Macropruden+al	  Policy,	  	     Countercyclical	  Bank	  Capital	  Buffers	  and	  Credit	  Supply:	  Evidence	  from	  th...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	               One	  so...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	            Experimenta...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                   Dyna...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                     Ba...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	      Benchmark	  loan-...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
23	  
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                     Po...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	           Policy	  sho...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	      Policy	  shock	  ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                Policy	...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	          Crisis	  shoc...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	         Crisis	  shock...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	         Crisis	  shock...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	         Crisis	  shock...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	         Crisis	  shock...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Numbers	  •     The	  ra+o	  of	  general	  provisions	  to	  total	  credit	  subject	  to	  the	  general	  provision	  ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                Amount	...
Introduc+on	  –	  Policy	  shocks	  –	  Empirical	  Strategy	  –	  Results	  –	  Conclusions	  	  	                       ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Macroprudential Policy, Countercyclical Bank Capital Buffers and Credit Supply: Evidence from the Spanish Dynamic Provisioning Experiments

1,142 views

Published on

Gabriel Jiménez (Banco de España)

Steven Ongena (Tilburg)

José­‐Luis Peydró (UPF and Barcelona GSE)

Jesús Saurina (Banco de España)

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,142
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
25
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Macroprudential Policy, Countercyclical Bank Capital Buffers and Credit Supply: Evidence from the Spanish Dynamic Provisioning Experiments

  1. 1. Macropruden+al  Policy,     Countercyclical  Bank  Capital  Buffers  and  Credit  Supply:  Evidence  from  the  Spanish  Dynamic  Provisioning  Experiments   Gabriel  Jiménez    (Banco  de  España)     Steven  Ongena    (Tilburg)   José-­‐Luis  Peydró    (UPF  and  Barcelona  GSE)   Jesús  Saurina    (Banco  de  España)   Barcelona GSE IX Trobada – IAE CSIC – 21st October 2011
  2. 2. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Macropruden+al  policy  and  credit  cycles  •  Macropruden+al  policy  aims  at  reducing  the  poten+ally  strong   nega+ve  externali+es  from  the  financial  to  the  macro-­‐real  sector  •  A  key  channel  is  “excessive”  bank  pro-­‐cyclicality/  credit  cycles  due  to   financial  fric+ons  in:   –  Banks  (credit  supply):    Holsmtrom  and  Tirole  (QJE,  1997),  Allen  and  Gale   (2000  and  2007),  Diamond  and  Rajan  (JPE  2001  and  AER  2006),  Adrian  and   Shin  (AER,  2010  and  Handbook  of  ME,  2011),  Shleifer  and  Visnhy  (JFE  &  AER,   2010),  Kindleberger  (1978),  Tirole  (2011),  Gersbach  and  Rochet  (2011)…   –  Non-­‐financial  sector  (credit  demand):    Bernanke  and  Gertler  (AER,   1989),  Kiyotaki  and  Moore  (JPE,  1997),  Lorenzoni  (RES,  2008),  Jeanne  and   Korinek  (2011)…   Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   2  
  3. 3. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Credit  supply  cycles    •  “Excessive”  bank  pro-­‐cyclicality  /credit  supply  cycles  due  to  bank   fric+ons   –  In  good  +mes:   •  Problem:    too  high  credit  supply/sof  lending  standards  (seeds   for  the  next  crisis)  since  e.g.  have  lihle  capital  at  stake   –  In  bad  +mes:   •  Problem:    credit  crunch  by  banks  due  to  e.g.  low  capital  buffers  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   3  
