enacted legislation authorizing each state the opportunity, as part of its domestic mission, to conduct a Youth ChalleNGe Program. The Indiana Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy (HYCA) is a result of this effort. There are currently 36 Youth ChalleNGe Programs in 29 states. Currently held at Camp Atterbury, the HYCA is a 17 ½ month program offered to youth ages 16 – 19, who are at risk of not graduating, have dropped out, been expelled from High School that are currently drug free, an Indiana resident, unemployed, not pending felony charges or convictions, willing to commit for the 5 ½ residential phase, and mentally and physically able to complete the program. Supported by a mission of offering it’s Cadet participants the opportunity to develop the strength of character and the life skills necessary to become successful, responsible citizens, the HYCA has, since July 2007, graduated 35 Indiana youth in its first class. Currently we are in week 3 of our second class at the HYCA. We are very fortunate to be involved with such a valuable asset to our communities. Please help us spread the word and the need for community support for the Indiana HYCA. If you are familiar with anyone within the Indiana Department of Education (IDOE) please share this with them. For more information, please visit our website at www.ngycp.org/in. HYCA staff, graduates, and Parents are available to make on-site presentations, in you area to share our stories and successes with everyone. I look forward to speaking with you soon. The Post Residential Advisors (PRAs) named below will be contacting you this month to welcome you aboard and introduce them selves to you. If they catch you at a bad time, feel free to give them a better time and/or location to contact you. Each month your PRA will call or email to say hello, give you encouragement, discuss any questions or problems, and to get some specific information about your Cadet/Mentee. Monthly calls usually last no more than 5 to 10 minutes, depending on your timeliness and accuracy when you turn in your mentor report and are based on any concerns addressed at that time. If the PRA contacts you and gets information about your Cadet that DOES NOT MEAN that you can neglect submitting your report. We need your report to authenticate your student’s file and to have in our records as proof that mentoring is very valuable to the success of our young adults. Your Mentor training packet includes 2 “Monthly Mentor Reports (MMR)” for your use during the first two months of your commitment as a Mentor. Please feel free to copy these if you prefer this method and would like to fax or mail the report to the PRA. We also offer other convenient methods to submit your Mentor report. You will learn about them later in the training. Please begin tracking all contacts with your Cadet while they are at HYCA which includes email, mail, phone call, or face to face visits. Your reporting schedule is written below for your convenience. Please keep this information somewhere readily accessible in case you need it again. HYCA PRA contact information is listed below. Please contact your PRA immediately if you have a crisis or emergency in your relationship with your youth. We’re here to help you build a relationship and friendship that will last a lifetime. Again, thank you for allowing us to assist Indiana youth with an opportunity to DREAM, BELIEVE, ACHIEVE! Sincerely, The HYCA RPM Team 1
  3. 3. Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy Basic Mentor Training Welcome to the Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe team. This three – four hour training session will:  Inform you about the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program  Educate you about the benefits of Mentoring  Enlighten you about how Mentoring has helped you in your life  Advise you of our expectations and standards for Mentors  Provide you with resources and tools to be the best Mentor you can be  Bring to light issues of today’s youth and the mechanics of forming bonds with them Please take some time to review the following forms and await instructions from the training leader about which forms to complete. In about three to four hours you will be ready to improve America, one youth at a time! This manual is not all-inclusive, but it is designed to serve as a resource for mentor during the residential and post residential phases of the program. Remember that as a mentor you are limited only by your imagination and creativity. Use the ideas provided in this manual as a spring for you to bounce into your new role as a mentor. If you create exciting new activities that work please share those ideas with us. We are always open to new suggestions for improving and enhancing our training courses and materials. 2
  4. 4. Table of Contents Program Overview I. Goals and Objectives of YCP (page 4) A. Eight Core Components (page 5-6) B. Program Eligibility (page 7) C. I. Definition of a Mentor HYCA Mentor Prospect Position Description (page 8) A. Mentor Prospect Position Description Agreement (from the Mentor application) (page 9) B. II. Responsibilities of a Mentor During Residential Phase (page 10) A. 1. Attend Training 2. Maintaining Communication 3. Attending Family Day(s) Post Residential Phase (page 10) B. Review of PRAP 1. Monthly Reports (page 28) 2. Mentor Screening (pages 11-12) C. 1. Mentor Disclosure and Release Authorization Role of a Mentor (page 13) III. Cadet Goal A. B. Parents C. Placement D. Teaching and Coaching E. Communication F. Support (Financial) Basic Needs of Youth (page 14) IV. Stages of Mentor/Mentee Relationship (page 15) V. Tools for Success (pages 16-17) VI. Keys to Mentoring Success (page 18-19) VII. A Years Worth of Mentoring Activity (page 20-21) VIII. Listening Skills (page 22) IX. Training Activities Recap and Pages for Notes (page 23-26) X. XI. Mentor Reminders (page 27) Tobacco Policy and Event Dress Code A. Mentor Reporting Methods (page 28-39) XII. XIII. Mentor Resources (page 40) PRA/RPM Contact Info (page 41) XIV. March 8, 2009 (Sunday) Family Days: March 28, 2009 (Saturday) 1:00 – 4:00 pm IVY Tech Community College-Columbus, IN Mentor Match/Visit Mentor Visit: To Be Determined During the Residential Phase (Sunday 1pm-4pm) April 10-12, 2009 (Easter Weekend), May 22-25, 2009 (Memorial Day Weekend) Pass Home Dates: June 13, 2008 (Saturday) Graduation: 3
  5. 5. I. PROGRAM OVERVIEW In 1993 ChalleNGe was designed to produce long-term post-residential success for young adults that were struggling academically. Studies showed that these youth were less likely to succeed as adults and three times more likely to slip into poverty or criminal activity. Without intervention delinquent youth cost states millions of dollars per year. In 2007, Indiana became the 28 state and the 34th Youth ChalleNGe Program across the United States. There are currently 29 states and 36 programs in operation to assist young adults that have given up on their education. The Indiana National Guard Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy is a 17-month program, which offers at-risk adolescents an opportunity to change their future. The initial part of the program consists of a five-month residential phase. During this time, the young people will learn self-discipline, leadership and responsibility, while working towards a high school equivalency diploma (GED). Participants live and work in a controlled military environment, which encourages teamwork and personal growth. A second twelve-month phase consists of helping to enroll students in continued education, a technical school program, or an entry-level job. The young person works with the guidance of a trained mentor during the post-residential phase. A. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES The Youth ChalleNGe Program curriculum combines work, service to the community, physical training, and challenging individual and team activities into one unique experience. The core of the program consists of 200 hours of classroom instruction to prepare students for the state high school equivalency diploma (GED). Other major blocks of instruction include a career skills and exploration program, health and drug abuse awareness, leadership and discipline, personal development, physical fitness, and basic work skills. Cadets participate in service to community projects to encourage personal growth and development. The Youth ChalleNGe Program is run by trained, active, or retired National Guard and civilian personnel. One adult counselor is assigned to an appropriate ratio of cadets, and classroom size is limited to ensure maximum personal attention for each student. Additional support staff includes certified medical personnel, administrative staff, case managers and placement counselors. Upon completion of the residential phase, a trained and matched mentor from their community assists the cadet in post-graduate development. The post-residential phase of YCP is a period of 12 months of continued support to cadets who have successfully completed the program’s residential phase. The goal of the post-residential phase is to place and keep each cadet in continued, gainful, and meaningful employment or in a vocational/educational program. There is no cost to participants or their families for this program. The Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Program does not exclude any person based on race, color, national origin, gender or religion. 4
