Guide to instituting student partnerships v0 8

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Guide to instituting student partnerships v0 8

  1. 1. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships This document is based on a review of current and past innovation, change and quality initiatives that have involved curriculum/student experience innovation/development (which may involve technology) together with student partnerships & engagement. It concludes that there are four key dimensions for instituting student partnerships: (1) Partnership set-up; (2) Partnership implementation; (3) Capabilities, development and accreditation and (4) Evaluation, impact & sustainability. A set of practice points has been developed for each of the four dimensions. For each practice point, “Top Tips” are given (based on reports and evidence from the initiatives and research) together with guides to sector resources that are available. This guide has been initiated and funded by Jisc. Reference: Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships V0-9.docx Version: 0-8 Date: 5 march 2014 Author: Peter Chatterton
  2. 2. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships Contents 1. Rationale for working in partnerships with students .............................................................................................................................................................. 3 2. Practice points for instituting student partnerships ................................................................................................................................................................ 4 3. Top Tips and guides to sector resources for each practice point ............................................................................................................................................ 5 3.1 Partnership set-up ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 3.2 Partnership implementation .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 17 3.3 Capabilities, development and accreditation ................................................................................................................................................................ 31 3.4 Evaluation, impact and sustainability ............................................................................................................................................................................ 38 4. Innovation, change and quality initiatives in student partnerships ...................................................................................................................................... 48 5. Case studies of student partnership/engagement ................................................................................................................................................................ 60 6. Useful resources..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 68 Quotes; why is student engagement important? “Students as partners is not just a nice-to-have, I believe it has the potential to help bring about social and educational transformation, as long as we know what we are trying to do and we maintain a critical attitude about the ways the concept is adopted and used.” Rachel Wenstone, Vice President (Higher Education), NUS – A Manifesto for Partnership (November 2012) ‘Student engagement and learning is more effective, gratifying, and personally meaningful when all stakeholders (eg. instructors, students, course designers) are collaboratively involved in co-creating and developing a community of practice around a course’. These principles imply that students are not viewed simply as knowledge consumers who are passive recipients of information that is fed to them through lecture and textbooks but rather they are active co-creators of knowledge – apprentice researchers, authors, teachers, scholars and practitioners – who are learning to take full ownership of their own learning processes. "Increasing Student Engagement and Retention using online learning activities" Emerald Group: Bingley. “…productive engagement is an important means by which students develop feelings about their peers, professors and institutions that give them a sense of connectedness, affiliation, and belonging, while simultaneously offering rich opportunities for learning and development.” Bensimon, E .M . (2009) Foreword . In: Harper, S .R . and Quaye, S .J . (eds .) Student Engagement in Higher Education . New York and London: Routledge, pp . xxi-xxvi . Page 2
  3. 3. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 1. Rationale for working in partnerships with students A number of institutions have pioneered projects to work in partnership with students to advance educational innovation, many sponsored by Jisc and the Higher Education Academy (HEA). Though it could be regarded as early days for such partnerships, there are clear benefits emerging: Students         Gain an experience of leadership. Gain experience in influencing change. Gain experience of using research to shape change. Students can gain recognition through awards such as leadership awards, extra-curricular awards and awards accredited through external bodies. Enhances student experience. Increases confidence & skills (e.g. communication, team-working, management, research skills). Enhances networking with e.g. employers, community. Improved employability and job prospects. Staff     Closer working/learning engagement with students. Learning from students – and an important dimension to their CPD. Raising of individual profiles in their institutions and in the sector. Enhanced input into research and papers via student engagement. Institutions      Opportunity for students to gain skills to support employability, and greater involvement in the learning and teaching experience. Aids retention. Develops enhanced working/learning/assessment engagement between students and tutors. Engages students with research-led change. Students inspire academics in technology-led educational innovation.     Employers can benefit from students experienced in leading research led change. Stimulates students to engage with employers and communities. Students more likely to become leaders in their professions & communities. High levels of volunteering by Alumni. Employers & communities Page 3
  4. 4. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 2. Practice points for instituting student partnerships A review of current and past initiatives involving development of student partnerships focused on educational innovation, change and digital media concludes that there are four key dimensions for instituting such partnerships as follows:     Partnership set-up Partnership implementation Capabilities, development and accreditation Evaluation, impact & sustainability Within each dimension of instituting student partnerships, the following practice points have been identified as being key for success (note: dimensions are not necessarily sequential): 1 Partnership set-up 2 Partnership implementation 3 Capabilities, development and accreditation 4 Evaluation, impact & sustainability 1.1. Carry out a baseline study to research current position. 1.2. Establish the case for student partnerships and align with strategies and policies. 1.3. Establish motivation, reward and recognition options for students and staff 1.4. Devise novel recruitment and induction approaches for students. 1.5. Identify a partnership model that encompasses options for different student roles together with a range of stakeholders. 1.6. Identify an outline project plan including resources and funding 1.7. Identify and learn from exemplars and case studies of student partnerships 2.1. Establish, implement and monitor a project plan (based on agile methodology) 2.2. Develop a set of principles of good practice to follow for student partnerships 2.3. Allocate significant time and resource for stakeholder engagement and communications 2.4. Develop/acquire guides, toolkits and resources 2.5. Clarify detailed student and staff roles, responsibilities and activities. 2.6. Identify risks and how to manage them 2.7. Establish/join external and internal communities of practice 3.1. Define core student capabilities, attributes and development frameworks for student innovation and change activities. 3.2. Develop/acquire courses and training/learning resources for students and staff 3.3. Implement student personal & professional development planning using reflective practice and eportfolios 3.4. Develop academic and professional body recognition and accreditation opportunities for students 3.5. Provide student/staff support 3.6. Provide relevant staff training and link to CPD 4.1. Identify the rationale and need for evaluation. 4.2. Choose appropriate qualitative and quantitative evaluation approaches 4.3. Adopt a range of data collection techniques to support evaluation. 4.4. Identify impact on a range of stakeholders and the institution 4.5. Develop case studies for use with stakeholder communications and engagement. 4.6. Develop recommendations for sustaining student partnerships as part of evaluation 4.7. Explore options for institutionally embedding student partnerships. Page 4
