CAFS Cura Overview (Williams and Gillis) May 2010 (Final)

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  • I THINK YOUR OWN WORD AND QUOTE BY TIM LANG IN NEXT SLIDE IS A FAR STRONGER OPENING. EXPLAINING THE CONTEXT OF THE QUOTE AND GIVING PEOPLE TIME TO READ IT (OR YOU READING IT) WOULD ADD TO LENGTH. IT MAY NOT GRAB ME BECAUSE I DON’T KNOW WHAT THE INTERVIEWS WERE ABOUT AND ALSO BECAUSE IT BEGINS BY REFERENCE TO THE U.S. ..WHICH I DON’T SEE SETS UP THIS PRESENTATION IN A SESSION ABOUT THREE CANADIAN CURA. BUT JUST MY OPINION!!
  • We are interested in enhancing our understandings of Community Food Security (CFS) in concept and practice while strengthening capacity for policy change at multiple levels including understanding how food systems influence food access, how NS policy environments impact CFS, and the capacities needed to effect policy change to support CFS. In speaking to broad issue of CFS there are tensions inherent to truly developing healthy public food policy – for example competing interests in various sectors - private, public, corporate, nonprofit, local and global – that often lead to incoherent, inconsistent policies that interfere with access to food, especially in vulnerable populations. … Also Lang et al talk about “ In a world marred by obesity alongside malnutrition, climate change alongside fuel and energy crises, water stress alongside more mouths to feed, and social inequalities alongside unprecedented accumulation of wealth, the old rubric of food policy needs re-evaluation. Food policy must be inextricably linked with public health , the environment and social justice to be effective.” CURA’s goal is to uncover and address these tensions – tensions we have been experiencing for some time – and to try to make those links, e.g. between pu blic health , the environment and social justice ,more strongly Ultimately we are interested to learn how can we truly build capacity for change? Situated our project within this braader context.
  • Our CURA team is positioned to contribute strengths, networks & tremendous breadth of skills, knowledge & experience in food security research, education, training, knowledge translation, PAR & policy processes
  • Valuing ways of knowing in partners – e.g. Drawing upon knowledge from academics, community, government Instrumental knowledge is typically thought of as scientific, expert-driven knowledge, whereas interactive knowledge comes from the experience of individuals and communities, and critical knowledge arises from reflective thinking about how social structures and policies impact quality of life and offers alternatives. All three ways of knowing comprise the evidence needed to inform policy decisions, yet typically it is only instrumental knowledge that is sought by decision-makers. PAR actively engages citizens in the generation and integration of all three types of knowledge often bridging class and cultural boundaries to produce more effective social interventions.
  • Visual of partners and what perspectives they bring to the CURA These words reflect the multiple perspectives and varied lens’ that our CURA partners and participants bring to the understanding and taking action on the complex and multifaceted issue of community food security.
  • movement, organic nature, momentum NEED TO UNDERSTAND POLICIES WHICH IMPACT AND SHAPE CFS FROM ALL LEVELS ---- COMMUNITY, PROVINICIAL AND NATIONAL NEED FOR CHANGE AT ALL LEVELS NEED TO LEVERAGE / MOBILIZE ACTION FOR POLICY CHANGE AT ALL LEVELS
  • Have data that affirms our experience - Serious challenges in NS around household food insecurity … In 2004, NS reported Canada’s highest rates of income-related food insecurity (14.6% compared to 9.2% nationally) with a prevalence of over 60% in the lowest income group 12 .