  6. 6. B. EIGHT CORE COMPONENTS While attending the Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy, the cadets are introduced to the eight core components. Each component emphasizes essential skills needed to function in today’s society. The cadets are trained and then tested on the eight core components. In order to achieve their rank and successfully complete the program cadets are required to excel in each component. The eight core components are: • Life Coping Skills • Academic Excellence • Job Skills • Responsible Citizenship • Leadership/Followership • Health and Hygiene • Physical Fitness • Service to Community LIFE COPING SKILLS: Under the core component of life coping skills, cadets receive training on everyday skills required to function in today’s society. Cadets are tested on for example: understanding basic economics and personal financial management, obtaining and maintaining a good credit rating, debt management, debt avoidance strategies, ability to set and achieve goals, and knowledge and understanding of conflict resolution strategies. ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE: Within the educational excellence component, cadets are pushed to increase their educational grade level or obtain their GED. They are coached on strategies for continuing their education or obtaining verifiable employment. Additionally, to make them more marketable YCP cadets are instructed on keyboarding to keep up with upcoming technology. JOB SKILLS: Cadets are trained in the art of making themselves more marketable for job hunting. Cadets are instructed how to obtain a job to maintaining employment. Some specific skills that are emphasized are: completing a job application, constructing a suitable resume, responding to employment ads, and appropriate appearance and behavior during job interviews. 5
  7. 7. RESPONSIBLE CITIZENSHIP: Cadets will be taught the importance of being a responsible citizen of the United States. They will learn: the basic understanding of the Constitution and U.S. government, understand the election and voting process, and will register with the Selective Service Board and register to vote when applicable and appropriate. LEADERSHIP/FOLLOWERSHIP: Cadets are placed in various positions within their platoon to learn skills in being a leader and follower. Every cadet will hold a leadership position within his or her platoon. Cadets are expected to have to ability to demonstrate: basic military custom and courtesy, moral/ethical leadership, good citizen values: i.e. integrity, honesty, trust, ethical behavior, morality, fair play, responsibility, respect for oneself and others, and loyalty. Additional, cadets are taught the importance of teamwork and functioning as an effective team member. HEALTH AND HYGIENE: Cadets are expected to demonstrate the understanding of: the effects of substance abuse on physical health and well-being, the importance of a proper diet, a general knowledge of physical fitness concepts, and sexually transmitted diseases including AIDS. PHYSICAL FITNESS: Cadets will be in the best shape of their lives during their time at YCP. Cadets are evaluated on their participation in regularly scheduled physical fitness training to the greatest extent possible. Also it is a goal of YCP for each cadet to improve their level of fitness in all categories of the President’s Council on Physical Fitness Training. SERVICE TO COMMUNITY: Cadets are taught that part of being a responsible citizen is giving back to the community. While at YCP, cadets are required to complete 40 hours of community service activities, participate in planning a community service project, and demonstrate an awareness of value of community service. Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels, Cadet Harvard, Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels, Cadet Hobbs, MG R. Martin Umbarger, The Adjutant General MG R. Martin Umbarger, The Adjutant General 6
  8. 8. C. PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY The mission of the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program is to intervene in the life of an at-risk youth and produce a program graduate with the values, skills, education and self-discipline necessary to succeed as an adult. FOR A CADET: The basic qualifications for acceptance into the Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy (HYCA) program are: 1. Must be between the age of 16-19 at entrance time (Class start date) 2. A high school dropout who has not attained a GED 3. Drug Free (applicants will be tested on class start date) 4. Mentally and physically capable to participate in the program 5. Not in trouble with Law Enforcement (No pending felony charges or convictions) 6. An Indiana resident FOR A MENTOR: See Mentor Prospect Position Description (page 10) II. DEFINITION OF A MENTOR In Greek, it means “steadfast” or “enduring”. In the Western thought, we have come to use the term role model as interchangeable with the mentor. Riverside Webster’s II New College Dictionary 1995 defines a mentor as “a wise and trusted teacher or counselor”. The act of mentoring is a series of ongoing of little successes. You will be able to make a real impact through consistent and ongoing relationship building. As you and the young person develop new skills, goals and new habits begin to emerge, the mentor should continue to encourage, guide, and shape this growth. Partners, Inc., a twenty-five-year-old intensive-mentoring program in Colorado, defines a mentor as a “friend, advocate, and role model.” The young people at the Youth Challenge Program look for the same fundamental things everyone does in a friend. A friend should be someone who is trustworthy, sincere in their actions, and shares common interests and experiences. Though the cadets did not use the term “advocate”, they did echo the concept. The mentor should be willing and active in their efforts to further the young person’s interests and goals. While discussing the term role model, the cadets voiced a need for someone to look up to and to have the opportunity to learn from the experiences of another. But most importantly, to guide and support them to become whoever they choose to be. One of the gifts that you receive from mentoring is the gift of knowledge. Many of our young people have a great deal to offer if only given the opportunity and audience to present them to. Many mentors make the mistake of failing to recognize the many competencies the cadets bring into the mentoring relationships. 7
  9. 9. A. HYCA Position Description—Mentor Position Summary The mentor serves as a role model, friend and advocate to a cadet for at least 17 months. • Reports to Regional Coordinator or the Post Residential Advisor Working Relationships Mentors a cadet • • Returns completed screening materials promptly. Duties and Responsibilities Attends one Mentor Basic Training (learning about your commitment to the • youth and to HYCA) and two three hours of visitation with the youth during the residential phase • Commits to spending at least 17 months in consistent contact with a cadet. Makes consistent contact with the cadet by phone, mail, or in person monthly. • Four contacts per month are required. At least two of these must be face to face during the Post-Residential Phase each month. • Shares occasional, informal fun activities with his or her cadet. The mentor and cadet will jointly select and schedule the activities. Assist the cadets with the PRAP modification and discusses his or her • progress in that plan. Communicates at least monthly by phone, mail or online reporting with the • Post Residential Advisor. The mentor promptly informs the Advisor of problems or needs in the cadet's life or in their relationship. Observes all program policies and guidelines for mentors. Discuss violations • of policies by cadets with the Post Residential Advisors. • Refers the cadet to community resources as needed and helps the cadet find and research those resources. 8 B. MENTOR PROSPECT POSITION DESCRIPTION AGREEMENT
  10. 10. The Post-Residential Phase of the Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy is crucial to the long-term success of cadets (applicants). The goal of the Post-Residential Phase is to ensure cadets achieve their identified goals and remain free from criminal activity and substance abuse problems. Mentors who are committed to helping the young person they volunteer for are indispensable to the Post-Residential Phase, and ultimately aid in the long-term success of the cadet. Applicants actively participate in the recruitment of mentors through relationships they had prior to entering the ChalleNGe Program producing a “Friendly Match Strategy” which eliminates the isolation many mentors feel when matched with strangers. Each application should include 2 mentor applications to be complete. Mentors are then screened, trained and matched during the residential phase. Good mentors may be found in many places: youth workers, teachers, religious leaders, coaches, business professionals, community workers, neighbors, etc. QUALIFICATIONS OF A MENTOR  Be at least 23 years old and the same gender/sex as the cadet.  Live in the same geographical area as the cadet.  Agree to and be able to successfully pass a criminal background check.  Not live in the same household as the cadet and not be an immediate family member (step mother, father, brother, or sister)  Capable of being a role model who demonstrates by example the types of life skills, work ethics and attitudes needed to be a productive member of society. HOOSIER YOUTH CHALLENGE ACADEMY’S EXPECTATION OF MENTORS  Attend a mentor training session that will be provided at our Academy.  Begin building a relationship with the Cadet and provide encouragement during the five (5) month Residential Phase.  Continue the Mentor-Mentee relationship through visits, mail or email, and telephone during the twelve (12) month Post-Residential Phase. You are required to have at least 4 of the above contacts monthly.  Provide guidance for social development and achievement of the Cadet's goals and objectives after graduation.  Submit a monthly progress report to the ChalleNGe program. MENTOR TRAINING All individuals volunteering to be a Mentor MUST ATTEND MENTOR TRAINING. Individuals will receive training in program requirements, supervision and guidance of at-risk youth, available support resources, and the actual role of a mentor. Training will generally be on a Friday or Saturday and last about three hours. Parents/Guardians are encouraged to attend the training sessions so they will have an understanding of the Mentor/Mentee relationship and all that it requires. For additional information contact the Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy Post Residential Advisor. I understand the aims and purposes of the Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Program’s Mentoring Responsibility. I will be dedicated in providing assistance to ChalleNGe applicants that I have volunteered to mentor and I agree to meet all standards set forth by the Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy if I am selected. __________________________________________________________________ Date:_______________________________ (Mentor Applicant’s Signature) 9 III. RESPONSIBILITIES OF MENTORS