  4. 4. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       One  solu+on:  countercyclical  bank  capital  buffers?  •  Higher  bank  capital  standards  in  good  +mes  (and  lower  standards  in   bad  +mes)  can  be  beneficial  both  in  good  and  bad  +mes  by  reducing   “excessive”  bank  pro-­‐cyclicality  in  credit  supply   –  In  good  +mes:   •  Problem:  too  high  bank  credit  supply/sof  lending  standards   •  Solu+on:  banks  should  hold  more  capital  (“skin  in  the  game”)  to   internalize  poten+al  loan  costs/externali+es.  On  the  other  hand,  bank   capital  may  be  too  costly   –  In  bad  +mes:   •  Problem:  credit  crunch  by  banks  due  to  low  capital  buffers   •  Solu+on:  higher  bank  capital  buffers  built  in  good  +mes  to  support   credit  in  bad  +mes  (without  government  help)  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   4  
  5. 5. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Policy:    the  ra+onale  of  Basel  III  on     higher  capital  and  countercyclical  buffers  •   “The  new  [capital]  standards  will  markedly  reduce  banks’   incenDve  to  take  excessive  risks…  lower  the  likelihood  and   severity  of  future  crises,  and  enable  banks  to  withstand  -­‐   without  extraordinary    government  support  -­‐  stresses  of  a   magnitude  associated  with  the  recent  financial  crisis.”      G-­‐20  Seoul  Official  statement,  November  2010  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   5  
  6. 6. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       The  bankers  think  differently  •   “More  equity  might  increase  the  stability  of  banks.  At  the  same  Dme   however,  it  would  restrict  their  ability  to  provide  loans  to  the  rest  of   the  economy.  This  reduces  growth  and  has  negaDve  effects  for  all”     Josef  Ackermann,  CEO  of  Deutsche  Bank  (Nov  20,  2009)    •  “The  BriDsh  Bankers  AssociaDon  ...  calculated  that  demands  by   internaDonal  banking  regulators  in  Basle  that  they  bolster  their   capital  will  require  the  UKs  banking  industry  to  hold  an  extra  £600bn   of  capital  that  might  otherwise  have  been  deployed  as  loans  to   businesses  or  households”     The  Observer  (July  11,  2010)    •  “Excess  bank  equity  capital  ...  would  consDtute  a  buffer  that  is  not   otherwise  available  to  finance  producDvity-­‐enhancing  capital   investment”   Greenspan  (FT,  July  27,  2011)  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   6  
  7. 7. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Ques+on   •  What  are  the  effects  of  countercyclical  bank  capital   buffers  on  credit  supply?     –  More  generally:    Bank  capital  impact  on  credit  supply?   –  Good  vs.  crisis  +mes?   –  Bank  and  firm  heterogeneity?   –  Real  effects?    Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   7  
  8. 8. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Theory   •  The  two  complementary  ra+onales  of  bank  capital  (beher   incen+ves  and  buffers  in  crisis)  and  the  poten+al  costs  via  a   credit  supply  reduc+on  highlighted  by  policy  makers  and  by  the   bankers  respec+vely  are  also  present  in  theore+cal  models:     –  e.g.  Holmström  and  Tirole,  QJE  1997;  Morrison  and  White,  AER  2005;   Diamond  and  Rajan,  JF  2000-­‐JPE  01-­‐AER  06;  Gale  and  Özgür,  JEEA  2005…   •  And  even  the  countercyclical  buffer,  e.g.  in  models:   –  with  agency  problems  (e.g.  Tirole,  2011;  Gersbach  and  Rochet,  2011)     –  without  agency  problems  but  with  investor  sen+ment  (e.g.  Shleifer  and   Vishny,  JFE  2010  and  AER  2010)  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   8  
  9. 9. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Empirical  iden+fica+on   •  To  iden+fy  the  effects  of  countercyclical  bank  capital  buffers   on  credit  supply  (in  good  and  bad  +mes)  is  needed  both:   1.  Shocks  to  countercyclical  bank  capital  buffers   2.  Comprehensive  loan-­‐level  data  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   9  
