Recycling of Community Occupational Therapy Equipment

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  • Within community stores, there were large amounts of specialist OT equipment that had been returned to storage when no longer required by the client. It was acknowledged that within the Community Equipment Service that stores staff did not have or could be expected to have the level of knowledge and expertise required to advise OT staff about this equipment when they made enquiries. From February 2010 and OT Technical Instructor was appointed to manage the recycling of specialist equipment. This was to was to ensure the equipment available was used to its full potential.
  • Historically the Community Equipment Service received non-recurring money to provide additional equipment that ensured demands were met and that waiting lists were not created. From 2009 the availability of non-recurring money has been extremely limited and therefore there was a significant drive to ensure all available resources were maximized The amount of returned equipment to both stores was very evident and this equipment because it was not being used was deteriorating rapidly. Staff were encouraged to use the equipment but when they contacted the CES the specialist nature of this equipment meant that stores staff were unable to identify the equipment and therefore advice to OT staff was limited.
  • OT staff also did not have capacity to visit the stores to establish for themselves what equipment was available. The quality of service to clients was also impaired because specialist equipment had to be ordered and due to demand the client was often placed on a waiting list for this equipment and coupled with the length of time the procurement process could take, the client could have waited 6 months or more for this essential equipment, placing them and their carers at risk. OT staff were very frustrated with this poor quality service and CES staff were frustrated with the large volume of equipment sitting taking up space in the store and their frustration at not having someone with the skills and expertise to identify this equipment.
  • Following appointment of OTTI, the OTTI began by visiting the equipment companies for training, to become familiar with the different pieces of equipment and their accessories. This knowledge and skills base became the foundation for the database which was set-up and launched on the intranet by the beginning of March 2010. This involved detailed descriptions and pictures of each piece of equipment, including repairs required to make the equipment functional. As OT staff, CES staff and the OTTI became comfortable and confident in this service, demand increased to include more specialist equipment in the database. Currently the database includes seven areas of specialist equipment and a database specifically for Paediatric OT’s across the Trust. Communication sessions for OT staff to ensure all staff were aware of this new process and would implement appropriately.
  • Following appointment of OTTI, the OTTI began by visiting the equipment companies for training, to become familiar with the different pieces of equipment and their accessories. This knowledge and skills base became the foundation for the database which was set-up and launched on the intranet by the beginning of March 2010. This involved detailed descriptions and pictures of each piece of equipment, including repairs required to make the equipment functional. As OT staff, CES staff and the OTTI became comfortable and confident in this service, demand increased to include more specialist equipment in the database. Currently the database includes seven areas of specialist equipment and a database specifically for Paediatric OT’s across the Trust. Communication sessions for OT staff to ensure all staff were aware of this new process and would implement appropriately.
  • Following appointment of OTTI, the OTTI began by visiting the equipment companies for training, to become familiar with the different pieces of equipment and their accessories. This knowledge and skills base became the foundation for the database which was set-up and launched on the intranet by the beginning of March 2010. This involved detailed descriptions and pictures of each piece of equipment, including repairs required to make the equipment functional. As OT staff, CES staff and the OTTI became comfortable and confident in this service, demand increased to include more specialist equipment in the database. Currently the database includes seven areas of specialist equipment and a database specifically for Paediatric OT’s across the Trust. Communication sessions for OT staff to ensure all staff were aware of this new process and would implement appropriately.
  • Following appointment of OTTI, the OTTI began by visiting the equipment companies for training, to become familiar with the different pieces of equipment and their accessories. This knowledge and skills base became the foundation for the database which was set-up and launched on the intranet by the beginning of March 2010. This involved detailed descriptions and pictures of each piece of equipment, including repairs required to make the equipment functional. As OT staff, CES staff and the OTTI became comfortable and confident in this service, demand increased to include more specialist equipment in the database. Currently the database includes seven areas of specialist equipment and a database specifically for Paediatric OT’s across the Trust. Communication sessions for OT staff to ensure all staff were aware of this new process and would implement appropriately.
  • Control mechanisms set in place regarding requisitions for new equipment – OT checks with OTTI for required equipment, if not available, OT to put in non-stock requisition for new purchase, List of new purchases sent to OTTI to check if equipment has came in to stores since order has been placed, if equipment not available in stores, purchase can go ahead. Assurance can now be provided to the Trust that all new purchases are totally necessary and could not have been provided through recycling. Financial monitoring of the recycling process is ongoing with appropriate records management.
  • OT staff can ring the OTTI and find out instantly whether the required equipment is available in stores. Service users can, consequently, receive equipment the next day rather than waiting until the OT staff have capacity to visit stores themselves A database was kept to record the cost of repair against the cost of buying new equipment.
  • From this database, it was established that the total cost of repairs for specialist seating (if all chairs were to be repaired) was £33,600.00, compared to the cost to buy the chairs new which was £479,670.00. If the OTTI post was not in existence, the specialist seating that was available in stores would not have been properly identified and OT’s would have been more likely to purchase new seating possibly costing the trust a total of £479,670.00. If all chairs that were returned to stores were repaired, it would cost the trust a total of £33,600.00 totaling to a saving of £446,070.
  • The need for the creation of waiting lists reduced as equipment was more readily available and OT staff were able to visualize specialist equipment in stores, establishing what needed repair rather than buying new As OT staff could now contact the OTTI directly to get the relevant information, CES staff were not bombarded with phone calls re specialist equipment.
  • Recycling of Community Occupational Therapy Equipment