  5. 5. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 3. Top Tips and guides to sector resources for each practice point For each of the practice points (in each of the four dimensions), guides and “top tips” are provided below: 3.1 Partnership set-up 1 Partnership set-up Practice point 1.1 Carry out a baseline study to research current position. Questions  To what extent are there already student engagement initiatives across the institution?  To what extent are students and staff “ready and motivated” to work & learn in partnership?  To what extent are institutional practices, policies and processes “ready” for student partnerships? Top tips      Areas to research include: o policy and strategy o institutional processes and systems o infrastructure o support services o LT&A practice, expertise o staff CPD (inc. digital literacy) o MIS and infrastructure o communications, stakeholder needs, views and expectations o other institutional initiatives. o student employability skills, graduate attributes and digital literacy Use base-lining to inform planning at project and institutional levels. Develop a set of impact indicators/measures of success to allow change and impact to be evaluated and measured. Use both qualitative and quantitative approaches. Use research/evaluation data from Guide to sector resources The Jisc Design Studio contains the following resources relating to baselining and which have been developed as an output of a number of e-learning programmes e.g. Developing Digital Literacies, Assessment and Feedback programme and Jisc Curriculum Design and Delivery programmes. Many of the links include example baseline reports as well as useful baselining tools and resources:  Baselining digital literacy The page collates resources for conducting a baseline review of digital literacy at an institutional level, as carried out by the 12 institutional projects and 10 professional associations of the Jisc Developing Digital Literacies (DDL) programme – see also examples of DL baseline reports.  DL baseline framework for projects This page outlines areas in which projects conducted baselining in the Developing Digital Literacies programme.  Baselining approaches and findings on the Assessment and Feedback programme Projects in Strand A of the Assessment and Feedback programme drew on qualitative and quantitative evidence from a range of stakeholders and information sources to provide a baseline review of assessment and feedback practice in their institutions – this page presents approaches and findings.  Tools and resources for DL baselining A list of tools and resources for baselining that were used on the Developing Digital Literacies programme. Page 5
  6. 6. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 1 Partnership set-up Practice point Top tips  1.2 Establish the case for student partnerships and align with strategies and policies.  Questions  Is there a clearly identified rationale and case for student partnerships?  Which institutional policies and initiatives will student partnerships benefit?  Will student partnerships support employability skills and graduate attributes?       Guide to sector resources a range of sources e.g. student surveys, data from research projects. As well as established research techniques (e.g. focus groups, surveys), use multimedia/technology-based approaches e.g. process maps, rich pictures, video interviews, social media. Identify drivers and needs for students, staff, the institution and others stakeholders such as employers. Identify potential benefits and impact for students, staff, employers and the institution. Map the potential benefits and impact to institutional strategies & policies (e.g. relating to student experience, employability) Don’t be afraid to “think big”, though ensure there is buy-in to a clear vision. Engage stakeholders from across the institution in establishing the case for student partnerships. Engage employers and professional/sector bodies in establishing the case for student partnerships. Where possible, try to keep The HEA commissioned a review of research on student engagement by Professor Paul Trowler and Vicki Trowler and this led to the development of:  an evidence summary (PDF, 784KB)  an international literature review (PDF, 472KB)  a Framework for Action for institutional decision-makers (PDF, 196KB)  a set of case studies (PDF, 1240KB) The value of student engagement as an important factor in educational gain was also highlighted by an HEA publication authored by Graham Gibbs, Dimensions of Quality. Key conclusions from the evidence summary::   Regarding student engagement in individual student learning: o student engagement improves outcomes; o specific features of engagement improve outcomes; o engagement improves specific desirable outcomes; o the value of engagement is no longer questioned; o responsibility for engagement is shared . Regarding student engagement with structure and process: o student engagement in university governance benefits student representatives; Page 6
  7. 7. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 1 Partnership set-up Practice point Top tips   partnership voluntary and focus on recognition and rewards (e.g. enhanced employability and potential accreditation). Establish cross-institutional approaches to working collaboratively. Ensure issues and opportunities identified in base-lining are considered. Guide to sector resources o o  student representation on committees in the UK is generally felt to be effective; high-performing institutions share several ‘best practice’ features regarding student engagement in governance; o high-performing institutions share several ‘best practice’ features regarding student leadership; o the most commonly reported form of ‘engagement’ of students in the UK is through feedback questionnaires . Regarding student engagement with identity: o prior characteristics do not determine whether students will engage; o engagement benefits all students – but some more than others; o engagement requires successful transition; o some students experience engagement negatively It was also stressed “Virtually every report ….emphasized to varying degrees the important link between student engagement and desired outcomes of college” Since the HEA research, there have been a number of innovation, change and quality enhancement initiatives in institutions across the UK that have further developed the concepts of student engagement and partnerships whereby there is much greater emphasis on student action and with the student as driver for innovation and change (these are listed in the section “Innovation, change and quality initiatives in student partnerships”. Quote; why is student engagement important? ‘Student engagement and learning is more effective, gratifying, and personally meaningful when all stakeholders (eg. instructors, students, course designers) are collaboratively involved in co-creating and developing a community of practice around a course’. These principles imply that students are not viewed simply as knowledge consumers who are passive recipients of information that is fed to them through lecture and textbooks but rather they are active co-creators of knowledge – apprentice researchers, authors, teachers, scholars and practitioners – who are learning to take full ownership of their own learning processes. "Increasing Student Engagement and Retention using online learning activities" Emerald Group: Bingley. 1.3 Establish motivation,  Identify incentives for students, The Jisc Design Studio contains useful guidance in relation to motivation, reward and recognition for Page 7