  11. 11. A. During the Residential Phase of the program there are two major requirements for mentors. You must attend a 3.5-4 hour mentor training facilitated by a trained HYCA staff member. Mentors must maintain communication with the cadet during their residential phase. If for some reason you are unable to accomplish either one of these, mentoring may not be for you at this particular time. By maintaining communication, whether it is by face to face visits, phone, email or letters it will make a world of difference in the formation of this relationship. The length of the formal mentoring relationship is 14 months which is a total of 2 months while the Cadet is in the Residential Phase and 12 months in the Post Residential Phase. The more contact your Cadet has with you, the stronger your foundation will be. Mentors are allowed to visit with family and Cadets when scheduled. This time will also allow you and the family time together to bond and become familiar with each other. To have the most positive impact on your cadet it will take all of you working together. B. During the Post-Residential Phase mentors are to provide support, guidance, and encouragement to keep their cadet in pursuit of goals established in their Post Residential Action Plan (PRAP). The PRAP is a tool used to build the bridge between the Residential and Post Residential Phases and reflects a series of planned goals and objectives based on each of the 8 Core Components established by the YCP to achieve success. The PRAP was developed with the intention that it would guide youth into long-term placement after graduation from the Residential Phase. The PRAP is implemented when the graduates return home to their communities. With the guidance of their mentor, 85% of the graduates from YCP’s have achieved these goals and have engaged in positive and productive lifestyles 2 or 3 years after completing the program. Most continue to benefit from ongoing mentoring relationships. The mentor is required to have consistent monthly contact with their cadet. Contact can be through various forms of communication: telephone, mail, internet, through Parents/Guardians; however, when possible that face to face contact is the most valuable type of communication possible. Each month the cadet and the mentor will report to their assigned POST RESIDENTIAL ADVISOR (PRA) in the Post-Residential Department. This report merely discusses the progress, or lack of progress, the cadet is making or has made. These reports provide a great opportunity for the mentor and cadet to meet and discuss the cadet’s current status with regards to their PRAP. The HYCA will supply Mentors with blank report forms prior to graduation and a copy of the cadet’s PRAP. (see pages 25-39 of the Mentor Training Manual for more info). The primary long-term outcome for all ChalleNGe programs is defined as “successful placement at the end of the 12 month Post-Residential Phase”. Successful placement means that a Graduate is active in the military, enrolled in school, working or participating in volunteer projects. Placement serves as the primary way to measure program success. Although programs celebrate successes along the way like cadets’ educational and physical achievements, the true test of any program is its long term impact on the lives of its graduates. Benefits of the PRAP: • Trains Cadets in goal-setting and daily planning skills • Increases teamwork and levels workload between Residential and Post-Residential staff • Ensures early and more durable placements • Provides focus for mentoring relationships and increases mentors’ responsibility for the Post Residential Action Plan • Increases Graduates Post-Residential accountability 10 C. MENTORING SCREENING
  12. 12. Mentor screening is a comprehensive, multi-phase process that requires cooperation, communication, and discretion from Post-Residential staff and Recruiters. Every Mentor must authorize the HCYA to conduct a statewide and federal criminal background history report by completing the Mentor Disclosure and Release Authorization on page 9 of the mentor application. A copy has been attached for your records MENTOR DISCLOSURE AND RELEASE AUTHORIZATION In connection with my application to become a Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy Mentor, I understand that a consumer report and/or investigative consumer report, as defined by the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), may be obtained by an agent of the State of Indiana or from BARADA ASSOCIATES INC., its agents or employees, and I authorize all corporations, employers, co-workers, references, educational institutions, licensing bodies, courts, law enforcement agencies, governmental agencies or departments, and military services to provide information about my background, including but not limited to driving records, court records, academic records, professional license records and employment information or records. I agree to release the aforesaid from any liability for collecting that information. I understand that an investigative consumer report is a special type of consumer report that is obtained through interviews and may contain information about my character, general reputation, personal characteristics, and/or mode of living. Upon my written request within a reasonable period of time, a complete disclosure of the nature and scope of that investigation will be made to me in writing within five days of the date on which the request was received. I further authorize the Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy, to request a consumer report and/or investigative consumer report about me, for future mentor responsibilities, at any time during the course of my mentorship to the extent allowed by law. I agree that this Disclosure and Release Authorization will be valid, now or in the future, in original, faxed, copied or electronic form. I understand that my date of birth and social security number will be used solely for identification purposes. Personal information provided will not be released outside this Academy. First Full Name Middle Last Suffix Any other name(s) used   Social Security # Date of Birth (MM/DD/ YYYY) Present Address City/State/Zip/County Telephone Number(s) Previous Cities/States of Residence During Last 7 Years Driver’s License # State of Issuance Signature of Mentor Applicant _______________________________________ Date _________________________________ 11 Although it is impossible to foresee some of the indeterminable and unpredictable factors that can influence whether a mentor match is both effective and successful, there are definite warning signs that can help you to weed out candidates who may be
  13. 13. volunteering for the wrong reasons. The following is a compilation of red flags and risk indicators which may become evident through a candidate’s background and reference checks or during the application and interview process. Red Flags - The following should be cause for immediate suspicion and concern: • Inconsistencies found between the information a candidate discloses in interviews and applications as compared to that made available through criminal background checks. Candidates should not deny charges, respond defensively, or be evasive regarding their criminal pasts. • Past accusations of child abuse and molestation. Be careful to look for convictions of an abusive nature that may have been renamed or reduced to lesser charges during judicial processes. • Candidates who have a history of drug, alcohol, or mental health problems but for some reason have not sought professional help because they “don’t believe in… (therapy, AA, etc)” or “have it all under control.” • Negative references that are evasive and lack concrete explanation and reasoning for their hesitance. Risk Indicators - The following may indicate that a candidate is incapable or ill-prepared to handle the responsibilities of being a mentor: Criminal Background Checks • Alcohol related offenses • Driving record offenses which place others at risk Reference Checks • Unreasonable desires to switch or change references • Difficulty supplying long-term or non-familial references • Unwillingness to identify friends or significant others • References are unwilling to return phone calls or messages to PRA’s Personal History • Unexpected termination of mental health or chemical dependency treatments, therapy, or rehabilitation • Inexplicable patterns of termination in areas of education, work, military, and/or volunteerism • Inexplicable relocation and/or difficulties finding suitable living situations • Irregular and inconsistent patterns in personal relationships • Noticeable anxiety regarding sexual preference or romantic relationships • Unwillingness to revisit or attempt to resolve issues from own childhood Hobbies, Attitudes, Beliefs • Leisure activities are concentrated in areas that do not seem age-appropriate • Lack of hobbies and interests because all spare time is dedicated to child specific causes and organizations • Unreasonable or overzealous beliefs regarding issues of religion, sexuality, race, or ethnicity Flexibility & Time Commitment • Tendencies to over-commit and neglect areas of personal life while volunteering • Candidate has “all the time in the world” to spend with their mentee and is uncommonly accommodating to others’ schedules • Candidate is not flexible and too rigid or specific in their demands to spend time with mentee Expectations of Relationship • Desires to assume a strong “parental” role in mentee’s life • Solely desires to be mentee’s friend • Unrealistic expectations of change 12 IV. ROLE OF A MENTOR