  10. 10. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Experimental  seQng:    Spain  and  dynamic  provisioning  •  Spain  1999-­‐2010  offers  an  almost  ideal  seung  for  iden+fica+on:     1.  Policy  experiments  with  dynamic  provisioning  exogenously  changed   banks’  retained  profits  in  good  +mes  to  be  used  during  crisis  +mes   Ø  Exploit  policy  shocks  in  good  +mes:    contrac+onary  introduc+on  in  mid   2000  and  expansionary  change  in  mid  2005   Ø  Exploit  provision  buffers  and  a  policy  shock  with  the  recent  crisis  shock   Ø  Capital:  over  and  above  than  provisions  for  specific  and  general  losses   2.  Comprehensive  credit  register  (matched  with  bank  and  firm   characteris+cs)  to  iden+fy  credit  availability   Ø  Difference-­‐in-­‐differences  (banks  more/less  affected  by  shocks  and   before/afer  shocks)  controlling  for  +me-­‐varying  observed  and   unobserved  firm  heterogeneity  with  firm*+me  fixed  effects     Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   10  
  11. 11. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Preview  of  the  results  Countercyclical  capital  buffers    1.  Mi+gate  bank  credit  supply  cycles     –  They  strongly  contracted  credit  availability  (volume  and  cost)  during   good  +mes,  but  strongly  expanded  it  during  the  recent  crisis   •  Weaker  banks  more  affected  2.  Have  posi+ve  aggregate  firm-­‐level  real  effects   –  Firm  bank  credit  availability  and  real  variables  (almost)  NOT  affected   in  good  +mes     –  But  strong,  POSITIVE  impact  in  crisis  +mes  for  firm  credit  availability,   employment,  total  assets,  and  survival!  3.  Smaller  firms  more  benefited  in  crisis  +mes;  no  reduc+on  of   risk-­‐taking  in  good  +mes   Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   11  
  12. 12. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Outline  for  the  rest  of  the  talk   •  Policy  shocks:  dynamic  provisioning  experiments   –  How  does  it  work?   –  Different  policy  shocks  (2000  and  2005  and  2008)  and  the  crisis  shock   •  Empirical  strategy  and  data   –  Empirical  strategy   –  Loan,  firm  and  bank  datasets     •  Results   –  2000  policy  shock,  the  2005  one  and  the  2007-­‐2010  crisis   –  Loan-­‐  and  firm-­‐level  results   •  Conclusions   –  Implica+ons  for  Basel  III,  bank  bailouts,  monetary  policy  and,  in  general,  for   macropruden+al  policy  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   12  
  13. 13. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       The  introduc+on  of  dynamic  provisions   •  In  July  2000,  the  Banco  de  España  (Spain’s  central  bank,   banking  supervisor  and  responsible  for  bank  accoun+ng)  put   in  place  dynamic  provisions  due  to:   –  Spain  had  the  lowest  ra+o  of  loan  loss  provisions  to  total  loans   among  all  OECD  countries  in  1999     –  An  empirical  fact:  afer  strong  credit  growth  in  good  +mes   follows  high  NPLs  and  provisions  are  very  low  in  good  +mes  and   very  high  in  bad  +mes     (see  Saurina  et  al  (2000),  Saurina  (2009a)  and  Saurina  (2009b)  for   all  the  details  on  dynamic  provisioning)  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   13  
  14. 14. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Dynamic  provisions:  policy  shocks  and  basic  idea  •  Introduced  in  mid-­‐2000  (contrac+onary  shock)   –  modified  in  mid-­‐2005  (for  consistency  with  IFRS,  expansionary  shock)   –  modified  in  2008:Q4  (to  allow  banks  to  use  more  the  provision  funds   built  in  good  +mes)  •  Forward-­‐looking:  provisions  before  any  loss  arrives  •  Countercyclical:  Build  up  a  buffer  in  good  +mes  to  be  used  in  bad  +mes.   The   increase   of   provisioning   in   2000   was   over   and   above   specific   and   general   loan-­‐loss   provisions.   In   the   crisis   +mes,   there   is   a   regulatory   reduc+on  of  this  type  of  provisioning  è  neutral  over  the  cycle  •  Tier-­‐2  Capital   Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   14  