  8. 8. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 1 Partnership set-up Practice point Top tips reward and recognition options for students and staff Questions  To what extent have the pros and cons of different ways of motivating and rewarding students and staff been considered?  To what extent should recognition for student partnership work support students in gaining employment and in developing their employability skills?  To what extent should a student partnership initiative align with the work of other institutional departments which focus on e.g. employability, careers.    such as: o remuneration o improving job prospects o developing personal, academic and professional skills o working with employers o academic & professional accreditation and recognition. Consider the pros and cons of alternative ways of engaging students e.g.: o Paid interns o Casual employees of the institution o Unpaid volunteers o Participants on an accredited module of study. o Participants on a co-curricular programme which contributes to e.g. a graduate award, eportfolio or HEAR record of achievement. o Participants engaged in research projects as part of scholarly culture. Work with partners to establish recognition pathways for students e.g. professional institutions, HE/FE sector bodies and aim to build on established accreditation frameworks. Work with institutional employability and careers Guide to sector resources students and staff e.g.  Student digital pioneers Summary of issue within the Developing Digital Literacies programme. The Oxford Brookes ePioneer approach offers students recognition pathways with partners such as the Institute of Leadership and Management (ILM), Association of Learning Technologists (ALT) and Evaluation of Learner Experiences of E-learning Special Interest Group (ELESIG).  The Graduate Recruitment Intelligence project The Graduate Recruitment Intelligence project has developed e-transcripts which allow graduates to showcase academic and other achievement data held in university corporate systems in ways that are attractive and meaningful to employers. The GRI project also relates to, and supports the implementation of, the Higher Education Achievement Report (HEAR). Page 8
  9. 9. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 1 Partnership set-up Practice point Top tips   1.4 Devise novel recruitment and induction approaches for students (1) Questions  Have the skills and attributes for students been defined?  Are traditional recruitment processes suitable for identifying students with the appropriate skills and attributes?  To what extent have suitable guidance and induction resources been developed to help students decide whether they want to engage in partnership work?    Guide to sector resources departments to join-up approaches and initiatives. Ensure there is mutual benefit for both staff and students. Provide multiple opportunities to allow students to showcase their achievements, including with external audiences such as employers and professional bodies. Define the skills and attributes of students that are wanted e.g. o a diverse skill set o a high degree of intrinsic motivation o the ability to work autonomously and communicate with a broad range of stakeholders o ability to work as a dynamic member of a research team and across disciplines and academic years. Set-up and facilitate an online social media forum to support student recruitment and networking. Design recruitment processes to allow students to demonstrate their strengths, attributes and abilities e.g. o effective working in diverse groups o motivation to work on a project o ability to research and present The University of Greenwich has developed a novel student recruitment process as part of their Digital Literacies in Transition project where an Interdisciplinary Research Group (IRG) was at the heart of the project, involving students from a range of campuses, academic years and disciplines. Oxford Brookes ePioneer Recruitment and briefing pack. Page 9
  10. 10. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 1 Partnership set-up Practice point Top tips  1.4 Devise novel recruitment and induction approaches for students (2) Questions  Have the skills and attributes for students been defined?  Are traditional recruitment processes suitable for identifying students with the appropriate skills and attributes?  To what extent have suitable guidance and induction resources been developed to help students decide whether they want to engage in partnership work?    Guide to sector resources new ideas in a clear way using a variety of digital tools o ability to show initiative, creativity and working in a range of situations. Develop contract and compliance documents covering e.g. data protection, H&S, privacy, ethics, copyright, IPR etc. Develop clear briefing guides and resources to explicitly describe the why, what, how, when, where, who of the project covering e.g. o needs and benefits o remuneration o activities o roles and boundaries o what can be expected from others such as staff o reward and recognition o making use of digital tools. Develop and run briefing sessions for students, building on the briefing guides and resources. Instead of traditional recruitment techniques consider techniques such as o asking students to prepare some of artefact for a defined purpose (e.g. a video, web-resource) o participate in workshops where they have to engage with teams Page 10
  11. 11. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 1 Partnership set-up Practice point Top tips  1.5 Identify a partnership model that encompasses options for different student roles together with a range of stakeholders. (1) Questions:  Have a range of different student roles been considered?  Have a broad range of opportunities for student partnerships been identified?  To what extent will student partnerships align with employability agendas and initiatives?      Guide to sector resources to carry out a range of activities (using digital tools). Consider branding student-led initiatives (e.g. the University of Greenwich Interdisciplinary Research Group - IRG). Identify at what level to set-up partnerships e.g. institutional, faculty, disciplinary, crossdisciplinary. Identify who should be involved e.g o academics o professional support staff o students o alumni o prospective students o employers, o local community o employer/ sector/ professional bodies o external experts o mentors and assessors Review the various models of student partnerships that different institutions have adopted and develop an appropriate model for the institutional and/or local contexts – which may be phased. Integrate with employability agendas and activities. Develop an academic lead/champion at each local level. There are a number of models for student partnerships e.g. the University of Exeter Integrate project framework with four key student roles (representing differences in how active/leading students are):  Student as evaluator of their HE experience (the student voice) Students offer feedback, views and opinions and are listened to on an institutional basis, in order to build an evidence-base as a basis for enhancement and change. Decisions for action tend to be taken at subject and/or institutional level.  Students as participants in decision-making processes Students engage in institutional decision-making, in order to influence enhancement and change. Decisions tend to be taken collaboratively with staff and students but do not involve students in action.  Students as partners, co-creators and experts Students are collaborative partners in curriculum provision and professional development, in order to enhance staff and student learning. Decisions for action tend to be taken at subject and/or institutional level.  Students as agents for change Students are collaborative partners in pedagogic knowledge acquisition and professional development, with the purpose of bringing about change. Decisions for action tend to be promoted by students and engaged with at subject and/or institutional level. Another model is from the Oxford Brookes InStePP project, where they have developed student partnerships that revolve around one or more roles depending upon the setting: Page 11
  12. 12. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 1 Partnership set-up Practice point Top tips Guide to sector resources  Student as researcher Students act as partners in research e.g. • Pedagogic knowledge development • Institutional research in e.g. digital literacy, TEL including students setting their own agendas • Evaluating institutional change e.g. in level and development of digital literacy, TEL • Evaluating use of technology by other students in peer-assisted learning role • Creating and managing digital outputs for undergraduate research conferences  Student as resource creator Students create usable and accessible resources e.g. • Resources and guides for curricula or commercial purposes • Scoping user requirements and develop resources • Developing employability resources  Student as mentor Students act in the role of mentor e.g. • Providing support for staff and other students on a range of digital literacies, tools and TEL  Student as entrepreneur * /change agent Students act in the role of entrepreneur / change agent e.g. • Providing expertise on special projects arising from within the University community • Providing consultancy/change agent services to the University, employers and other stakeholders • Supporting curriculum innovation and quality enhancement  Student as trainer Students act in the role of mentor e.g. • Reverse tutoring (to train staff on setting up courses in VLE and other digital environments, tools etc.) • Peer assisted learning among students *Note: Oxford Brookes instep project concluded that “the entrepreneur role be withdrawn as Page 12
