Lady Lights Present Minimalism EDAE A638:  The Facilitation of Learning with Technology
Minimalism in preparing and presenting for learning via Computer/Technology The Bare Necessities
MINIMALIST MODEL <ul><li>“ minimize the extent to which instructional materials obstruct the learning,  and focus the desi...
L E A R N E R S Use prior knowledge and experience to manage and assimilate new experiences
L E A R N E R S Learn by doing meaningful, self-contained activities Use prior knowledge and experience to manage and assi...
L E A R N E R S Learn by doing meaningful, self-contained activities Use prior knowledge and experience to manage and assi...
L E A R N E R S Use errors and recovery to learn Learn by doing meaningful, self-contained activities Use prior knowledge ...
L E A R N E R S Use errors and recovery to learn Learn by doing meaningful, self-contained activities Desire realistic lea...
L E A R N E R S Use errors and recovery to learn Learn by doing meaningful, self-contained activities Desire realistic lea...
DESIGN  PRINCIPLES Learner Centered
DESIGN  PRINCIPLES Learner Centered Get learner up and running ASAP
DESIGN  PRINCIPLES Learner Centered Get learner up and running ASAP Allow learner to think and improvise
DESIGN  PRINCIPLES Learner Centered Self-contained and independent Get learner up and running ASAP Allow learner to think ...
DESIGN  PRINCIPLES Learner Centered Focus on real work in training Self-contained and independent Get learner up and runni...
DESIGN  PRINCIPLES Learner Centered Make use of learner’s prior knowledge Focus on real work in training Self-contained an...
DESIGN  PRINCIPLES Learner Centered Make use of learner’s prior knowledge Focus on real work in training Self-contained an...
GOAL: facilitate  needs  of learners Adult learners want to build on prior knowledge without spending additional time with...
GOAL: facilitate  needs  of learners <ul><li>Remove anything that would hinder learners from moving forward as quickly as ...
DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>1.  Important information at  top  of page (Jones & Farquhar, 1997, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li...
DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>1.  Important information at  top  of page (Jones & Farquhar, 1997, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li...
DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>1.  Important information at  top  of page (Jones & Farquhar, 1997, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li...
DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>4.  Fit a page on  one screen  to eliminate scrolling  (Nielsen, 1996; Jones & Farquhar, 1997, c...
DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>4.  Fit a page on  one screen  to eliminate scrolling  (Nielsen, 1996; Jones & Farquhar, 1997, c...
DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>4.   Fit a page on  one screen  to eliminate scrolling  (Nielsen, 1996; Jones & Farquhar, 1997, ...
DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>5.  Pages balanced, readable, minimal     reduce excess  information  (Szabo, 1998, cited in Ca...
DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>5.  Pages balanced, readable, minimal     reduce excess  information  (Szabo, 1998, cited in Ca...
WEB-PAGE DESIGN ADVICE <ul><li>Design small </li></ul><ul><li>Keep effects simple </li></ul><ul><li>Map out whole site </l...
WEB-PAGE DESIGN ADVICE <ul><li>Get  feedback  from users </li></ul><ul><li>Test outside links regularly </li></ul><ul><li>...
Albert Einstein <ul><li>&quot;everything should be made as simple as possible, but no simpler.&quot;   </li></ul>(Hoch, 20...
Keep It Short and Simple <ul><li>Design  simplicity  should be a key goal and unnecessary complexity avoided. </li></ul><u...
C HARACTERISTICS IN EDUCATION <ul><li>Work more with the product and less with the documentation = greater success.  (Hofn...
C HARACTERISTICS IN EDUCATION <ul><li>Learner oriented focus </li></ul><ul><li>Primary requirement:  meaningful activity  ...
C HARACTERISTICS IN EDUCATION <ul><li>Omit long introductions </li></ul><ul><li>Omit repetition and verbiage.   </li></ul>
Example: Traditional Instructions <ul><li>THAWING BAGELS </li></ul><ul><li>It’s important to plan baking times carefully s...
Thawing Bagels 2008 Information Mapping, Inc. Example: Minimalist Instructions If you want to thaw the bagels in . . .  Th...
Instructions - Traditional Too many pictures and too much clutter.  It overwhelms and confuses the reader/user.
Instructions - Traditional Sometimes the layout can be more distracting than helpful, and can take longer to get through.