  15. 15. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       A  simple  countercyclical  mechanism  •  In   periods   of   expanding   credit,   a   buffer   of   provisions   is   being   built   up   to   be   used  in  crisis  +mes   –  We  analyze  the  introduc+on  in  2000  and  a  modifica+on  in  2005  •  In  periods  when  specific  losses  materialize  in  individual  loans  (crisis  +mes),  the   banks  can  draw  down  from  the  previously  built-­‐up  buffer  of  provisions   –  We  analyze  the  ex-­‐ante  pre-­‐crisis  built-­‐up  buffers  in  the  recent  crisis  •  The   Spanish   dynamic   provision   also   includes   an   upper   and   lower   limit   in   the   amount  of  the  fund  being  built   –  The  lower  limit  was  relaxed  in  the  crisis  and  we  also  exploit  this  policy  shock  •  Formula:    Automa+c  increase  of  dynamic  provisions  when  current  bank  NPLs   are  lower  than  average  value  over  the  cycle  (good  +mes);  a  decrease  when  it  is   higher   (crisis   +mes).   Same   formula   for   everybody   but   affected   differently   to   different  banks  depending  on  each  bank’s  loan  poryolio   Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   15  
  16. 16. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Empirical  iden+fica+on   •  Using  a  difference-­‐in-­‐difference  approach,  we  compare  bank   lending  before  and  afer  the  different  shocks:   –  policy  shocks  in  good  +mes:  introduc+on  in  mid-­‐2000  (and  change  in   2005)  of  the  new  regula+on     –  exploit  crisis  shock:  provision  funds  at  the  start  of  the  financial  crisis  in   August  2007  and  policy  change  of  the  lower  floor  of  provision  funds  in   2008:Q3   •  We  differen+ate  across  banks  with  varying  suscep+bility  to  the   shocks  and  employ  firm*+me  fixed  effects  to  control  for  +me-­‐ varying  observed  and  unobserved  firm  heterogeneity   fundamentals  à  iden+fy  credit  availability   –  control  also  for  other  key  bank  characteris+cs   –  all  margins  of  lending,  firm  and  bank  heterogeneity,  and  real  effects  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   16  
  17. 17. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Bank’s  suscep+bility  to  the  shocks:    Buffers       •  For  the  policy  shocks  in  good  +mes:     –  new  formula  applied  to  the  exis+ng  loan  poryolio  for  each  bank   yielding  a  bank-­‐specific  amount  of  new  funds  to  be  provisioned   (over  total  assets)   –  the  2005  policy  shock  changed  the  ini+al  weights  on  different   loans   •  For  the  crisis  shock:     –  how  much  each  bank  had  built  up  as  dynamic  (general)   provisions  just  prior  to  the  onset  of  the  crisis  (2006:IV)  over   total  assets   –  policy  change  of  lower  floor  of  provision  funds  in  2008:Q4   affects  more  the  banks  with  lowest  provision  funds  in  2008:Q3  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   17  
  18. 18. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Credit  register  •  Credit  register  from  Spain  matched  with  bank  and  firm  relevant   informa+on  (in  e.g.  2007:Q2:  100,000  firms,  175  banks,  600,000  loans)  •  Exhaus+ve  loan  (bank-­‐firm)  level  data  on  all  outstanding  business  loan   contracts  (including  loan  applica+ons)  at  a  quarterly  frequency  •  We  calculate  the  total  exposures  by  each  bank  to  each  firm  in  each   quarter  from  1999:I  to  2010:IV   –  The  sample  period  includes  one  year  before  the  ini+al  shock  (to  run  placebo   tests)  and  we  analyze  3  years  of  data  on  the  crisis    •  We  analyze  changes  in  (log)  credit  volume  (commitment  or  drawn),   maturity,  collateral  and  the  cost  of  lending  (proxied  by  the  percentage   of  drawing  down  to  total  commihed  loans)   –  Intensive  and  extensive  margin  of  lending  (also  loan  applica+ons)  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   18  
  19. 19. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Benchmark  loan-­‐  and  firm-­‐  level  equa+ons  and  hypotheses   !Creditb, f = ! + " f + #b + $ b, f•  Simple  model:  credit  change  due  to  a  (i)  secular  trend,  (ii)  firm  fundamentals/ demand  and  (iii)  bank  capital  shock  (credit  supply),  (iv)  idiosyncra+c  shock  •  LHS  is  change  (afer-­‐before  shock)  in  credit:  log  credit  volume  (commitment  or   drawn),  short-­‐term  loans,  collateralized  loans,  and  drawn  to  commihed  loans  •  Bank  capital  buffer  shocks  (called  buffers):     –  Good  +mes:  policy  shocks  of  mid  2000  and  mid  2005     –  Bad  +mes:  crisis  shock  with  pre-­‐crisis  provision  buffers  (from  2007:Q1)  and  policy   shock  in  2008:Q4  •  Buffers  is  our  main  variable  on  dynamic  provisions  (def.  on  previous  pages)   –  Firm*+me  fixed  effects  to  control  also  for  +me-­‐varying  unobserved  heterogeneity   –  Bank  controls  are  bank  size,  capital,  NPL,  ROA,  liquidity,  real  estate  exposure  and   bank  type  (commercial,  saving  and  coop  banks)  •  Es+mate  similar  firm-­‐level  regression  to  check  credit  subs+tu+on  &  real  effects   Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   19  