  13. 13. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 1 Partnership set-up Practice point Top tips Guide to sector resources inappropriate for a voluntary scheme whose incentives and rewards are intended to be academic and employability-related.” Student as Change agents: New Ways of engaging with learning and teaching in higher education Elisabeth Dunne and Roos Zandstra, University of Exeter http://dera.ioe.ac.uk/14767/1/8242.pdf The University of Exeter has developed an innovative and exciting student-led action research initiative that brings students and staff together to improve experiences of higher education. Students from across the university have contributed to this initiative, carrying out a series of research projects on their learning and teaching environment, selecting concerns raised through student-staff liaison committees (SSLCs), and providing recommendations and solutions to improve their experience. A small amount of funding was made available from the University’s learning and teaching budget to support this initiative. A FRAMEWORK FOR PROMOTING CHANGE IN TECHNOLOGY USE THROUGH ENGAGING STUDENTS The framework is designed around two key dimensions:  The extent to which any activity is led by students, or led by the institution  The extent to which any activity is premised on active engagement by students in change, or is based on more passive forms of representation  The framework may allow a better understanding of formal engagement with students, the different forms that this can take, and where responsibilities lie. The University of Greenwich employed cross-university studentships to foster a community of student-led research as part of their Digital Literacies in Transition project (part of the Developing Digital Literacies programme). Termed the IRG (Interdisciplinary Research Group), this group of students, their mentors and members of staff from all aspects of the institution will engage in baselining activities as well as develop OERs that link attribute development to DL skills and opportunities. The University of Winchester and Bath Spa University created the concept of Student Fellows to act as Change Agents in their FASTECH project focused on enhancing Assessment and feedback though the use of technology. Student Fellow responsibilities were to work with the FASTECH team, lecturers Page 13
  14. 14. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 1 Partnership set-up Practice point Top tips Guide to sector resources and students to develop technology for specific assessment problems, and to evaluate its use. Student fellows are co-constructors of the research and development on FASTECH, acting as insiders and change agents, developing an understanding of assessment principles, familiarity with technology, and research skills. See the Briefing paper on the Student Fellow scheme for further info. 1.5 Identify a partnership model that encompasses options for different student roles together with a range of stakeholders. (2)  Questions:  Have a range of different student roles been considered?  Have a broad range of opportunities for student partnerships been identified?  To what extent will student partnerships align with employability agendas and initiatives?  Identify a broad range of opportunities for student partnerships in educational innovation and change to focus on e.g. o curriculum design & delivery. o assessment and feedback. o digital literacies. o library and information services. o student experience, support and guidance. o digital resources. o staff development. o learning resources. o student records, administration, management and information systems. o institutional processes e.g. QA, induction. o institutional polices. Based on the defined partnership model, develop options for different student roles e.g. o student as researcher o student as resource creator o student as expert o student as mentor o student as change agent student Page 14
  15. 15. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 1 Partnership set-up Practice point Top tips Guide to sector resources as trainer (staff and peer trainer) o student as evaluator o student advisor. 1.6 Identify an outline project plan including resources and funding   Questions  To what extent has the development of a project plan been a collaborative exercise?  Have measures/indicators of impact been identified?  Are there appropriate governance measures in place?      Develop an outline project plan for setting up and implementing student partnerships. Use the practice points from this guide as a check-list for the project plan. Adopt an agile and flexible approach to project planning – in order to allow the project to adapt to problems, emerging opportunities and changing contexts. Ensure that the project plan has clear overall aims and objectives as well as defining outputs and outcomes – particularly potential impact on institutions, sector and individuals. Aim to develop indicators of impact, though this might need to wait post-baselining. Ensure representatives of all key stakeholder groups help to develop the plan. Place considerable focus on stakeholder communications and engagement – both formal and informal - and using social media to   Jisc InfoNet guide to project management. JISC RSC Wales: Social media for student engagement Page 15
  16. 16. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 1 Partnership set-up Practice point Top tips  1.7 Identify and learn from exemplars and case studies of student partnerships   To what extent have experiences and lessons learnt from other student partnership initiatives been researched and contextualised? To what extent have these experiences and lessons learnt been shared with all stakeholders?      Guide to sector resources underpin this. Develop appropriate governance structures including the formation of a steering group that represents a broad cross-section of roles and interests (including external representatives). There has been a considerable number of student partnership and engagement projects undertaken by institutions and much can be learnt from their experiences, therefore it is worthwhile taking the time to learn from these to supplement this guide. Identify likely issues and challenges and how other institutions and projects have addressed and managed them. Look for partnerships in your own institution – these are not always actively promoted. Use the lessons learnt to inform the development of your “principles of good practice” in student partnerships. Ensure you share the lessons learnt from the exemplars/case studies with all those involved with setting up and implementing student partnerships – and facilitate dialogue on how such lessons can Examples of student engagement/partnership projects:  “Student Engagement: Identify, motivation and community” – book by Claus Nygaard, Stuart Brand, Paul Bartholomew, Luke Millard, Libri Publishing ISBN 978 1 907471 65 0  Oxford Brookes InStePP project - Student partnerships offer a way to join up provision for digital literacies for staff and students across the institution by establishing, supporting and building recognition for the role of student ‘ePioneers’ within existing core academic and elearning development activities.  Greenwich Digital Literacies in Transition project - cross-university studentships foster a community of student-led research to support and feed into all other aspects of the project. Termed the IRG (Interdisciplinary Research Group), this group of students, their mentors and members of staff from all aspects of the institution will engage in baselining activities as well as develop OERs that link attribute development to DL skills and opportunities.  Reading Digitally Ready project has worked with students as partners in digital projects with academics, students as researchers, students feeding in their stories to inform work on the project and students undertaking work directly for the project.  Student Fellows at Bath Spa and Winchester: The FASTECH project is focused on enhancing feedback and assessment processes through the use of technology. The project has recruited Student Fellows to participate in research activities, generate ideas, develop case studies, write blogs and attend and present at conferences. They are the interface between the project team and students and lecturers. Further guidance on the student fellows scheme is available here  University of Exeter - Students as Change Agents: Students have been given opportunities to work in partnership with university staff in order to address the challenges of using technology Page 16