Instructions - Minimalist <ul><li>Open your Intranet  to open YKHC News  </li></ul><ul><li>Hover your mouse over Links and...
Minimalism in Architecture <ul><li>Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, a Modernist architect, effectively began the Minimalist archi...
Minimalism in Architecture <ul><li>Buildings are stripped of all but the most essential elements </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasi...
REFERENCES <ul><li>Craven, J. (2008). Picture Dictionary of Modern Architecture: Minimalism.  Retrieved October 2, 2008, f...
REFERENCES <ul><li>Patsula, P. (1999).  Carroll’s Minimalist Theory.  Retrieved September 27, 2008, from Sookmyung Women’s...
THE END Barbara Debbi Sharon Catherine
THE END Barbara Sharon Debbi Catherine
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Minimalism In A Nutshell

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Brief "how to" use the techniques of minalism for CBI and teaching

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Minimalism In A Nutshell

  1. 1. Lady Lights Present Minimalism EDAE A638: The Facilitation of Learning with Technology
  2. 2. Minimalism in preparing and presenting for learning via Computer/Technology The Bare Necessities
  3. 3. MINIMALIST MODEL <ul><li>“ minimize the extent to which instructional materials obstruct the learning, and focus the design on activities that support learner-directed activity and accomplishments.” </li></ul>http://www.patsula.com/usefo/webbasedlearning/tutorial/learning_theories_full_version.html
  4. 4. L E A R N E R S Use prior knowledge and experience to manage and assimilate new experiences
  5. 5. L E A R N E R S Learn by doing meaningful, self-contained activities Use prior knowledge and experience to manage and assimilate new experiences
  6. 6. L E A R N E R S Learn by doing meaningful, self-contained activities Use prior knowledge and experience to manage and assimilate new experiences Learn by self-directed thinking and reasoning
  7. 7. L E A R N E R S Use errors and recovery to learn Learn by doing meaningful, self-contained activities Use prior knowledge and experience to manage and assimilate new experiences Learn by self-directed thinking and reasoning
  8. 8. L E A R N E R S Use errors and recovery to learn Learn by doing meaningful, self-contained activities Desire realistic learning activities Use prior knowledge and experience to manage and assimilate new experiences Learn by self-directed thinking and reasoning
  9. 9. L E A R N E R S Use errors and recovery to learn Learn by doing meaningful, self-contained activities Desire realistic learning activities Use prior knowledge and experience to manage and assimilate new experiences Learn by self-directed thinking and reasoning Desire close link between activity and reality
  10. 10. DESIGN PRINCIPLES Learner Centered
  11. 11. DESIGN PRINCIPLES Learner Centered Get learner up and running ASAP
  12. 12. DESIGN PRINCIPLES Learner Centered Get learner up and running ASAP Allow learner to think and improvise
  13. 13. DESIGN PRINCIPLES Learner Centered Self-contained and independent Get learner up and running ASAP Allow learner to think and improvise
  14. 14. DESIGN PRINCIPLES Learner Centered Focus on real work in training Self-contained and independent Get learner up and running ASAP Allow learner to think and improvise
  15. 15. DESIGN PRINCIPLES Learner Centered Make use of learner’s prior knowledge Focus on real work in training Self-contained and independent Get learner up and running ASAP Allow learner to think and improvise
  16. 16. DESIGN PRINCIPLES Learner Centered Make use of learner’s prior knowledge Focus on real work in training Self-contained and independent Use error recognition and recovery as learning strategies Get learner up and running ASAP Allow learner to think and improvise
  17. 17. GOAL: facilitate needs of learners Adult learners want to build on prior knowledge without spending additional time with preview, introduction, summary or review material.
  18. 18. GOAL: facilitate needs of learners <ul><li>Remove anything that would hinder learners from moving forward as quickly as possible. </li></ul>Adult learners want to build on prior knowledge without spending additional time with preview, introduction, summary or review material.