  20. 20. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Results:  summary  Countercyclical  capital  buffers    1.  Mi+gate  bank  credit  supply  cycles     –  They  strongly  contracted  credit  availability  (volume  and  cost)  during   good  +mes,  but  strongly  expanded  it  during  the  recent  crisis   •  Weaker  banks  more  affected  2.  Have  posi+ve  aggregate  firm-­‐level  real  effects   –  Firm  bank  credit  availability  and  real  variables  (almost)  NOT  affected   in  good  +mes     –  But  strong,  POSITIVE  impact  in  crisis  +mes  for  firm  credit  availability,   employment,  total  assets,  and  survival!  3.  Smaller  firms  more  benefited  in  crisis  +mes;  no  reduc+on  of   risk-­‐taking  in  good  +mes   Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   20  
  21. 21. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Our  contribu+ons   •  We  exploit  policy  shocks  to  bank  capital  (countercyclical   buffers)  both  in  good  and  bad  +mes  to  iden+fy  the  impact  of   bank  capital  on  credit  supply:   1.  Unique  (in  the  world)  policy  experiments  on  countercyclical   capital  buffers  taking  place  before  Basel  III  à  key  contribu+on     2.  In  Jiménez,  Ongena,  Peydró  and  Saurina  (AER,  2012)  we  find   that  credit  supply  is  pro-­‐cyclical  in  GDP  and  monetary   condi+ons  and  stronger  for  banks  with  a  lower  capital  ra+o   •  We  used  lagged  bank  capital.  But  bank  capital  is  a  key   strategic  variable  and  à  likely  endogenous   •  Our  innova+on:  to  exploit  the  policy  shocks  affec+ng  bank   capital:    causality  from  bank  capital  to  the  supply  of  credit  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   21  
  22. 22. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Conclusions  and  policy  implica+ons  •  Iden+fy  countercyclical  bank  capital  buffers  effects  on  credit  supply  •  Experimental  seung:  Spain  1999-­‐2010   –  Dynamic  provisioning  experiments  and  complete  credit  register  •  Results   –  Countercyclical  capital  buffers  mi+gate  credit  supply  cycles!!   –  Firms  are  more  affected  during  crisis  +mes  when  switching  from  banks   with  low  to  high  capital  buffers  is  difficult.  Posi+ve,  strong  real  effects!!   –  MM  does  not  hold  for  banks  and  crucial  for  macro  real  effects  •  Important  policy  implica+ons  for:   –  Basel  III,  current  debate  in  the  EU,  bank  bailouts,  monetary  policy  and,  in   general,  for  macropruden+al  policy   –  Individual  bank  capital  (not  only  aggregate)  mahers  in  crises!     22  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina  
  23. 23. 23  
  24. 24. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Policy  shock  of  July-­‐2000,  loan  level  data  &   difference  in  log  credit  volume   Similar  results  for  extensive  margin  and  for  credit  cost  and  maturity  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   24  
  25. 25. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Policy  shock  of  July-­‐2000,  loan  level  data  &     +me-­‐varying  coefficients  of  buffers  on  credit  volume   -./01%2304451% !"#$%&#()*+)% &#% &#(% &#)% &#$% &% !&#$% !&#)% !&#(% !&#% !"% !"#$% *+)% **+"% **+$% **+,% **+)% &&+"% &&+$% &&+,% &&+)% &"+"% &"+$% &"+,% &"+)% &$+"% &$+$% &$+,% &$+)% &,+"% &,+$% &,+,% &,+)% Also  for  credit  drawn,  extensive  margin  and  cost  and  maturity  with  similar  results  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   25  
  26. 26. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Policy  shock  of  July-­‐2000,  both  loan  &  firm  level  data     +me-­‐varying  coefficients  of  buffers  on  credit  volume   -./01%2304451% 677857095%2304451% !"#$%&#()*+)% &#% &#(% &#)% &#$% &% !&#$% !&#)% !&#(% !&#% !"% !"#$% *+)% **+"% **+$% **+,% **+)% &&+"% &&+$% &&+,% &&+)% &"+"% &"+$% &"+,% &"+)% &$+"% &$+$% &$+,% &$+)% &,+"% &,+$% &,+,% &,+)% Also  for  credit  drawn,  cost  and  maturity  with  similar  results  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   26  