  14. 14. A. CADET GOALS: While at YCP, cadets develop their Post Residential Action Plan (PRAP). One role the mentor plays during the post-residential phase is providing support and guidance. This support enables the cadet to remain focused on his/her original educational and/or employment goals. B. PARENTS: As a mentor, you are not a foster parent, nor are you expected to become one. However, the mentor should try to establish a positive relationship with the cadet’s parent(s). Also, attempts to encourage a positive, productive relationship between cadet and parent should be fostered. C. PLACEMENT: Through modeling behaviors such as networking, mentor’s pass along valuable life skills needed in today’s society. One of the tasks during the Post-Residential phase is helping the cadet find and maintain appropriate employment and/or placement into vocational training or some form of higher education. The Post-Residential Department initiates this process; however, it’s the mentor that will have the biggest impact on the outcome. Various studies have demonstrated the effect mentors have on cadets staying focused on their education. Big Brothers/Big Sisters of America 1995 Impact Study revealed that young people with mentors were 53% less likely to skip school and 37% less likely to skip a class. D. TEACHING AND COACHING: In order to become a more productive, stronger citizen, mentors are expected to supply cadets with opportunities to learn. “Teachable Moments” This does not mean the relationship turns into one of dictatorship or intolerance for mistakes. Instead the cadet, observing the mentor in daily living chores, will be taught valuable life skills without even knowing it. Some examples are: appropriate appearance and clothing for different occasions, proper etiquette in social and business settings, the importance of continuing education, and problem solving. The above are skills that each one of us possess and take for granted, yet did we ever stop to think whom did we learn these skills from? E. COMMUNICATION: Communication is the key to any successful relationship. Many failures can be measured by the mere lack of communication. To ensure success for you and the cadet contact with each other should be consistent and frequent. Although that sounds like a great deal, keep in mind that your strength and guidance will make the cadet’s transition from residential to post-residential smoother. F. SUPPORT: Mentors are not expected to provide any financial support to cadets or their families. Instead, mentors should assist in identifying appropriate community service resources available. Take the time now to determine what services and systems your Mentee already needs or may benefit from. Make sure you are aware of your Mentees current involvement with: • Foster or kinship care • Juvenile or Family courts • Mental health services/counseling • Tutoring and other supplemental school services • Social clubs (such as Boy/Girl Scouts or 4-H) or Community/recreational centers (such as YMCA or Boys & Girls Clubs) There is no point in being able to identify “red flags,” or youth needs that may hinder the match, if you or our program is not in a position to help do something about them. 13 V. THE BASIC NEEDS OF YOUTH
  15. 15. Based on the work of Dr. Larry Brendtro, in his book Reclaiming Youth at Risk: Our Hope for the Future, there are basic needs to every young person that need to be met. Whether it is through negative means or positive means, the young person will find a way to meet those needs. Depending on the personality and how they respond to their environment the young person will either act out or drop out. The need to belong is among the most basic needs among all of us. Young people actively seek out acceptance, attention, and affection from others. If that is not available a young person who is prone to acting out would do such things as: joining a gang, promiscuous, overly dependent, and open to cults. While the young person who is prone to dropping out would display such behavior as: unattached, aloof, isolated, and guarded. The next need is mastery. Everyone possesses the need to be good at something. Some examples of acting/dropping out are: arrogant, risk taker, risk avoider, unmotivated, gives up easily, and overachiever. The need for independence is something that we can all recall, the desire to have control of your own destiny. Being able to take credit for the failures as well as the achievements begins the journey into adulthood. In order to gain independence a young person may: bully others, misuse sex, rebel, lack confidence, and feel inferior. The act of generosity is another need that young people strive for. Having the ability and opportunity to give rather than always receive. By having the ability young people begin to establish a sense of worth and to contribute to others lives. To obtain this sense some young people may become: co-dependent, over-involved, anti-social, disloyal, and hardened. Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy Class # 1 35 Graduates 14
  16. 16. VI. STAGES OF MENTOR/MENTEE RELATIONSHIP Upon entering this relationship, as with another, there are distinct stages that you will encounter. And there will be times when you can get stalled in a phase or even get backtracked. Don’t let this discourage you. Through consistency, you can change the way the cadet views the world. The first stage is forming. During this phase expect anxiety and testing of one’s limits. Both of you are entering into a new relationship. Even if you already know each other, the cadets have changed and there will be some getting used to the “new” young person standing before you. As well, your role in their lives have changed, you now carry an official title. Upon completion of the forming stage, the norming stage begins. This is a time period where common trust begins to form and each of you searches for common interests and goals. The storming phase signals the end of the honeymoon… Please expect some failures and setbacks. Everyone involved are humans and fallible. However, this is also an opportunity to turn a crisis into a learning opportunity. As the relationship continues, the performing stage begins. You and the cadet begin to finally feel comfortable and secure around each other. The mentor and cadet begin working towards mutual goals as trust deepens. The final stage is marked by the mourning and morning period. This is the end of the formal relationship (mourning) and the beginning of the informal relationship. It is not uncommon to return to various stages several times. Persistence and consistency will ensure that this relationship will succeed. The stages listed are not necessarily sequential. Sometimes an earlier stage that has been completed may be repeated. For example, after the Performing Stage, the Storming Stage might occur again or for the first time. This might mean emphasis needs to be placed on the Norming Stage or the Forming Stage. The first three months of the mentoring relationship are important and need a lot of attention. Successful early stages of the relationship— Forming and Norming—are crucial to the long-term effectiveness of the match and the achievement of ChalleNGe goals. Another critical time in the mentoring relationship is the first three months after graduation. This can become another Forming Stage. Storming is common during this period as well. Beneath all four needs lies the search for meaning. Youth strive to meet their ACTING OUT DROPPING OUT BELONGING basic needs because they want their lives to have meaning and importance. Join gangs Unattached Crave affection Rejected The drive to meet these needs becomes even more urgent when environment Crave acceptance Guarded is unsafe or inadequate. Promiscuous Lonely Acting Out/Dropping Out Overly dependent Aloof Open to cults Isolated When the four basic needs of youth are unmet, certain behaviors result. Some MASTERY youth act out in negative ways. Some turn negative feelings inward becoming Arrogant Failure oriented Risk taker Risk avoider passive and failing to act on opportunities. As basic needs are met, youth will Cheater Fearful resort less and less to negative behaviors in seeking to get their needs met. Delinquent Unmotivated Overachiever Gives up easily Forming GENEROSITY INDEPENDENCE Bully others Submissive Misuse sex Feel inferior Manipulative Helpless Norming Rebellious Irresponsible Mourning Reckless/Macho Lack confidence Martyr attitude Anti-social Co-dependent Narcissist Over involved Disloyal Servitude Hardened Bondage Exploitative 15 Performing
  17. 17. VII. TOOLS FOR SUCCESS In October 1993, the National Mentoring Institute invited a group of metropolitan Boston street youths to tell what they most needed and respected in an adult. These are the questions and answers that were given: “What do you most respect in an adult?” Class # 2 Male Platoon Endurance and perseverance 1. despite obstacles. 2. Giving. 3. Being down-to-earth. 4. Consistency and commitment over time. 5. Setting limits and trying to do the right thing. 6. Listening. 7. Expressing understanding. Looking at all sides of an issue, 8. being non-judgmental “What do you least respect in an adult?” 1. Ignorance-childish behavior. 2. Close-minded/inflexibility. 3. Disrespect for others’ opinions or feelings. Passing judgment, especially on teenagers. 4. False empathy - saying, “I know how you feel” 5. when they don’t. 6. Comparing the youth to others. 7. Pressuring the youth to do too much. 8. Giving pat answers rather than helping the youth think through problems independently. 16