  19. 19. DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>1. Important information at top of page (Jones & Farquhar, 1997, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li></ul>
  20. 20. DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>1. Important information at top of page (Jones & Farquhar, 1997, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li></ul><ul><li>2. Simple, consistent web & graphics design (Fahy, 1999, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li></ul>
  21. 21. DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>1. Important information at top of page (Jones & Farquhar, 1997, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li></ul><ul><li>2. Simple, consistent web & graphics design (Fahy, 1999, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li></ul><ul><li>3. Put text first ; use multimedia to reinforce text and not distract from it. (Jones & Farquhar, 1997, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li></ul>
  22. 22. DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>4. Fit a page on one screen to eliminate scrolling (Nielsen, 1996; Jones & Farquhar, 1997, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li></ul>
  23. 23. DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>4. Fit a page on one screen to eliminate scrolling (Nielsen, 1996; Jones & Farquhar, 1997, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li></ul><ul><li>5. Pages balanced, readable, minimal  reduce excess information (Szabo, 1998, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li></ul>
  24. 24. DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>4. Fit a page on one screen to eliminate scrolling (Nielsen, 1996; Jones & Farquhar, 1997, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li></ul><ul><li>5. Pages balanced, readable, minimal  reduce excess information (Szabo, 1998 , cited in Carroll, 1998) </li></ul><ul><li>Broadbent’s theory: “humans are capable of processing information through only one channel at a time . . .” (Hsia, 1968; Szabo 1998, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li></ul>
  25. 25. DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>5. Pages balanced, readable, minimal  reduce excess information (Szabo, 1998, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li></ul><ul><li>Dede says the core skill for today’s workplace is filtering a plethora of incoming information. </li></ul>
  26. 26. DESIGN STRATEGIES <ul><li>5. Pages balanced, readable, minimal  reduce excess information (Szabo, 1998, cited in Carroll, 1998) </li></ul><ul><li>Dede says the core skill for today’s workplace is filtering a plethora of incoming information. </li></ul><ul><li>6. Structure materials as topical modules for ease of reuse. ( Bulter, 1997, cited in Carroll, 1998 ) </li></ul>
  27. 27. WEB-PAGE DESIGN ADVICE <ul><li>Design small </li></ul><ul><li>Keep effects simple </li></ul><ul><li>Map out whole site </li></ul><ul><li>Plan for growth </li></ul>(Rockley, 1997; Fahy, 1999, cited in Carroll, 1998)
  28. 28. WEB-PAGE DESIGN ADVICE <ul><li>Get feedback from users </li></ul><ul><li>Test outside links regularly </li></ul><ul><li>Only one person has edit privileges </li></ul><ul><li>No “ under construction ” sites. Post only when page is complete. </li></ul>(Rockley, 1997; Fahy, 1999, cited in Carroll, 1998)
  29. 29. Albert Einstein <ul><li>&quot;everything should be made as simple as possible, but no simpler.&quot; </li></ul>(Hoch, 2004) Nobel Prize in Physics 1921
  30. 30. Keep It Short and Simple <ul><li>Design simplicity should be a key goal and unnecessary complexity avoided. </li></ul><ul><li>Useful principle in a wide array of disciplines: software development, animation, journalism, photography, engineering, and strategic planning. </li></ul>K I S S http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KISS_principle
  31. 31. C HARACTERISTICS IN EDUCATION <ul><li>Work more with the product and less with the documentation = greater success. (Hofner, 2004, cited at Tec-Ed. 2004) </li></ul>
  32. 32. C HARACTERISTICS IN EDUCATION <ul><li>Learner oriented focus </li></ul><ul><li>Primary requirement: meaningful activity that makes sense for reaching the goal. </li></ul>
  33. 33. C HARACTERISTICS IN EDUCATION <ul><li>Omit long introductions </li></ul><ul><li>Omit repetition and verbiage. </li></ul>
  34. 34. Example: Traditional Instructions <ul><li>THAWING BAGELS </li></ul><ul><li>It’s important to plan baking times carefully so that the bagels do not remain on the racks for moer than four hours after thawing. Bagels that are left on the racks for more than four hours must be discarded. After placing the bagels on the thawing trays, place the trays on every other shelf of the rack and do not close the covers. This will thaw the bagels in 1 ½ to 2 hours. To thaw them in 4 hours, place the trays on every shelf on the rack, then close the covers. To thaw them between 4 and 24 hours, place them on every shelf of the rack, close the covers, and place them in the refrigerator. </li></ul><ul><li>2008 Information Mapping, Inc. </li></ul>
  35. 35. Thawing Bagels 2008 Information Mapping, Inc. Example: Minimalist Instructions If you want to thaw the bagels in . . . Then place the trays . . . 1 ½ to 2 hours <ul><li>On every other shelf of the rack, and </li></ul><ul><li>Do not close the covers </li></ul>4 hours <ul><li>On every shelf of the rack, and </li></ul><ul><li>Close the covers </li></ul>4 to 24 hours <ul><li>On every shelf of the rack </li></ul><ul><li>Close the covers, and </li></ul><ul><li>Put the rack in the refrigerator </li></ul>
  36. 36. Instructions - Traditional Too many pictures and too much clutter. It overwhelms and confuses the reader/user.