  17. 17. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 1 Partnership set-up Practice point Top tips  Guide to sector resources be adapted to you own needs and contexts. Maintain a shared online resource of links to exemplars and case studies. with large and diverse cohorts. They have undertaken research on student views and perceptions, provided recommendations and solutions for practice, and have supported staff in bringing about wide-scale changes in teaching. Much of this work evolved through the Integrate project . Resources are available on the project website. The work continues through projects such as the CascadeDigital Literacies project which involves postgraduate researchers. Podcast : Students as Agents of Change at Exeter  Birmingham City University – Student Academic Partners: The T-SPARC project engaged with students through the University’s Student Academic Partners (SAP) programme as part of a review of curriculum design practices and processes. SAP aims to integrate students into the teaching and pedagogic research community within BCU in order to develop collaboration between students and staff. The T-SPARC project also produced a wider stakeholder engagement model which could be used when considering the development of student engagement activities. This video collates student voices to influence curriculum design (format - wmv, mp4) What works? Student Retention and Success (HEA, HEFCE, Paul Hamlyn Foundation, Action on Access) Building student engagement and belonging in Higher Education at a time of change: a summary of findings and recommendations from the What Works? Student Retention & Success programme. 3.2 Partnership implementation 2 Partnership implementation Practice point 2.1 Establish, implement and monitor a project plan (based on agile methodology) Top tips Develop a project plan and ensure that project participants buy-in to their roles and responsibilities. Guide to sector resources HEA Students as Partners Change Programme Resources A useful collection of resources from the programme e.g. for dealing with change, embedding and sustaining. Page 17
  18. 18. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 2 Partnership implementation Practice point Questions  To what extent is your project working in an uncertain environment?  What issues and challenges are your projects likely to encounter?  To what extent do the project team members work well together? Top tips In early stages of student partnerships adopt light-touch management approaches – though this might need to change as such partnerships evolve. Adopt an agile and flexible approach that allows for responding to changing issues, contexts and policies. Where appropriate, work with other institutional departments/support services/initiatives to identify areas of mutual benefit e.g. helping them to meet their own goals. Engage the student union as a key partner. Ensure there is sufficient initiative funding particularly seed-funding. Encourage cross-faculty/department working to minimise “silos”. Adopt and encourage business-like and entrepreneurial approaches. Always be aware of the need to build capacity in both the student body and with staff. Encourage best-practice team-working through e.g. developing team skills and appropriate team-building exercises. Review the partnership on a regular basis. Guide to sector resources http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/resources/detail/change/SAP_resource_page#Startup HEA: Student as Partners: The challenge of student engagement Professor Stuart Brand, Director of Learning Experience; Luke Millard, Head of Learning Partnerships http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/assets/documents/change/SAP/TL1_SBLM_BCU_SAP.ppt Based on the HEA’s experience, effective change initiatives are characterised by:  A shared vision  A sound evidence base  A strategic approach  Senior management buy-in  Strategies for managing resistance  Student engagement  An evaluation strategy  Flexibility and agility  Good project management  Effective team working Useful tips about managing student partnership projects can be found in the following:  Oxford Brookes Jisc-funded InStePP project (e-Pioneers) final report and evaluation.  Student perspective: Newcastle University: The Creation of an Independent Study Module  Student perspective: University of Manchester: Feedback, Evaluation and Development of an Enquiry Based Learning Module  Student perspective: University of Exeter: Students as Change Agents  University of Glasgow: Students and staff co_creating the curriculum  University of Glasgow: Enhanced student engagement through collaborative evaluation  Leeds Trinity University College: Rewriting the French Revolution Page 18
  19. 19. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 2 Partnership implementation Practice point Top tips Guide to sector resources The LFHE Student engagement toolkit for leaders provides some useful pointers for practices that leaders found effective in enhancing Student engagement in Higher Education:             Bringing student representatives onto all kinds of university structures, including those concerned with changes to systems, structures or processes (such as building project boards) in material ways – such as equal numbers of staff and students on programme committees. GOAT (go out and talk) & GOAL (go out and listen) - speaking informally, and often, to leaders and representatives of other sectors (students, senior managers, staff leaders, etc), to gauge their feelings and views, and developing strong personal relationships based on mutual respect Actively involving the university in students’ union activities Ensuring that the student representative system is truly representative of all constituencies within the student body, including “invisible” groups such as part-time students, student parents or students from elsewhere Active student involvement in the selection of senior managers with a high level of personal commitment to student engagement – and then holding them accountable to this commitment Reviewing procedures to ensure that these don’t themselves give rise to problems or complaints, and lightening the bureaucratic load “Closing the feedback loop” – ensuring that everybody sees the results and can celebrate the “wins” of engagement For managers and staff, wanting to see things from students’ perspectives, and being genuinely committed to ensuring students have a positive experience at university Shifting the official rhetoric to reflect a genuine prioritisation of partnership and community, and the prioritisation of student engagement, and ensuring consistent messages from senior management Not being A Manager – working against a “managerial” image to connect in a way that is meaningful to students / staff Replacing a culture of compliance with a culture of permission, tolerating “mess” and uncertainty Dogged persistence until the mindset and the culture change, so that collaborative approaches Page 19
  20. 20. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 2 Partnership implementation Practice point Top tips Guide to sector resources  become automatic and can be self-sustaining “Finding the right people” Involving Students in Change – planning document and guidance Student engagement is also a strong theme in the Changing the Learning Landscape programme, and the NUS have produced a useful planning document and guidance notes for anyone wishing to think through how students will be engaged in any new initiative: Involving Students in Change. 2.2 Develop a set of principles of good practice to follow for student partnerships  Questions  To what extent will a set of good practice principles help guide your project?  How could such principles be communicated to stakeholders?  Could such principles be used to inform institutional policies and curriculum design?      Develop your own set of principles of good practice to follow for instituting student partnerships and aim for about 7 key principles. Ensure principles are short, focus on headline argument, action oriented e.g. using action verbs, point to aspirations and use accessible language. For each principle, identify why it is important and any evidence to justify it. Use the principles as a core component of your stakeholder communications and engagement plan. Develop specific resources to help communicate the principles e.g. printed cards. Use every opportunity to re-enforce the principles in communications The HEA emphasise that partnerships is a process and a way of doing things. It has developed a set of principles around student engagement and effective partnership working:              Authenticity: where there is a clear rationale for students – and others – to work in partnership, each partner has a stake in the agenda and in taking the work forward Inclusivity: the absence of barriers that prevent engagement in partnership work Speaking ‘with’, not ‘for’ or ‘about’ students Being open to radical transformation, not just slotting partnership work into existing structures and processes A need for partnership work to be acknowledged and assented to by all parties involved Development of shared purpose, values and principles Taking time to understand our perceptions of one another and how that affects partnership relationships Joint decision making and accountability arrangements Equality of value whist recognising difference and the unique contribution each partner makes Acknowledgement of power relationships: being clear about where ownership for issues and agendas lies and how outcomes of work will be used. Being prepared to challenge structures and practices that re-affirm existing inequalities. Taking time to build trust Creating an environment that encourages risk taking Identifying resources to support partnership working Page 20