  18. 18. “How can adults earn your respect?” 1. Be truthful and straightforward; don’t sugarcoat the truth. 2. Be honest and willing to share your own experiences. 3. Be loyal, trustworthy, and available to people. 4. Show beliefs through actions, not just words. 5. Do what you say you are going to do; follow through. 6. Be persistent and consistent. 7. Help people to feel positive, even in a difficult situation. 8. Be a good listener. Share experiences, not just ideas or principles. Work on dialogue and sharing; don’t 9. lecture. “What helps in developing a relationship?” 1. Having similar interests. 2. Having good listening skills 3. Learning to understand and speak the other person’s language. 4. Sharing experiences rather than preaching. Helping protégée’s become 5. more independent. 6. Respecting one another’s knowledge, experience, and friends. 17
  19. 19. VIII. Keys to Mentoring Success 1. Commitment. Youth-at-risk feel like failures and often resist forming deep relationships. Often this is because the adults in their lives have disappointed them repeatedly. They may try to undermine the relationship with you. They may test you to see if you are truly committed. Sometimes they will reject you as a protective device, thinking, “I’ll reject them before they can reject me.” Their experience with adults may have been hurtful rejection. Remember: View your commitment as a long-term investment, a commitment not linked to the youth’s responses. 2. Invest Time. Mentoring is a slow process. It does not try to get a lot done in small bursts or a short amount of time. Like all healthy relationships, mentoring involves frequent contact and long-term commitments from both mentor and youth. 3. Build Trust. Trust builds slowly over time. Don’t over extend yourself! Don’t pressure the youth. Once information is shared with you, be careful how you use it. Generally, anything you are told in confidence, you keep in confidence. Exceptions are when there is a crime planned or committed. Or when a youth plans or commits destructive acts on himself/herself or others. The Cadet should have been trained about this. Don’t make promises you can’t keep. Do what you say you will do. This is especially important in relationships with young people. Failing to follow through is a quick way to destroy trust, which is hard to regain. 4. Accept the Youth. Actions speak louder than words. It is critical that the youth understands that what he or she does will not cause you to reject him or her. Be prepared for the youth to test you on this. Mentors should offer unconditional love that is not based on performance. That does not mean you approve of behavior or agree with decisions. Try to separate the person from the behavior. 5. Be Accountable. The other side of unconditional acceptance and trust is accountability. Effective mentoring relationships are marked by mutual accountability in areas of personal growth. Model this accountability before you ask it of your youth. Are you faithfully following the standards for contacts and reporting? Do you do what you say you will do? 6. Let Them Talk. We learned something very surprising when we conducted a lengthy assessment of ChalleNGe. We wanted to learn the youths’ favorite activity with mentors. Their favorite reported activity was to “just talk” with their mentor. Overwhelmingly, they chose the word “friend” over “coach” or “teacher” to describe their relationship with their mentors. Youth at this age (16 to 18 years old) did not prefer recreation or instruction. 7. Create Shared Experiences. It can be challenging to have a relationship with someone who has little in common with you and who comes from a completely different culture. One way to meet this challenge and build understanding is by creating shared experiences with your youth. Plan activities of interest for your youth that will engage you both! The activities need not be expensive, but many should reflect the youth’s interest. It’s also good for you to expose the youth to your interests, to new things. This will further their education and broaden their horizons, especially when you talk in depth about the shared experience. However, keep in mind that one of the most important things you can do together is “just talk.” 8. Earn the Right to Be Heard. Trust needs to develop before your advice is likely to be received and appreciated. It’s best to have a good relationship before you make many suggestions and give a lot of advice. 18
  20. 20. 9. Be Yourself. Don’t try to be perfect or someone you’re not. You’re not the answer-giver or all-wise one. You should feel comfortable saying, “I don’t know.” Honesty is best. But, when practical, try to steer the mentee toward a solution or answer. Remember what these youth are looking for: someone who loves them unconditionally and values them as worthwhile human beings. Yes, they need answers and advice, but first they need a relationship with someone who respects them—you. The relationship is valuable in itself. 10. Know Your Mentee. Get to know your young person. Try to understand their music (including lyrics), clothes, friends, use of time, etc. These are indications of the youth’s values and beliefs. Learn what they like and dislike and why. Watch body language. Pay attention to details. Seek first to understand, then to be understood. Listen for feelings, not just words. Ask lots of open-ended questions. Questions that carefully probe values and beliefs that focus on underline words and actions. 11. Develop Empathy. Empathy requires us to hear the feelings, not just the words, of a troubled young person. This leads us to understanding and compassion. Empathy enables us to be effective when we need to confront behavior or decisions. It is critical to be an effective, responsive, perceptive listener. Until we really know the person—the unmet needs, the hurts, and the desires—it’s difficult to have sufficient empathy. 12. Be Prepared for Teachable Moments. Convert crisis to opportunity by being available to listen and offer support. Do this when the youth is ready to receive it, not when it is convenient for you. Remember: To change, a youth needs both the pain of failure and rejection, as well as hope in the form of a caring relationship and useful information. Look for teachable moments in everything you and the youth talk about and do together. Effective teachable moments come out of a natural shared experience or conversation. Example: The mentee is working on getting his driver’s license. This is a great opportunity to talk about driving safety, drunken driving, insurance, responsibility, costs, and budgeting. 13. Measure Success by Your Actions—Not Youth’s Response. Effective mentors are long-term investors. Financial experts will tell you that long-term investors can become wealthy. The same principle works in mentoring. Mentors need to commit to making deposits of unconditional love and acceptance regardless of how unlovable a youth may be. Mentoring is a long-term commitment. The payoff may not be recognizable for months or years. In rare cases, the mentor never sees any payoff. To be a successful mentor means answering yes to these questions: Was I faithful in my commitment? Did I do what I said I would do? Did I try hard and care deeply? If you can answer yes to those questions, you are a successful mentor, regardless of how the youth responded. Or what he or she did or became. Class # 2 Female Platoon 19
  21. 21. IX. A Year’s Worth of Mentoring Activities1 52 ideas, one for each week of the year: 1. Set your mentoring goals together. 32. Find a summer job. 2. Tackle some homework. 33. Set up a work internship. 3. Make dinner together. 34. Talk about networking. 4. Go out for dinner together. 35. Talk about what it takes to get ahead. 5. Make popcorn and talk. 36. Talk about health insurance. 6. Go to a movie. 37. Talk about taxes. 7. Go to a concert. 38. Talk about balancing work and life. 8. Shoot some hoops. 39. Talk about balancing a checkbook. 9. Go to the library together. 40. Talk about balancing a budget. 10. Just hang out. 41. Talk about living within one’s means. 11. Figure out how to program your VCR. 42. Talk about credit cards. 12. Learn about pop music. 43. Go bargain hunting. 13. Talk about life. 44. Plan a week’s worth of meals. 14. Give a tour of your current job. 45. Do a week’s grocery shopping together. 15. Talk about your very first job. 46. Go holiday shopping. 16. Talk about planning a career. 47. Write “thank you” notes. 17. Plan a career. 48. Go to a house of worship. 18. Get together with friends from work. 49. Celebrate a friend’s religious holiday. 19. Take tours of friends’ jobs. 50. Talk about relationships. 20. Visit a local technical school. 51. Talk about personal values. 21. Visit a community college. 52. Talk about the future. 22. Talk about college. From The National Mentoring Partnership Web site, 23. Have your friends talk about college. www.mentoring.org. and used by permission. 24. Sit in on some evening classes. 25. Work on applications together. 26. Explore financial aid options. Do you have other ideas that you would like to 27. Work on a resume. share with other YCP Mentors? Please contact the RPM Coordinator at 1-866-477-0156. 28. Talk about dressing for success. 29. Do a pretend job interview. 30. Talk about how to look for a job. 20 31. Talk about where to find a job.