  • In addition we have huge challenges in relation to food supply e.g. In Canada, imports of food as a % of net supply are rising (1964-2002) Fruits (from 67% - 97%), Vegetables (from 20% - 48%), Red Meats (from 4.2% - 24%) - " We suspect that up to 90% of the food Nova Scotians consume may brought into the province primarily by road transport; however, we don’t know the exact amounts." This is from the food miles project....website: http://www.nsfa-fane.ca/programs_and_projects/Food_Miles But we have strong roots in a food rich province - Nova Scotia has a strong agricultural history, with communities that were built around fishing, farming & additional resource-based economies…. It is now estimated that only ~8.4% of the diet in Nova Scotia was produced on Nova Scotian farms Rich in food resources & roots = challenges & growing opportunities e.g. Growth of Farmer’s Markets across Nova Scotia, with an estimated 15 markets in 2004 to 32 currently The food movement has been growing in NS and we have been taking action on these issues Rich in food resources & roots = challenges & growing opportunities - e.g. Growth of Farmer’s Markets across Nova Scotia, with an estimated 15 markets in 2004 to 32 currently - Early work of NSNC to Participatory Food Security Projects - NSFSN - Network of individuals and organizations - eaters, farmers, researchers, nutritionists, civil servants, students, cooks, citizens, gardeners, parents, and more – with interest in working to build food security in Nova Scotia - formed in 2005/06 - grew out of the work of our previous participatory food security projects 10 yr history of working together Food policy work evolving Growth of Farmer’s Markets across Nova Scotia, with an estimated 15 markets in 2004 to 32 currently (Fullerton, David and Sue McNeil, Farmers Markets and their Economic Impact on Nova Scotia: Customer and Vendor Survey Analysis, Farmers’ Markets of Nova Scotia Cooperative Limited, December 2004. )
  • Policy Mapping & Analysis in Case Communities Andree’s theoretical framework Identify policies and policy gaps impacting CFS locally Community level deliberative dialogues (DD) ( Share learning's of PCFA & policy scan, reflect & prioritize policy areas, inform future action planning) Conceptual map of actors, interests, ideas & institutions involved in policies impacting CFS at different levels in NS (Document review, case studies, DD reports, literature, media reports etc…)
  • Focus on key outputs ((CFS policy network., DD, papers, curricula etc) Immediate and intermediate outcomes ((indicators of capacity to influence action & for evidence-based decision making) and on going process evaluations ….. personal interviews with CURA partners; provincial and national leaders, policy makers or academics with specific knowledge of FS policy processes including some AC members; and students and interns b) focus group interview with the Program committee in yrs 2, 4 and 5; and c) media and document review.
  • Students’ focus on CFS CFS Research Interns & Research Assistants (Working Groups) Theses (undergrad & grad) & Postdoctoral Opportunities Curriculum Development (service learning, course based curriculum/new courses) , Online learning projects Research internships Community partners Training workshops on community- based research - ie: photovoice & film-making DD processes CFS Handbook
  • IKT will ensure ongoing knowledge mobilization throughout the 5 yrs and beyond, wherein translation activities are complimentary to PAR. KM will be supported significant in kind support from the National Collaborating Center for Determinants of Health based at St FX, University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), and Participatory Action Research and Training Centre on Food security whose mandates encompass synthesis, knowledge translation and exchange. Existing learning and training tools will be adapted and applied in new contexts e.g. Participatory Food Costing, Thought About Food? Workbook and DVD , new tools on CFS and policy will be developed, and the knowledge generated by the CURA is anticipated to result in increased capacity for CFS related policy change. Critical reflection & deliberative dialogues on CFS & policy – e.g. Deliberative dialogues (DD) in each case community, and at provincial and national/international level, will be a key mechanism for sharing, reflecting upon and interpreting research results, and supporting different ‘ways of knowing’, with a particular emphasis on integrating and translating instrumental and interactive knowledge generated through the Participatory Community Food Assessments for example, with critical knowledge. Interactive learning & multimedia use, e.g. Social media tools, CURA partners will be trained to document project activities through u se of f ilmmaking and Photovoice, etc. Directed communications - Policy briefs, media releases, newsletters Knowledge sharing of CURA - Internal/External communication & articles submitted to Journals, Magazine These concrete outcomes will be significant for improving CFS in NS, in communities across the country, as well as shared internationally.
  • Deliberative Dialogue is a combination of: Deliberation: “ the use of critical thinking & reasoned argument as a way for citizens to make decisions on public policy” Dialogue: “an orientation toward constructive communication, the dispelling of stereotypes, honesty in relaying ideas, & the intention to listen to & understand the other” Creates mutual understanding, builds relationships, solves public problems, addresses policy issues, & connects personal concerns with public concerns - important way of drawing upon different ways of knowing The whole CURA process will be based on principles of DD; started with our proposal development process which resulted in a synthesis paper on DD, Throughout the 5yrs we will be developing processes that will engage people from diverse backgrounds across sectors and strengthen participation in research, KM and training/ed. WE WILL ALSO ENHANCE OUR LEARNING OF DELIBERATIVE DIALOGUE AS A PROCESS AND BUILD OUR CAPACITY AS FACILITATORS OF DD .