  21. 21. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 2 Partnership implementation Practice point Top tips    2.3 Allocate significant time and resource for stakeholder engagement and communications   Questions  To what extent will there likely be resistance to student partnership initiatives?  To what extent has the project evaluated different stakeholder’s interests and motivations with student partnerships?  To what extent has the project evaluated how best to engage different stakeholders?    Guide to sector resources and in documents, resources and publications that are created. Collaboratively develop a set of “practice points” for each principle that can help give students and staff ideas of how to put the principles into practice. As student partnerships mature, consider embedding principles in strategies, policies and processes. Use principles to inform and guide curriculum design.   Develop and implement a stakeholder communications and engagement plan using sector toolkits. In developing such a plan, take time to better understand how students as partners can help different stakeholders to meet their goals and interests. Celebrate successes and ensure external recognition is a key element of such a plan. Continually re-enforce the notion of students as equal partners (not assistants) and partnership working as the norm. Set high, but achievable expectations and continually ensure these are fully understood by all stakeholders. The University of Exeter has published its own Good Practice Guide on Engaging Stakeholders and includes a 10-minute tool designed to help other institutions consider how these strategies may work in their own context. Embracing a shared commitment to evaluation and learning Celebrating successful outcomes of and approaches to partnership working The following HEA documents are useful for addressing resistance to change: 53 Interesting Ways in which Colleagues Resist Change and 53 ways of managing resistance to change Steve Outram, Senior Adviser Higher Education Academy http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/assets/documents/resources/database/id554_complex_change_in_he is_paper6.doc http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/assets/documents/resources/database/id555_complex_change_in_he is_paper7.doc The Birmingham City University T-SPARC project produced a stakeholder engagement model which could be used when considering the development of student engagement activities. There are a range of Jisc resources and toolkits that support stakeholder communications and engagement: Page 21
  22. 22. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 2 Partnership implementation Practice point Top tips   Seek support and drive from senior management and ensure they understand how students as partners can help them fulfil their strategic and personal goals. Ensure communications and engagement with the wider student and staff bodies (i.e. not just those involved directly with partnership initiatives or the “educational elite”). Guide to sector resources     Jisc Infokit Communication and Collaboration Collaborative Online Tools Change management Sustaining and embedding innovations good practice guide The Jisc good practice guide includes the following guidance for planning stakeholder communications and engagement: Better understand the needs and concerns of different stakeholders. Different stakeholders will have different needs and concerns – for instance, practitioners are more likely to want to know why they should adopt and prioritise your project (as opposed to other innovations), if there is good evidence to support its pedagogical value, how it will benefit them/their students and the degree of support that they can expect, whilst heads of faculties/schools/departments maybe more likely to be concerned with resourcing, budgets and how to integrate innovations into their policies/plans. Develop a shared understanding of what they want to achieve by communicating and engaging with each stakeholder group. Too often, projects are concerned with purely producing the project outputs that they specified in the project plan. However, these outputs will be meaningless unless they are adopted by stakeholders – in the short, medium and long term. It is therefore worthwhile identifying what they want to achieve for each stakeholder group and ensuring these outputs are usable. For example, defining how many academics/teaching staff will make an informed choice as to whether they wish to adopt the innovation or establishing whether or not the innovation has been integrated into institutional or faculty/school/departmental strategies, processes, services and systems. It must, however, be recognised that projects may have to carefully balance the articulated needs from different stakeholder groups. Page 22
  23. 23. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 2 Partnership implementation Practice point Top tips Guide to sector resources Collaboratively develop a common set of key messages to communicate to different stakeholders as well as a plan to use both traditional and new media communications techniques. It is not uncommon to find different project team members giving out totally different key messages about the project. A collaborative exercise to develop key common messages about the innovations project will help to provide a more coherent approach to engaging with different stakeholders. Having stated that the development of “shared messages” is important, the emphasis on communications must be on interaction, dialogue and engagement – bearing in mind that the word “dissemination” has a rather one-way feeling about it! Communications plans should aim to convey simple messages based on the WHY – WHAT – WHEN – WHO – HOW principles e.g.      WHY: Why should academic/teaching staff change their teaching and learning practices? WHAT: What should academic/teaching staff change in their teaching and learning practices? WHEN: When best to make changes e.g. at curriculum review time? WHO: Who needs to be involved in the change? HOW: How to make the changes e.g. is it a DIY approach and what support is available? An excellent example that demonstrates effective communications is how the TESEP project based at Edinburgh Napier University helped to transform teaching and learning by providing simple messages e.g. based on:     Why do we need to change learning and teaching practice? Planning to transform. Rethinking your practices. Transformation stories. Page 23
  24. 24. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 2 Partnership implementation Practice point Top tips Guide to sector resources The NUS/QAA report 'Understanding the barriers to student engagement', is designed to contribute to the knowledge of the higher education sector on the barriers to engaging students in their learning experience. 2.4 Develop/acquire guides, toolkits and resources  Questions     To what extent has “best practice” in student partnerships been established? To what extent have the needs of different stakeholders for guides, toolkits and resources been established? To what extent has the project researched the availability of third-party guides, toolkits and resources e.g. from other institutions and educational agencies?      