  27. 27. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Policy  shock  of  July-­‐2000,  loan  level  data  &     +me-­‐varying  coefficients  of  buffers  on  credit  cost   !"#$%&()*)++,(-./0$1)/ "#)% "#"% "% !"#"% !"#)% !"#)% !"#(% !"#(% !"#&% !"#&% !"#$% **,)% "",)% "),)% "(,)% "&,)% *+,$% **,(% **,&% **,$% "",(% "",&% "",$% "),(% "),&% "),$% "(,(% "(,&% "(,$% "&,(% "&,&% "&,$%Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   27  
  28. 28. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Economic  effects  and  summary   •  An  increase  of  one  standard  devia+on  in  buffers  in  2000:II   reduces  the  commihed  volume  of  credit:   –  at  the  bank  (loan)  level:  by  4  percent     –  at  the  firm  level:  by  1.5  percent     •  Similar  results  for  credit  drawn,  cost  and  maturity  and  for   extensive  and  intensive  margin  and  for  the  2005  shock  (in  this   case  lower  elas+ci+es,  probably  due  to  an  expansionary   shock)  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   28  
  29. 29. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Crisis  shock,  pre-­‐crisis  buffers  &  low  buffers  when  policy   shock,  loan  level  data  &  difference  in  log  credit  volume   Similar  results  for  extensive  margin  and  for  credit  cost;  but  shorter  maturity  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   29  
  30. 30. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Crisis  shock,  pre-­‐crisis  buffers,  loan  level  data  &     +me-­‐varying  coefficients  of  buffers  on  credit  volume   Local  Channel   ΔLog  Commitment   0.450   0.400   0.350   0.300   0.250   0.200   0.150   0.100   0.050   0.000   -­‐0.050   07Q2   07Q3   07Q4   08Q1   08Q2   08Q3   08Q4   09Q1   09Q2   09Q3   09Q4  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   30  
  31. 31. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Crisis  shock,  low  buffers  &  policy  shock,  loan  level  data  &   +me-­‐varying  coefficients  of  buffers  on  credit  volume   Local  Channel   ΔLog  Commitment   0.140   0.120   0.100   0.080   0.060   0.040   0.020   0.000   -­‐0.020   07Q2   07Q3   07Q4   08Q1   08Q2   08Q3   08Q4   09Q1   09Q2   09Q3   09Q4  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   31  
  32. 32. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Crisis  shock,  low  buffers  &  policy  shock,  loan  level  data  &   +me-­‐varying  coefficients  of  buffers  on  credit  dropped   Loan  Dropped?   0.02   0.01   0   -­‐0.01   -­‐0.02   -­‐0.03   -­‐0.04   -­‐0.05   -­‐0.06   -­‐0.07   08Q1   09Q1   07Q2   07Q3   07Q4   08Q2   08Q3   08Q4   09Q2   09Q3   09Q4  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   32  
  33. 33. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Crisis  shock,  low  buffers  &  policy  shock,  loan  level  data  &   +me-­‐varying  coefficients  of  buffers  on  credit  cost   ΔDrawn-­‐to-­‐Commited  Ra+o   0.035   0.03   0.025   0.02   0.015   0.01   0.005   0   -­‐0.005   -­‐0.01   -­‐0.015   -­‐0.02   07Q2   07Q3   07Q4   08Q1   08Q2   08Q3   08Q4   09Q1   09Q2   09Q3   09Q4  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   33  
  34. 34. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Summary  of  economic  effects   •  An  increase  of  one  standard  devia+on  in  buffers  in  2006:IV   increases  the  commihed  volume  of  credit:   –  at  the  bank  (loan)  level:  by  almost  7  percent     –  at  the  firm  level:  by  at  most  5  percent   •  An  increase  of  one  standard  devia+on  in  buffers  in  2000:II   reduces  the  commihed  volume  of  credit:   –  at  the  bank  (loan)  level:  by  4  percent     –  at  the  firm  level:  by  1.5  percent    Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   34  