  • What is here reflects what came out of July meeting - Model will be evolving and changing Tension: Participatory but various level of accountabilities The challenge is … how far can we move to a truly participatory approach within the constraints of a gov’t funded research project? Relates to 3 rd research question >> we will be testing this! This model is just our thinking at current time but part of what we are doing is contributing to theory on participatory leadership. It is evolving already - Aug meeting will be testing more of a Participatory Leadership Model Traditional approaches may not work best – more inclusive structure needed >> The Art of Hosting as a toolkit for Participatory leadership
  • -Discursive tension in how FS is understood, measured, and approached, in particular, as an issue of food access and food supply and their interdependencies; food security vs. food sovereignty -The disconnect between contemporary food production and distribution systems concentrated within a global economy -The realization that the social phenomenon of local food consumption is increasingly vulnerable to the uncertainty of global forces -Competing approaches to addressing the complexity of food policy that constrain the development of an equitable and coherent approach to building FS for all citizens.
  • Draw upon other ways of knowing – e.g. Aboriginal food security issues Use of new learning & communication tools Collect & consider different ways in policy work Continual reflecting, contributing, learning & sharing NS Food Security Network, other CURA’s, future research, knowledge base & individuals Activating and enacting real change at the community level Inform work of the newly formed NS Food Policy Council Creating success with the Participatory Action Research and Participatory Leadership models
  • CAFS Cura Overview (Williams and Gillis) May 2010 (Final)

    1. 1. Community University Research Alliances (CURAs) that Address Community Food Insecurity and Social Justice across Canada Presented By: Patty Williams (MSVU) & Doris Gillis (St. FX) on behalf of the CURA team Canadian Association of Food Studies, Montreal May 28-30, 2010
    2. 2. For Thought… “ In a world marred by obesity alongside malnutrition, climate change alongside fuel and energy crises, water stress alongside more mouths to feed, and social inequalities alongside unprecedented accumulation of wealth, the old rubric of food policy needs re-evaluation. Food policy must be inextricably linked with public health , the environment and social justice to be effective.” Lang et al. (2009)
    3. 3. Activating Policy Change for Community Food Security??? <ul><li>“ I do a lot of work on the agriculture side with the US in Washington. Two weeks ago I was in Philadelphia at a national conference of state legislators where the issue of food sovereignty (not just food security) came up in spades. Even the US now admits that if there was a pandemic and borders had to close they couldn’t feed themselves. In fact, in Canada, people on the trade side tell me that if we had to close our borders, you wouldn’t believe the shock you would get when you’d look at our grocery store shelves. Within two weeks we would have extreme shortages of food supply - yet we call ourselves the ‘’Breadbasket of the World’!” </li></ul><ul><li>[key informant interview, August 2009] </li></ul>
    4. 4. Central Aim <ul><li>To engage a broad range of stakeholders, including those most vulnerable to food insecurity and organizations that serve them, in a strategic research alliance to better understand the determinants of community food security (CFS), and build capacity for improved food security policy </li></ul>
    5. 5. CURA: Activating Policy Change for Community Food Security <ul><li>Core partners </li></ul><ul><ul><li>NS Food Security Network </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MSVU’s Participatory Action Research & Training Centre on Food Security </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>St. Francis Xavier University </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NS Nutrition Council </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NS Dept. of Health Promotion & Protection </li></ul></ul><ul><li>42 Co-Applicants & Collaborators </li></ul><ul><li>53 Partner Organizations across Canada </li></ul>
    6. 6. Different Ways of Knowing <ul><li>The CURA will use a ‘ways of knowing” typology that values three types of knowledge: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Instrumental </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interactive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Critical </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The CURA will actively involve citizens in the generation and integration of these types of knowledge through Participatory Action Research and Participatory Leadership processes. </li></ul>
    7. 7. (www.wordle.net)
    8. 9. Why Nova Scotia? <ul><li>Income-related household food insecurity by province </li></ul>Health Canada, 2007 - CCHS Cycle 2.2, 2004 (Nutrition)
    9. 10. Why Nova Scotia? <ul><li>In Canada, imports of food as a % of net supply are rising (1964-2002) </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fruits (from 67% - 97%) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Vegetables (from 20% - 48%) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Red Meats (from 4.2% - 24%) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Nova Scotia has a strong agricultural history, with communities that were built around fishing, farming & additional resource-based economies…. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>It is now estimated that only ~8.4% of the diet in Nova Scotia was produced on Nova Scotian farms </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Rich in food resources & roots = challenges & growing opportunities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>e.g. Growth of Farmer’s Markets across Nova Scotia, with an estimated 15 markets in 2004 to 32 currently </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Early work of NSNC to Participatory Food Security Projects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nova Scotia Food Security Network (NSFSN) formed in 2005 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>10 yr history of working together </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Food policy work evolving </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Fullerton & McNeil, 2004; http://www.nsfarmersmarkets.ca/ ; http://www.nsfafane.ca/programs_and_projects/Food_Miles) </li></ul></ul>