Engage with different stakeholders to identify their needs for guides, toolkits and resources. Adopt the “Top Tips” and, if appropriate, customise these to institutional needs and contexts. Use the “Viewpoints for student engagement” toolkit as part of initiative planning and teambuilding exercises. Recognise that best practice is continually evolving and join the Change Agent Network to keep upto-date with new approaches, toolkits and resources. Capture detailed case studies and share via the community of practice. Develop resources and toolkits that clearly and simply describe partnership models, role cards for staff and students (defining e.g. activities, responsibilities and logistical info), contract templates, briefing/induction resources etc. Regularly revisit the web-sites of the key educational agencies/bodies The Change Agent Network is a network of staff and students developed and funded by Jisc to support curriculum enhancement and innovation. It offers peer-support for students working as change agents and staff working with students in this capacity. Also available is institutional guidance, support and consultancy. Through the network there are possibilities for project promotion and dissemination as well as guidance on routes for recognition. The network is also able to run workshops and events. LFHE Student engagement toolkit for leaders This LFHE toolkit has been designed for use by leaders in Higher Education wishing to enhance and promote student engagement in, and beyond, their institutions. It can be used alongside the NUS / HEA Student Engagement Toolkit, which focuses on improving three specific areas of student engagement, namely representation, module feedback, and curriculum design. In this toolkit you will find:      Conceptual Overview of Student Engagement Leading for Engagement in Higher Education Powerpoint presentations on Student Engagement Workshop Resources References and Resources Oxford Brookes e_pioneers – support and resources NUS: Student Engagement Toolkit The Student Engagement Toolkit has useful info in Enhancing Engagement Practices e.g. Student engagement card-sort exercise The purpose of this activity is to enable pairs or small groups to discuss their beliefs and views about Page 24
  25. 25. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 2 Partnership implementation Practice point Top tips  which have major initiatives in the field of students as partners and change agents e.g. HEA, Jisc, HEFCE, HEFCW, SFC, NUS, sparqs and QAA Arrange access by students and staff to appropriate technology resources to support engagement, efficient partnership working, knowledge sharing and reflective practice. Guide to sector resources the role of students in institutional change, to support participants in clarifying their thinking in this area and to understand where there may be differences of opinion. The activity can be used with staff, students, or mixed groups. Enhancing engagement practices self-reflection task Using the four-stage picture of engagement as a reflective tool, this exercise challenges students’ representatives and institution managers and academics to evaluate their current student engagement practices. The focus of this task is to think about the outcomes of engagement activities and the impact that policies and practices have on students. Self-reflection task record matrix This matrix can be used to record the results of the self-reflection task. Representation systems benchmarking tool This tool, developed by NUS in partnership with the Association for Managers in Students’ Unions (AMSU), is designed to support students’ unions and institutions in evaluating their student representative structures. It can be used in isolation or to support the evidence-gathering process in the self-reflection task. The HEA’s Student Retention and Success programme has published the following:  Building student engagement and belonging in higher Education at a time of change: Final report from the What Works? Student Retention & Success programme.  An Executive summary: Summary of findings and recommendations from the What Works? Student Retention & Success programme. 2.5 Clarify detailed student and staff roles, responsibilities and activities.  Questions  To what extent has the project evaluated options  Define options for student roles together with associated key activities, how the roles will develop students, what students will bring to the roles and logistical information such as time commitments, training and support. Student change projects/activities The Oxford Brookes: InStePP Student e-Pioneer partnerships provides useful guidance on defining student and staff roles, responsibilities and activities e.g.      3-way contract Preferred partnerships Development wheel Roles and schedule Role cards Page 25
  26. 26. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 2 Partnership implementation Practice point   for different student roles? To what extent has the project specified what these roles entail in terms of activities, time commitments, skills required etc. To what extent has the project defined commercial, contractual and compliance requirements? Top tips        should involve students in planning, developing and delivering change in conjunction with staff support. Consider two key staff roles: partnership lead and development lead role. Consider employing student intern(s) to support and facilitate projects. Partnership lead should logistically support students with e.g. workplace induction, review progress against role descriptions. Provide sufficient and a broad range of student opportunities to work on innovation/change projects. Develop a three-way contract between students, development lead and partnership lead, incorporating role descriptions, responsibilities, activities and compliance with institutional procedures and requirements. Ensure the contracts incorporate engagement with induction, dissemination, support, record keeping, team-building and progress review and evaluation. Development lead should provide students with learning and support opportunities, reflective activities and feedback as well as exploring Guide to sector resources  Managing commissions The Jisc Design Studio outlines different student change agent roles e.g. Student Fellows at Bath Spa and Winchester The FASTECH project is focused on enhancing feedback and assessment processes through the use of technology. The project has recruited Student Fellows to participate in research activities, generate ideas, develop case studies, write blogs and attend and present at conferences. They are the interface between the project team and students and lecturers. Further guidance on the student fellows scheme is available here The FASTECH project also produced Student Fellows Briefing Paper about the Winchester BSU model Report of the ‘Leading academic engagement with students and students’ union’ project (LFHE and University of Winchester) Over the last decade there has been a steady and considerable increase in focus on student engagement. Rather than rehearse the well versed arguments about whether student engagement is important or not – it clearly is – this project has sought to examine 4 leading models of student engagement to capture their strengths and benefits for the students involved. Greenwich Digital Literacies in Transition project The University of Greenwich employed cross-university studentships to foster a community of student-led research to support and feed into all other aspects of the work of a project Greenwich Digital Literacies in Transition project. Termed the IRG (Interdisciplinary Research Group), this group included students, their mentors and members of staff from all aspects of the institution. Also see the 4Rmodel of student change agent engagement. University of Exeter - Students as Change Agents Students have been given opportunities to work in partnership with university staff in order to address the challenges of using technology with large and diverse cohorts. They have undertaken research on student views and perceptions, provided recommendations and solutions for practice, and have supported staff in bringing about wide-scale changes in teaching. Much of this work evolved through the Integrate project . Resources are available on the project website. The work continues Page 26
  27. 27. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 2 Partnership implementation Practice point Top tips  options for accreditation. The development lead role focuses more on student learning and development and the partnership lead focuses on making the partnership succeed. Guide to sector resources through projects such as the Cascade Digital Literacies project which involves postgraduate researchers. Podcast : Students as Agents of Change at Exeter Birmingham City University – Student Academic Partners The T-SPARC project engaged with students through the University’s Student Academic Partners (SAP) programme as part of a review of curriculum design practices and processes. SAP aims to integrate students into the teaching and pedagogic research community within BCU in order to develop collaboration between students and staff. The T-SPARC project also produced a wider stakeholder engagement model which could be used when considering the development of student engagement activities, and collaborated on a student engagement brochure with case studies from around the university. Reading Digitally Ready project has worked with students as partners in digital projects with academics, students as researchers, students feeding in their stories to inform work on the project and students undertaking work directly for the project. Synthesis of findings on leadership and student engagement Involving Students in Change – planning document and guidance Student engagement is also a strong theme in the Changing the Learning Landscape programme, and the NUS have produced a useful planning document and guidance notes for anyone wishing to think through how students will be engaged in any new initiative: Involving Students in Change. 2.6 Identify risks and how to manage them  Questions    To what extent has the projects identified and evaluated potential risk? In particular, to what extent could some Develop a risk management plan and review and update this regularly. Continually be aware of other institutional initiatives and how these impact on stakeholder workloads and priorities with a view to e.g. piggy-backing on and working with such projects to mutual benefit. JISC infoNet (infoKits) provide the following:   Risk management A 5 step risk management model Page 27