    1. 1. Recycling of Community Occupational Therapy Specialist Equipment   Elaine Neill  Occupational Therapy service NHSCT www.COT.org.uk
    2. 2. Project Summary   • Large amount of Specialist Equipment returned  to stores• Lack of knowledge and expertise amongst  store staff• Occupational Therapy Technical Instructor was  appointed to establish recycling service• Project aim was to maximise recycling www.COT.org.uk
    3. 3. Drivers for the Initiative   • From 2009, equipment budgets were reduced,  increasing need to maximise available resources • High ratio of returned equipment to stores, quick  deterioration due to lack of use • Community Equipment Services (CES) staff  were unable to identify specialist equipment  required by OT staff www.COT.org.uk
    4. 4. Drivers for the Initiative   • Lack of capacity of OT staff to visit stores to  identify equipment• Impaired quality of service to clients due to  long procurement process• Frustration from both OT and CES staff due to  poor quality of service and high volume of  equipment www.COT.org.uk
    5. 5. Outcomes   • Occupational Therapy Technical Instructor  appointed and trained in specialist  equipment • Database established and launched on  intranet www.COT.org.uk
    6. 6. Make: Symmetricare KitModel: FingerformDescription: Tilt in space chair – hydraulically operated Recline – hydraulically operated Adjustable head supports – tilt and angle Adjustable head laterals Adjustable side laterals Adjustable height of arm rests Adjustable width of seat Adjustable depth of seat Adjustable height of leg rest Adjustable tilt of foot plateMeasurements: AdjustablePressure care: MediumCovering: MaterialLap Belts: Car typeExtras: Head pillowWeight Limits: 18 stone/115kgRepairs Required: Recline cable has been disconnected for previous clientDate Checked: 16/07/2010Barcode: M032288 www.COT.org.uk
    7. 7. Make: AquatecModel: Ocean VIP XLDescription: Tilt in space shower chair – hydraulically operated Adjustable head rest height and proximity to head 4 brake castorsAperture: Horseshoe: 7” (18cm)Measurements: Width: 19.75” (50cm) Depth: 17.75” (45cm)Lap Belt: StandardWeight Limit: 23 stone/150kgRepairs Required:NoDate Checked: 30/03/2010Barcode: M031850 www.COT.org.uk
    8. 8. Outcomes   • Database has evolved to meet  increasing demand • Communication sessions for OT staff www.COT.org.uk
    9. 9. Outcomes   • Control mechanisms have been established  to prevent unnecessary purchases of  equipment • Financial monitoring of recycling process  established www.COT.org.uk
    10. 10. www.COT.org.uk
    11. 11. Project Benefits   • Development of a more efficient service • Significant reduction in expenditure and  more efficient use of resources www.COT.org.uk
    12. 12. www.COT.org.uk
    13. 13. Project Benefits   • Reduced need for a waiting list for the  issue of equipment • Improved communication between CES  and OT staff www.COT.org.uk
    14. 14. Thank you for Attention www.COT.org.uk

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