  22. 22.  22 Ideas for Writing Your Youth (one for each week of the Residential Phase) & 35 Post Residential Activity Suggestions: 1. Encourage them to stick with it for at 1. Go out for dinner together. least the first four 2. Go to a movie. weeks. 3. Make dinner together. 2. Share a challenge you've had and how or if you overcame it. 4. Make popcorn and talk. 3. Exchange Favorites (colors, music, foods, 5. Give a tour of your current job. movies, etc.). 6. Learn about pop music. 4. Exchange Birthdays. 7. Figure out how to program your VCR. 5. Ask how they did on their fitness test. 8. Shoot some hoops. 6. Plan an activity or meeting for their first 9. Go to the library together. liberty home. 10. Just hang out. 7. Ask what their most fun and least fun subject is and share yours. 11. Go to a concert. 8. Share hobbies and interests. 12. Tackle some homework. 9. Exchange ideas about mentoring goals. 13. Talk about life. 10. Ask who their favorite staff members are and 14. Talk about your very first job. ask why. 15. Talk about balancing a budget. 11. Ask about their volunteer service. 16. Talk about planning a career. 12. Help them keep up to date with current events 17. Plan a career. by writing about them or sending news or magazine clippings. 18. Talk about living within one’s means. 13. Ask what friends they've made since they've 19. Talk about credit cards. been at Seaborne. 20. Go bargain hunting. 14. Ask what progress they are making on their 21. Visit a local technical school. PRAP and directions they are leaning. Share your educational, work, and military experience. 22. Talk about college. 15. Share your resume. 23. Have your friends talk about college. 16. Ask about their Prom plans and plan an 24. Sit in on some evening classes. activity or meeting for Prom liberty. Emphasize 25. Work on applications together. visits to schools, employers, etc. pertaining to their PRAP. 26. Plan a week’s worth of meals. 17. Pass on a good joke. 27. Do a week’s grocery shopping together. 18. Share your experience in balancing work and 28. Go holiday shopping. life. 29. Write “thank you” notes. 19. Plan some 1st month activities! 30. Go to a house of worship. 20. Ask what areas they have been and where they 31. Work on a resume. hope to travel one day. Share your travel 32. Talk about dressing for success. experiences. 33. Do a pretend job interview. 21. Share your ideas about what it takes to get ahead and ask for their ideas. 34. Talk about personal values. 22. Congratulate them on making it this far! 35. Talk about the future.
  23. 23. 21
  24. 24. X. Listening…An Essential Tool Genuine listening is hard work. Listening requires, first of all that we are not preoccupied, for if we are we can not fully attend. Secondly, listening involves hearing the way things are being said, the tone used, the expressions and gestures used. Listening also include the effort to hear what is not being said, what is only hinted at, and what perhaps is being held back. We hear with our ears, but we listen with our eyes and mind and heart and guts. When people feel they are being listened to they will express them selves more openly. Good listening helps identify problems and encourages respect and trust. The Helping Skill Goals: A. To help friends avoid problems B. To help friends work through problems C. To give friends support Steps of the skill and key phrases: 1. State your concern. (“You look…”) (“You sound…”) (“I saw….”) 2. Identify the problem. (“What’s been happening?”) (“How have you been feeling?”) 3. Explore alternatives. (“What ideas do you have?”) (“Have you though about…?”) 4. Predict consequences (“What would happen if you did that?”) (“Is that a problem for anyone else?”) 5. Find out what the person is going to do. 6. Express support. (“Let me know if you need me.”) (“I’ll call you next week to see how things went.”) If you don’t understand exactly what the person is trying to say, then try clari-phrasing it. Example: (“So what you’re saying is …………, is that right?) In other words merely restate what your interpretation of what was said to make it clearer. This shows that you are listening and that you understand what the person is saying. Barriers to the Helping Skill 1. Difference in values and attitudes - effective friends are accepting, nonjudgmental and open. Limited Ability – if the problem is obviously above your level of expertise, your job is to let your friend know that he needs additional help and to assist them in getting it. If you feel that you can’t help the person, then explain why not. (“I’d like to help, but I…”) 2. Limits of time and energy – be sure you have enough time for your Mentee. Schedule visits when you are rested and not rushed for time. 22 Mentor Activity #1 “Who am I?”
  25. 25. Who did you interview?__________________________________ Did you learn something important about them? What was it? _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ Mentor Activity #2 “Pushing the Envelope” Could you share your deepest secret with your Mentee? ____ Mentor Activity #3 “Who was a Mentor to you?” _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ Who was a Mentor to your partner in this activity? _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ 23
  26. 26. Notes: _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ ____________________________________ 24
  27. 27. _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ ________________________________ 25
  28. 28. _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________ ________________________________ 26
  29. 29. XII. MENTOR REMINDERS 1. While the cadet is with you during the Residential or Post Residential Phases, there are certain rules that we ask you to follow. The Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Academy and any activities sponsored by the program are tobacco free environments. We ask that you refrain from smoking in front of your cadet and giving any tobacco products to the cadet. ABSOLUTELY NO TOBACCO AND NO ALCOHOL SHOULD EVER BE GIVEN! Cadets are to always remain in PROPER uniform during the Residential Phase! 2. We encourage mentors to attend all mentor visits and to write their cadets often. We understand that everyone has personal obligations that are priority. Please notify your PRA if you cannot make a scheduled Mentor visit. 3. HYCA offers several ways to communicate with your Mentee which include: a. Writing - When writing (post card, letter, cards) your cadet during the Residential Phase please use this address and format: (10 Labels provided) Hoosier Youth Challenge Academy Cadet _________________________, Platoon ________ P.O. Box 9 Edinburgh, IN 46124 b. Email – Mentors may email your Cadet short words of encouragement and letters via this email address. Please do not send junk mail or chain letters to this address. The email address is: www.hoosieryouth@gmail.com Place your title, name and Cadet’s name in the subject field as: Subject: “MENTOR” Name – Cadet Smith c. Phone – Although you cannot call your Cadet they will have the opportunity to contact you by phone once a month. Please ensure your PRA has the best time to reach you on file.
