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Teaching Evidence-Based Management Through Learning Activities

Presentation by Alessandra Capezio and Patrick L’Espoir Decosta, CEBMa Annual Meeting 2018, Chicago

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Teaching Evidence-Based Management Through Learning Activities

  1. 1. Alessandra Capezio & Patrick L’Espoir Decosta Title EBMgt Learning Activities
  2. 2. Outline 2 • Share our EBP capabilities framework. • Example learning activities to support the development of EBP capabilities.
  3. 3. 3 Developed by Alessandra Capezio & Patrick L’Espoir Decosta Design: Camilo Potocnjak-Oxman
  4. 4. Learning Outcomes 1. Describe Evidence-based practice (EBP) in Management and its basic principles and its core and functional capabilities. 2. Identify problems that require decision-making based on knowledge of research fundamentals and EBP principles and capabilities (ASK) 3. Establish the search strategy to acquire the best available evidence relevant to the problem (ACQUIRE) 4. Ascertain the methodological appropriateness, quality, and trustworthiness of evidence (APPRAISE) 5. Integrate different types of relevant evidence towards finding solutions to the problem (AGGREGATE) 6. Generate and implement best solutions to the problem with due consideration of their social and ethical implications (APPLY) 7. Evaluate feedback obtained on applied solutions for necessary adjustment (ASSESS) 8. Generate insights and decision-making awareness through self-reflection (ASSESS) 4
  5. 5. EBP Capability Cognitive processes Learning activities - example Ask  Metacognition  Problem identification  Causal analysis  Question specification • Surfacing assumptions activity Acquire  Information retrieval  Apply search strategies  Assess methodologically appropriateness of methods as per source • Mini-CAT Appraise  Methodological appropriateness  Methodological quality • Mini-CAT Aggregate  Probabilistic reasoning • Mini-CAT • Evidence maps and gaps Apply  Conditional thinking  Apply contextual knowledge • From evidence to practice • Implementation plans • Logic models Assess  Critical reflection  Close metacognitive loop • Decision post-mortems • AARs 5
  6. 6. Surfacing assumptions 6 • Assumed problem • Organisational consequences • Underlying cause(s) • Causal mechanism(s)
  7. 7. Example: Open-plan offices 7
  8. 8. Open-plan offices - Assumptions 8 • What is the claim being made regarding open-plan offices by senior managers? • What is the assumed problem? • Consequences of open-plan offices? • Assumed causal mechanism(s)? • Is there any evidence to support claim?
  9. 9. 1. Start with a statement/strong belief/claim that a manager has or senior managers have about a particular problem or practical issue. Could start with a case. 2. Formulate a question to establish what is known in the scientific literature about the problem/practical issue/opportunity. 3. Students search for at least 5 scientific studies in teams (prioritising meta-analysis or systematic reviews) and rate the trustworthiness of the studies, distil the key findings and implications for practice. Mini-CATs 9
  10. 10. Based on our evidence, how sure can you be that the assumed cause has led to an observed effect? How do you know? How trustworthy is your evidence?? Critical appraisal of evidence 10
  11. 11. Critical appraisal of evidence 11Source: CEBMa
  12. 12. Evidence maps or gaps 12
  13. 13. • Students take the findings of a meta-analysis or systematic review, mini-CAT, CAT, evidence map, and develop an implementation plan based on the findings. • Students need to pay particular attention to the practical implications. • Students need to address the following questions:  How would you apply these findings to practice?  What would be some important considerations or boundary conditions in implementation? From evidence to practice (1) 13
  14. 14. 1. Stage 1 of applying evidence to practice: Identifying evidence-based solutions  What can be done by organisations to manage the problem?  Are there studies that support the effectiveness of these interventions? 2. Stage 2 of applying evidence to practice: feasibility, risks, and boundary conditions  Does the evidence for your interventions have ecological validity or applicability in the context?  What barriers and constraints (including operating constraints) exist to implementing these interventions?  What are the most feasible interventions? 3. Stage 3 and 4 of applying evidence to practice: decision, implementation, assessment  Complete the logic model overleaf and identify any appropriate outcome measures. From evidence to practice (2) 14
  15. 15. Logic model template 15 Project/Interventions: Goal: INPUTS ACTIVITIES OUTCOMES What we invest Implementation: What we do Participants short-term results: Learning intermediate results: Action long-term results: conditions OUTCOME MEASURES: Assess & evaluate performance and achievement of program objectives Assumptions Internal & External Challenges

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  • HarryArtoeGkornean

    Oct. 13, 2019

Presentation by Alessandra Capezio and Patrick L’Espoir Decosta, CEBMa Annual Meeting 2018, Chicago

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