  37. 37. Instructions - Traditional Sometimes the layout can be more distracting than helpful, and can take longer to get through.
  38. 38. Instructions - Minimalist <ul><li>Open your Intranet to open YKHC News </li></ul><ul><li>Hover your mouse over Links and Resources – a short list will drop down </li></ul><ul><li>Click on Healthstream (if you accidentally clicked Links and Resources, the link for Healthstream is near the bottom of the page – scroll down and then select Healthstream) </li></ul><ul><li>On the login page </li></ul><ul><ul><li>User ID = your employee ID # (on your badge) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Password = begin </li></ul></ul><ul><li>You will need to reset your password </li></ul><ul><li>You should have 2 courses under “My Courses – Assigned Courses” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rapid Regulatory Compliance: (non-clinical or clinical) I </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rapid Regulatory Compliance: (non-clinical or clinical) II </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Select one of the courses to open course details. </li></ul><ul><li>Select the blue linked course title to open the course in a separate window. </li></ul><ul><li>If you need to exit the course before finishing, use the small grey X in the lower right-hand corner to save your place in the course. </li></ul><ul><li>After completing the course, take the exam. </li></ul><ul><li>You need to complete BOTH courses to complete the Annual Mandatory Orientation (AMOM). </li></ul><ul><li>If you have any problems, call </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sharon John 6984 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Karen McIntyre 6983 </li></ul></ul>
  39. 39. Minimalism in Architecture <ul><li>Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, a Modernist architect, effectively began the Minimalist architectural movement when he said, “Less is more.” </li></ul><ul><li>(Craven, 2008) </li></ul>http://z.about.com/d/architecture/1/0/o/G/luisbarraganhouse-ppl.jpg
  40. 40. Minimalism in Architecture <ul><li>Buildings are stripped of all but the most essential elements </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis is placed on the outline, or frame, of the structure </li></ul><ul><li>Interior walls are eliminated </li></ul><ul><li>Floor plans are open </li></ul><ul><li>Lighting is used to dramatize lines and planes </li></ul><ul><li>The negative spaces around the structure are part of the overall design (Craven, 2008) </li></ul>
  41. 41. REFERENCES <ul><li>Craven, J. (2008). Picture Dictionary of Modern Architecture: Minimalism. Retrieved October 2, 2008, from http://architecture.about.com/od/20thcenturytrends/ig/Modern-Architecture/Minimalism.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Carroll, J. M. (1984). Minimalist Training. Datamation 30 (18), 125-136. </li></ul><ul><li>Carroll, J. M. (1998). Reconstructing Minimalism. In: Carroll, J.M., editor, Minimalism Beyond the Nurnberg Funnel . Cambridge: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Press. </li></ul><ul><li>Hoch, Stephen (2004). Wharton on Making Decisions. New York: Wiley, 137. Retrieved on September 27, 2008, from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KISS_principle </li></ul>
  42. 42. REFERENCES <ul><li>Patsula, P. (1999). Carroll’s Minimalist Theory. Retrieved September 27, 2008, from Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul, Korea, professor’s web page: http://www.patsula.com/usefo/webbasedlearning/tutorial1/learning_theories_full_version.html </li></ul><ul><li>TIP: Theories (2004). Minimalism (J. Carroll). Retrieved September 27, 2008, from website: http://tip.psychology.org/carroll.html </li></ul><ul><li>van der Meij, H. & Carrol, J.M. (1995). Principles and heuristics for designing minimalist instruction. Technical Communications, 42 (2), 243-261. </li></ul>
  43. 43. THE END Barbara Debbi Sharon Catherine
  44. 44. THE END Barbara Sharon Debbi Catherine

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