  30. 30. 27 MENTOR REPORTING METHODS: Again, we should receive your MMR no later than (NLT) the 10th of each month. The following are currently the only methods available to submit your report to the PRA. MMR Post Card - represents contacts and concerns for the prior month. This method 1. is used for Mentors that do not have internet access. Please mail the MMR no later than the 7th so that we receive it no later than the 10th of the reporting month PLEASE. Emailing the MMR to your PRA. Email addresses are listed on page 29 of this 2. training manual. The Mentor Report can also be downloaded on our website! Online Reporting – Optional based on your internet availability. 3. All Primary Mentors will obtain usernames and passwords after the screening process has completed to access the Cadet Achievement website discussed in training via a secure website https://achievement.ngcp.org. You must not change your password or we may not be able to retrieve it if you need assistance in the future with report submission. If you experience technical problems with submitting this report please contact your PRA immediately. Via Fax – “PREFERRED METHOD” If you prefer to fax your MMR post card or form, 4. you may send it to: 812-314-8202 Please address it to your PRA’s attention. *Please remember to update the address and phone numbers for either you or your Cadet/Mentee if needed immediately! Examples of these Mentor Reporting Methods are listed on the following pages for your reference. If you have questions or concerns please contact your PRA for assistance or the RPM Coordinator at 1-866-477-0156. 28
  31. 31. MMR – Monthly Mentor Report Month of ____/____ 2009 Spoke with: Cadet Mentor Parent/Relative Recruiter Other Cadet Name                            Class # ______ Address                               Mentor Email                           Current Address                                                                                                                                                               Number, type of contacts, and dates of contact between Mentors & Cadets: Face to face:        Telephone:      Email:      Mail:      Dates: Reason: Any placements: List below Employment (Go to section A) Education (Go to section B) Military (Go to section C) Section A: Employment (attach a copy of the check stub(s) for each employer) What type of work:                     Name of Employer:                      Contact at work:                     Phone number:                           (Please check - Employment 1) Part-time Hours per week:      Wage Rate:$       per       Date of Hire:        Full-time Reason for termination:                      If terminated: Date of Termination:      What type of work:                      Name of Employer:                  Contact at work:                                            Phone number:      (Please check - Employment 2) Part-time Hours per week:      Wage Rate:$       per       Date of Hire:       Full-time If terminated: Date of Termination:           Reason for termination:                      Section B: Education (attach a copy of the school schedule or admission letter each semester) School type (ex: 2 yr, 4 yr, VoTech):                      Status:                          Name of School:                           Start Date:            End Date:            Notes:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 Section C: Military (Please check all that apply) Military Status: Active National Guard Reserve Military Branch: ANG ARNG USA USAF USCG USMC USN       Basic Training Ship Date and location: _____________________________ MEPS/Enlistment Date:            Have you had any contact from your cadet? ______________________________ Delayed Entry Date:      Discharge Date:                 Reason: ______________________________________________________________ Notes:                                                                                                                                                                                        RPM Dept. Staff Only: Please check if you had to receive this report over the phone from the mentor
  32. 32. Date Received: __________ Name of reporter: _________________ Relationship to Cadet: ___________ 29 2. MMR Post Card for Month of _____/_____/ 2009 *This report will be in a post card format. This report has been enlarged for training manual purposes only. Spoke with: Cadet Mentor Parent/Relative Recruiter Other __________ Cadet Name                          Class Cadet Email Address                               Mentor Email                    ___ Current Address                                                                       Number and type of contacts with Mentor: Face to face:      Telephone:      Email:      Mail:      Dates: Reason: Any placements: Employment (Go to section A) Education (Go to section B) Military (Go to section C) Section A: Employment What type of work:                     Name of Employer:                     Contact at work:                     Phone number:                          Wage Rate:$      per       Full-time Part-time Hours per week:      Date of Hire:           If terminated: Date of Termination:           Reason for termination:                     Section B: Education School type (ex: 2 yr, 4 yr, VocTech):                     Status:                          Name of School:                          Start Date:                 End Date:      Notes:                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Section C: Military Military Status: Active National Guard Reserve Military Branch: ANG ARNG USA USAF USCG USMC USN Enlistment Date:           Delayed Entry Date:           Discharge Date:                Reason: ____________________________________________________ Notes:                                                                                                                                                                                 *This may look different in post card format.
  33. 33. 33 Automated Mentor Reporting Overview - Introduction to Automated Mentor Reporting through the PRAP site. Cadet Achievement and the new automated Post-Residential Action Plan (PRAP) and Goal Development and Action Planning process, is a web based on-line application that allows Cadets, with aid and instruction of program staff, to develop, modify, and maintain his or her PRAP. Mentors are able to use the system to update Cadet and Mentor contact information, submit monthly mentor reports, and have “read only” access to the Cadet’s PRAP. Access As a part of the PRAP and Mentor Reporting Cadet Achievement application the HYCA MIS will provide usernames and passwords to Primary Mentors who will access the Cadet Achievement via a secure website at https://achievement.ngcp.org. Primary Mentors are designated by Cadets and Parents by week 3. Mentors (Primary) will have access to view PRAPs and submit Mentor reports monthly to the designated Post Residential Advisor assigned to the Cadet. . The MIS will also customize the PRAP document, which includes the document title, program logo, length of the Cadet’s Post-Residential Planning Calendar, and whether Staff and/or Cadets have “write” access to the PRAP document. Mentor Reporting The Mentor, through the Cadet Achievement application (https://achievement.ngcp.org) views his or her Cadet’s PRAP and submits monthly Mentor Reports by selecting from a drop down menu which covers the reporting month period. During a monthly reporting period, the Mentor can logon, enter Contact and/or Placement data and either save the report for submission later or send the report to the Case Manager. Once the report is sent to the Case Manager, that specific monthly report is no longer available to the Mentor for that reporting month; however, the Case Manager may edit information submitted by the Mentor. When the Case Manager is reviewing a Mentor Report, any changes to contact information for the Cadet or Mentor is highlighted in green. Once accepted, changes made by the Mentor for contact information, as well as Contacts between the Mentor and Cadet and Placement information, will populate the DMARS data base. This feature will preclude additional DMARS data entry. PRAP Philosophy The philosophy of the PRAP process is one of goal development and action planning for the Residential and Post-Residential Phases. The process begins in Week 3, with the requirement for each Cadet to begin establishing and developing Residential goals for each of the eight core components. By Week 13, Cadets begin establishing of Long Term Career goals and the Intermediate goals necessary to support them. Cadets are required to establish goals that meet SMART criteria, answering yes or no to the following questions: Is your goal Specific? Is your goal Measurable? Is your goal Attainable? Is your goal Realistic? Is your goal Time-Bound? It is expected that SMART criteria will be covered in classroom instruction. Cadets also are required to identify the outcomes, methods, barriers, resources and strategies associated with goal achievement. In the PRAP workbook and/or online, Cadets answer the following questions regarding their goals: What is your goal? (Outcomes) Explain the steps necessary to achieve your goal. (Methods) Explain what might keep you from reaching your goal? (Barriers) Who or what will support you in reaching your goal? (Resources) Explain what steps you will take to overcome what is keeping you from reaching your goal. (Strategies)