    10. 11. <ul><ul><li>What are the components of, & factors contributing to, CFS in NS? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How can we build capacity for policy change at multiple levels to improve CFS? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What & how can a community university participatory research process contribute to the theory & practice of policy change related to food security? </li></ul></ul>Research Questions
    11. 12. Outcomes- Research <ul><li>Participatory Community Food Security Assessments (PCFSA) </li></ul><ul><li>4-6 Case Study communities in NS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify assets & gaps in community food systems (Asset & GIS mapping) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Experiences accessing & navigating community food systems (Photovoice, Structured & Deliberative Dialogues) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Apply & test existing tools against food system characteristics </li></ul></ul>
    12. 13. Outcomes- Research <ul><li>Policy Mapping & Analysis in Case Communities </li></ul><ul><li>Andree’s theoretical framework </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify policies and policy gaps impacting CFS locally </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Community level deliberative dialogues (DD) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conceptual map of actors, interests, ideas & institutions involved in policies impacting CFS at different levels in NS </li></ul></ul>
    13. 14. Outcomes- Research <ul><li>Evaluation and Participatory Methods </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Examine capacity building for policy change </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>at multiple levels using participatory evaluation framework & tools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Focus on: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Key outputs </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Immediate & intermediate outcomes </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ongoing process evaluation </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>METHODS: Personal interviews, focus groups, media & document review </li></ul></ul></ul>
    14. 15. Outcomes- Education & Training <ul><li>Students’ focus on CFS </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CFS Research Interns & Research Assistants (Working Groups) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Theses (undergrad & grad) & Postdoctoral Opportunities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Curriculum Development (service learning, course based curriculum/new courses) , Online learning projects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Research internships </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Community partners </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Training workshops on </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>community- based research </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>DD processes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CFS Handbook </li></ul></ul>
    15. 16. Outcomes- Knowledge Mobilization <ul><li>Integrated knowledge translation </li></ul><ul><li>Application of pre-existing NS developed tools/resources, e.g. Participatory Food Costing, Thought About Food? Workbook and DVD </li></ul><ul><li>Critical reflection & deliberative dialogues </li></ul><ul><li>on CFS & policy </li></ul><ul><li>Interactive learning & multimedia use </li></ul><ul><li>Directed communications </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge sharing of CURA </li></ul>
    16. 17. Deliberative Dialogue <ul><li>Assists in bringing together broad stakeholders to develop common understanding of research purpose/objectives within tight timelines & guidelines </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasizes participatory processes of engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Continued use of DD processes may enhance engagement and critical reflection at local, provincial, & national levels </li></ul><ul><li>Synthesis report </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Williams, P, Gillis, D, Johnson, C, Reimer, D, Vogel, E. (2010). The Use of Deliberative Dialogue Processes in the Nova Scotia Community University Research Alliance: Activating Policy Change for Community Food Security </li></ul></ul>
    17. 18. Participatory Leadership Model Evaluation & Participatory Methods
    18. 19. Challenges…Opportunities <ul><li>Discursive tension in how FS is understood, measured, & approached: ‘food access ’ vs. ‘food supply ’; food </li></ul><ul><li>security vs. food sovereignty </li></ul><ul><li>Disconnect between contemporary food production & distribution systems in a global economy </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing vulnerability of local food consumption to uncertain global forces </li></ul><ul><li>Competing approaches to food policy that prevent development of food security for all citizens </li></ul>
    19. 20. Opportunities <ul><li>Draw upon other ways of knowing </li></ul><ul><li>Use of new learning & communication tools </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Collect & consider different ways in policy work </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Continual reflecting, contributing, learning & sharing </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>NS Food Security Network, other CURA’s, future research, knowledge base & individuals </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Activating and enacting real change at the community level </li></ul><ul><li>Inform work of the newly formed NS Food Policy Council </li></ul><ul><li>Creating success with the Participatory Action Research and Participatory Leadership models </li></ul>
    20. 21. Acknowledgements <ul><li>Sarah Lake, MSVU Grad student and Dietetic Intern </li></ul><ul><li>Stephanie Hughes, Interim CURA Coordinator </li></ul><ul><li>Jeff Harper, Multimedia Project Manager </li></ul><ul><li>Christine Johnson, CURA Co-Director, Susan Roberts, Ellen Vogel, Barbara Anderson for input on presentation </li></ul><ul><li>CURA team </li></ul><ul><li>For more information: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Participatory Action Research and Training Centre on Food Security </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.foodsecurityresearchcentre.ca </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nova Scotia Food Security Network www.nsfoodsecurity.org </li></ul></ul>

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