  35. 35. Numbers  •  The  ra+o  of  general  provisions  to  total  credit  subject  to  the  general  provision  at  the  end  of   2007  for  individual  balance  sheets  was  1.22%.  If  we  exclude  exposures  with  a  0%  weigh+ng,   the  coverage  ra+o  reaches  1.59%.  For  non-­‐consolidated  data  in  Spain,  the  general  provisions   were  78.9%  of  total  provisions  at  the  end  of  2007.    •  in  1999  the  loan-­‐loss  provisions  of  Spanish  banks  were  the  lowest  among  OECD  countries.  In   2006,  the  Spanish  banking  system  had  by  far  the  highest  coverage  ra+o  among  Western   European  countries,  at  255  percent  •  Counter-­‐cyclical  provisions  were  included  in  Tier  2  capital  i.e.  up  to  1.25  percent  of  risk-­‐   weighted  assets  §  Total   loan   loss   provisions   at   a   consolidated   level   at   the   end   of   2007   were   1.33%   of   total   consolidated  assets  §  The  ra+o  of  bank  capital  and  those  total  assets  was  5.78%    §  At   the   end   of   2007,   Spanish   banks   at   a   consolidated   level   had   1.20%   of   general   provisions   over  total  credit  granted   35  
  36. 36. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Summary  sta+s+cs  of  buffers   •  In  2000:II:   –  Buffers  has  an  average  of  0.46  and  the  standard  devia+on  is   0.09     –  Only  correlated  to  real  estate  exposure,  bank-­‐type  and   collateralized  loans.  Not  correlated  to  other  bank,  firm  and  loan   characteris+cs   •  In  2006:IV:     –  Average  of  pre-­‐crisis  buffers  is  1.1  and  the  standard  devia+on  is   0.21   –  Not  correlated  to  firm  and  loan  characteris+cs,  but  to  some   bank  characteris+cs  (not  to  bank  type)  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   36  
  37. 37. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Current  provisions   •  Specific   provisions   cover   incurred   losses   already   iden+fied   in   a   specific  loan   •  General   (dynamic)   provisions   cover   incurred   losses   not   yet   individually   iden+fied   in   a   specific   loan   through   a   collec+ve   assessment  for  impairment  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   37  
  38. 38. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Basic  formula   •  Currently,   Spain   has   specific   provisions   (dot.espe)   and   general   provisions  (dot.gen)     •  General  provisions  are  set  aside  according  to:   dot.espet dot.gent = αΔCt + ( β − )Ct Ct  Ct  is  the  stock  of  loans  and  ΔCt  its  varia+on    α  is  the  average  es+mate  of  the  credit  loss      β  is  the  historical  average  specific  provision  Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   38  
  39. 39. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Specific  mechanism   •  α  &  β  based  on  6  risk  classes  calibrated  with  historical  credit  data:   –  (0%;  0.6%;  1.5%;  1.8%;  2%;  2.5%)  for  α     –  (0%;  0.11%;  0.44%;  0.65%;  1.1%  y  1.64%)  for  β   •  Six  homogeneous  groups:   1.  zero  risk  (cash,  public  sector  debt)   2.  home  mortgages  with  LTV  below  80%,  corporates  with  ra+ng  A  or  above   3.  loans  with  real  guarantees  and  home  mortgages  with  LTV  above  80%   4.  rest  of  loans,  including  corporates  and  SMEs   5.  consumer  durables  financing   6.  credit  cards  and  overdrafs   6 ⎛ dot.espeit 6 ⎞ 6 ⎛ 6 ⎞dot.gent = ∑α i ΔCit + ∑ ⎜ β i − ⎜ ⎟Cit = ∑α i ΔCit + ⎜ ∑ β i Cit − dot.espet ⎟ ⎟ i =1 i =1 ⎝ Cit ⎠ i =1 ⎝ i =1 ⎠ •  Though   the   formula   is   the   same   for   all   banks,   it   affects   banks   differen+ally  (since  banks  have  different  loan  poryolios)   Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   39  
  40. 40. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Amount  of  total  net  loan  loss  provisions  (flow)     million  € 12.000 10.000 8.000 6.000 4.000 2.000 0 jun-­‐99 jun-­‐00 jun-­‐03 jun-­‐06 jun-­‐07 jun-­‐97 jun-­‐98 jun-­‐01 jun-­‐02 jun-­‐04 jun-­‐05 jun-­‐08 jun-­‐09 dic-­‐97 dic-­‐01 dic-­‐04 dic-­‐08 dic-­‐96 dic-­‐98 dic-­‐99 dic-­‐00 dic-­‐02 dic-­‐03 dic-­‐05 dic-­‐06 dic-­‐07Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   40  
  41. 41. Introduc+on  –  Policy  shocks  –  Empirical  Strategy  –  Results  –  Conclusions       Provision  funds  over  total  loans     Total  provisions Specific  provisions General  provisions % 2,5 2,0 1,5 1,0 0,5 0,0 Dec-­‐00 Dec-­‐01 Dec-­‐02 Dec-­‐03 Dec-­‐04 Dec-­‐05 Dec-­‐06 Dec-­‐07 Dec-­‐08 Dec-­‐09Gabriel  Jiménez,  Steven  Ongena,  José-­‐Luis  Peydró  and  Jesús  Saurina   41  

×