  34. 34. 34 As goals are developed by each Cadet, Staff may logon and review them. Staff will also answer the five SMART questions regarding the Cadets goals. At the bottom of each goal there is an opportunity for Staff to record notes that are visible to the Cadet. Another “Staff Notes only” field is available and viewable only by selected Staff members as designated by the MIS. In Week 3 the PRAP process begins. Once Goals are developed Cadets will self report on the attainment of each of the eight core component Residential Goals. Feedback on the Self reporting process is encouraged to aid in coaching Cadets on goal setting. Once a goal is achieved, the Cadet must establish another goal. During the Residential Phase Cadets are required to have an active goal against each of the eight core components. The goal history is maintained and may be viewed by the Cadet and Staff. By Week 13, Cadets are required to begin the establishment of Long-Term goals and the Intermediate Goals necessary to support the Long-Term Goal. The goal review process by Staff for Intermediate and Long-Term Goals is the same as for the Residential Goals review. At any time during the Residential or Post-Residential Phases, the Cadet’s PRAP is viewable by Mentor or Parents providing access has been granted by the program. For Intermediate and Long Term goals, Cadets may enter “Other” goals that may or may not be related to the Long Term Goal. One example is if a Cadet wants to carry forward one or more of the Residential Goals such as Service to the Community or Physical Fitness into his or her Post-Residential activities. Other goals may also include back up goals in case the primary goal become unattainable. The Automated PRAP is available online to the Cadets for the full 12 month Post-Residential Phase. Graduates, in conjunction with his or her Mentor and/or Case Manager may continue to modify or change the PRAP and use the document as an online resource following graduation. If for some reason the Cadet does not have Internet access to the PRAP, designated staff members such as a Case Manager has “write” access to the PRAP so it can be updated to accurately reflect the graduates goals. Other features of the Automated PRAP include the ability to enter applicant goals and work history that are normally captured during the application process. Having work history available will aid the Cadet in creating a viable resume that may be used in the placement process. Two other features that are carried forward from the previous PRAP include the Cadet’s Post-Residential Planning Calendar used to outline daily activities following graduation, and the Placement Options matrix, which is used to list three possible placements with the advantages, disadvantages and resources required to support each placement option. The PRAP paper copy process may be used if Cadets or Mentors do not have Internet access for the purpose of reviewing the Cadet’s PRAP as well as submitting monthly Mentor Reports. Log in with your screen name and password provided by the MIS. After logging in the following screen appears: 35
  35. 35. On the left in the “PRAP” menu the Mentor can view the Cadet’s PRAP workbook. If the Mentor has more than one Cadet, a drop down is available to select the Cadet’s PRAP. The “Administration” menu is where the Mentor can change his or her password. The “Mentor Report” menu is used to update contact data (i.e. address, phone number and email), as well as to submit Residential and Post-Residential Contact Reports. Automated Mentor Reporting: After selecting a Cadet for which to submit a Mentor Report the following screen appears: On this screen (above) changes to the Mentor or Cadet contact data can be made. After selecting “Update contact information and continue” at the bottom of the page, the following screen appears: 36
  36. 36. This is the screen where contact and placement information are inputted for a given month. When you first enter, the default month is PR month 1, but you can select other months using the dropdown menu in the upper right-hand corner. The “current” PR month is annotated in the drop down menu. To report a Contact with a cadet select “Add Contact Information” and the following appears: Input the date of your contact either manually or by clicking on the box to the right of the “contact date” field. Select the contact type from the drop down menu and enter any notes that may apply in the text box below it. If additional contacts are made within the same month, they can be inputted by clicking the “Add Additional Information” link. 37
  37. 37. The same reporting protocol applies to the other “Placement” options shown on the Report page. At the bottom of the reports page the Cadet’s Long Term Goal is displayed and the Mentor answers the question “Is the Cadet on target with the PRAP goals?” After inputting all desired data, the following options are available at the bottom of the page: 1. “Save this report and submit later” This allows the Mentor to return to the website and add additional contact or placement information at a later date. 2. “Send this report to the PRA” When this option is selected the Mentor can no longer submit any additional Contacts or Placements for this Post Residential month. Only the PRA or designated staff members can make changes or add information for the PR month. 3. “Discard Changes” Clears all information entered during this session. 38
  38. 38. After “Continue” is selected the Mentor is returned to the home page. The process ends with the Mentor selecting “Logout” Your report will be submitted to your assigned PRA. 39
  39. 39. HYCA Mentoring RESOURCES For more information on the CareGivers Choice-Mentoring Children of Prisoners program that the HYCA has • partnered with please visit http://www.mentoring.org/caregiverschoice • A comprehensive SafetyNet Manual is posted at http://www.mentoring.org/safetynet/. This manual contains complete information on volunteer screening, the details and procedures of the program and pertinenet forms. Any mentoring organization that is considering applying for the CareGivers Choice-Mentoring Children of Prisoners program should visit this site. • Becker, J. 1994. Mentoring High-Risk Kids. Minneapolis: Johnson Institute-QVS, Inc. • Brendtro, L. Brokenleg, M., & VanBockern, S. 1990. Reclaiming Youth at Risk: Our Hope for the Future. Bloomington, IN: National Educational Services. • National Mentoring Working Group, convened by United Way of America and One to One/The National Mentoring Partnership, 1991. • Rhodes, J.E. (2002). Stand by me: The risks and rewards of mentoring today’s youth. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. • http://www.edmentoring.org/pubs/going_the_distance.pdf • Matches can participate in service-learning activities (group or individual). See the Learn and Serve America Web site for more information on service learning http://www.learnandserve.org/ • The Mentoring Answer Book The perfect resource for the new mentor who is full of enthusiasm and anxious to do the right things http://www.mentoringanswerbook.com/index1.html • A great collection of resources on creating safe “virtual volunteering” services can be found online at: http://www.serviceleader.org/new/virtual/index.php • Bowman, R.P., and Bowman, S.C. (1997). Co-piloting: A systematic mentoring program for reaching and encouraging young people. • Chapin, SC: YouthLight. Nelson, F.W. (2001). In good company: Tools to help youth and adults talk. Minneapolis, MN: Search Institute. Platt, S., Pappas, J., Serfustini, E., and Riggs, K. (1999). Connect! Learning activities to strengthen assets. Cedar City, UT: Cedar Express Printing & Graphics. • Webster, B.E. (2000). Get real. Get a mentor: How you can get to where you want to go with the help of a mentor. Folsom, CA: EMT Group. • Kids Helping Kids: A Peer Helping and Peer Mediation Training Manual for Elementary and Middle School Teachers and Counsellors, by Trevor Cole (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: Peer Systems Consulting Group, www.peer.ca,1999). If you are aware of any valuable mentoring resources that other HYCA Mentors may be interested in please contact the HYCA RPM Coordinator at 1-866-477-0156. Thank you for serving an Indiana Hoosier Youth ChalleNGe Cadet! Refer a friend to the HYCA. MentoringWorks. 40

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