Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Professional Sentences for
Police Reports: Part I
by Jean Reynolds, Ph.D.
Sentences are the basic
building materials for
police writing.
Writing error-free
sentences makes
you look
professional.
Professional
sentence patterns
are especially
important as you
climb the career
ladder in law
enforcement.
Today we’re
going to look at
two useful types
of professional
sentences.
Let’s look at the
first type of
sentence.
Can you see a problem with the
sentence below?
It sounds like “John Henry” is one
person. Confusing!
You probably had to read the sentence
twice before it made sense.
A comma solves the problem:
Here’s a handy rule:
Use a comma when a
sentence starts with an
extra idea.
“While I was
interviewing John” is
an extra id...
A sentence ends with a period.
An extra idea ends with a comma…and
then it keeps going.
You can spot an “extra idea” (which
needs a comma) by looking at the first
word.
If it’s not a person, place, or thing, it...
“Look at the first
word” is a great trick
that you’ll use often.
Let’s try another one.
Confusing, isn’t it?
(Was it really raining outside Smith’s
shoes?)
Now the sentence is easy to understand
the first time you read it!
A comma saves the day.
“Although it was raining outside” is an
extra idea that needs a comma.
(You knew a comma was needed when you
looked at the...
Let’s go on to our
second
professional
sentence pattern.
Sally is not a very nice person…or did
we miss something here?
Sounds better, doesn’t it?
Is there a way to fix this sentence to
eliminate the confusion?
Yes! Once again,
the answer is a
comma.
Put a comma at
the end of the
first sentence:
Now the sentence makes sense the first
time you read it!
Good writers think
about that comma
every time they join
sentences with and.
(Incidentally, but
works the same way.)
Let’s look at another example. Here
are two incomplete sentences. Can you
see a difference in between them?
Without the comma, your partner
probably suffered an injury:
Insert the comma, and your partner is
probably okay:
Here’s an example with but. Here are
two incomplete sentences. Do you see
a difference between them?
Now you can see that the comma
makes a difference!
Here’s your second
handy rule: Use a
comma when you
join two sentences
with and or but.
You can learn more about professional
sentence patterns at
www.YourPoliceWrite.com.
Everything there is free, and no
registration is needed:
www.YourPoliceWrite.com.
And if you’re
looking for a
low-cost,
practical book
that covers
sentence
patterns,
English usage,
and police
reports…
Criminal Justice
Report Writing is
available from
www.Amazon.com for
just $19.95.
View a free sample
online.
A discount price is
available for class sets
(minimum five books).
Send your request to
jreynoldswrite @
aol.com
An e-book edition is
available from
www.Smashwords.com
for only $9.99.
A free Instructor’s
Manual is available on
request: Send an e-
mail to jreynoldswrite
at aol.com.
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Professional Sentence Patterns for Police Reports Part I

2,777 views

Published on

Effective sentences are the building blocks for successful police reports - and they're essential tools as you climb the career ladder in law enforcement. This PowerPoint shows you how to write (and punctuate) two essential sentence patterns.

Published in: Career

Professional Sentence Patterns for Police Reports Part I

  1. 1. Professional Sentences for Police Reports: Part I by Jean Reynolds, Ph.D.
  2. 2. Sentences are the basic building materials for police writing.
  3. 3. Writing error-free sentences makes you look professional.
  4. 4. Professional sentence patterns are especially important as you climb the career ladder in law enforcement.
  5. 5. Today we’re going to look at two useful types of professional sentences.
  6. 6. Let’s look at the first type of sentence.
  7. 7. Can you see a problem with the sentence below?
  8. 8. It sounds like “John Henry” is one person. Confusing!
  9. 9. You probably had to read the sentence twice before it made sense.
  10. 10. A comma solves the problem:
  11. 11. Here’s a handy rule: Use a comma when a sentence starts with an extra idea. “While I was interviewing John” is an extra idea.
  12. 12. A sentence ends with a period. An extra idea ends with a comma…and then it keeps going.
  13. 13. You can spot an “extra idea” (which needs a comma) by looking at the first word. If it’s not a person, place, or thing, it’s an “extra idea.”
  14. 14. “Look at the first word” is a great trick that you’ll use often. Let’s try another one.
  15. 15. Confusing, isn’t it? (Was it really raining outside Smith’s shoes?)
  16. 16. Now the sentence is easy to understand the first time you read it! A comma saves the day.
  17. 17. “Although it was raining outside” is an extra idea that needs a comma. (You knew a comma was needed when you looked at the first word: Although.)
  18. 18. Let’s go on to our second professional sentence pattern.
  19. 19. Sally is not a very nice person…or did we miss something here?
  20. 20. Sounds better, doesn’t it?
  21. 21. Is there a way to fix this sentence to eliminate the confusion?
  22. 22. Yes! Once again, the answer is a comma. Put a comma at the end of the first sentence:
  23. 23. Now the sentence makes sense the first time you read it!
  24. 24. Good writers think about that comma every time they join sentences with and. (Incidentally, but works the same way.)
  25. 25. Let’s look at another example. Here are two incomplete sentences. Can you see a difference in between them?
  26. 26. Without the comma, your partner probably suffered an injury:
  27. 27. Insert the comma, and your partner is probably okay:
  28. 28. Here’s an example with but. Here are two incomplete sentences. Do you see a difference between them?
  29. 29. Now you can see that the comma makes a difference!
  30. 30. Here’s your second handy rule: Use a comma when you join two sentences with and or but.
  31. 31. You can learn more about professional sentence patterns at www.YourPoliceWrite.com.
  32. 32. Everything there is free, and no registration is needed: www.YourPoliceWrite.com.
  33. 33. And if you’re looking for a low-cost, practical book that covers sentence patterns, English usage, and police reports…
  34. 34. Criminal Justice Report Writing is available from www.Amazon.com for just $19.95. View a free sample online.
  35. 35. A discount price is available for class sets (minimum five books). Send your request to jreynoldswrite @ aol.com
  36. 36. An e-book edition is available from www.Smashwords.com for only $9.99.
  37. 37. A free Instructor’s Manual is available on request: Send an e- mail to jreynoldswrite at aol.com.

×