  28. 28. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 2 Partnership implementation Practice point  stakeholders react adversely to students as change agents? To what extent has the projects identified creative ways to address and manage such risks? Top tips      2.7 Establish/join external and internal communities of practice   Questions   To what extent could the project influence students to drive and facilitate a community of practice? To what extent could the  Guide to sector resources Be continually aware of “mission creep” – high expectations need to be balanced with realistic goals. Be aware of the dangers of a funding culture which can restrict sustainability. Identify likely points of resistance by different stakeholders – drawing on the experiences of previous sector innovation and change programmes – and develop appropriate approaches to counteract such resistance. Be aware that student change agents could possibly undermine institutional professional support staff – and develop win-win approaches to counteract this. Be aware of changing institutional policies and goals and adapt appropriately. Encourage students to develop a strategy and plan for an internal community of practice. Encourage students to lead the community of practice in support of partnership working between students and staff. Recognise the need for active facilitation by students and ensure that this is recognised as a key part of change agent activities (& The Greenwich Digital Literacies in Transition project featured cross-university studentships foster a community of student-led research to support and feed into all other aspects of the project. The Change Agent Network is a network of staff and students developed and funded by Jisc to support curriculum enhancement and innovation. It offers peer-support for students working as change agents and staff working with students in this capacity. Also available is institutional guidance, support and consultancy. Through the network there are possibilities for project promotion and dissemination as well as guidance on routes for recognition. The network is also able to run workshops and events. The Jisc Sustaining and embedding innovations good practice guide provides guidance in respect of Page 28
  29. 29. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 2 Partnership implementation Practice point project learn from and influence external communities of practice? Top tips      possibly incorporated into an accreditation scheme). Encourage students to join relevant professional body communities of practice. Monitor the emergence of new external communities of practice in the area of student partnerships and encourage links with these. Specifically, encourage students and staff to join and engage with the Change Agent Network. Develop processes to encourage students and staff to draw out key lessons learnt from their activities and make these available to other institutional staff and students. Encourage students and staff to read and contribute to the Journal of Educational Innovation, Partnership and Change. Guide to sector resources developing communities of practice e.g. http://raise-network.ning.com/ RAISE is a network of academics, practitioners, advisors and student representatives drawn from the Higher Education Sector who are working and/or interested in researching and promoting student engagement. The network creates opportunities to come together for beneficial scholarly discussion and creating collaborative projects, sharing good practice and lobbying for investment and better policies locally, sectorally and across our international community. http://studentlandtnetwork.ning.com/ The SLTN promotes active student engagement in learning and teaching communities. We provide a student led space for people in further and higher education with a passion for learning and teaching to meet, share experiences and empower others. http://www.sparqs.ac.uk Sparqs is an agency which puts students at the heart of decisions being made about the quality and governance of the learning experience. We are funded by the Scottish Funding Council, hosted and managed on their behalf by NUS Scotland, and directed by a Steering Committee with sector-wide membership. There are a number of critical success factors associated with successful Communities of Practice, as follows:  Ownership o Ownership primarily needs to lie with practitioners, not HE agencies. o A core steering group should drive forward the CoP/SIG aims and objectives.  Communications o CoPs/SIGs should develop a communications and stakeholder engagement strategy and plan. o Communications with stakeholders should be regular, high quality and profiled to different stakeholder needs. o Appropriate technologies should be adopted. Page 29
  30. 30. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 2 Partnership implementation Practice point Top tips Guide to sector resources o     Communications need to be co-ordinated and facilitated – though this does require significant effort to achieve (some CoP/SIGs rotate responsibilities for this in order to lessen the “load” on one individual). Activities o Steering Group members should commit to agreed “sweat labour” in respect of CoP/SIG activities. Resources/outputs o The CoP should aim to produce useful outputs, resources and toolkits (as appropriate) for use by its membership. Sustainability o Sustainability of CoPs/SIGs must be a core focus for the steering group and this must take account of what contributions the steering group and membership can make. o It must be recognised that the community membership and steering group will have limitations on how much time they can contribute without being funded or rewarded in some way. It is not good practice to adopt a total-funding approach, however, the steering group should consider potential reward mechanisms e.g. sector recognition of member’s work, publication of shared articles, journal and conference papers and aligning the CoP/SIG goals/activities with development/innovation projects and programmes. Financial o CoPs/SIGs should aim to seek funding – this could be in the form of e.g.  Agency funding to cover basic operational costs (typically low-amount funds from agencies such as the Higher Education Academy, JISC, QAA).  Project funding to fund specific collaborative projects which have defined outputs.  Advertising/sponsorship.  In-kind contributions e.g. institutions hosting meetings, travel funding. o If operational funding is available, it should be prioritised towards effective communications and stakeholder engagement. o CoPs/SIGs should not become “funding junkies” – they should primarily be driven by “sweat labour” from its membership and using micro-funding to cover operational essentials such as travel/meeting budgets. Page 30
  31. 31. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 3.3 Capabilities, development and accreditation 3 Capabilities, development and accreditation Practice point 3.1 Define core student capabilities, attributes and development frameworks for student innovation and change activities (1). Questions   To what extent have core student capabilities and attributes for working on partnership/change projects been identified? What teaching, learning and assessment approaches will be adopted to develop student personal, academic and professional skills? Top tips  Development frameworks focused on student innovation and change should consider addressing the following student capabilities and attributes: o Becoming a change agent o Working with stakeholders and institutional processes. o Analysing situations and environments (e.g.  departmental, institutional, sector, world) o Planning, running and evaluating a project. o Effective communication, negotiation, persuasion and team-building. o Identifying and describing change. o Planning, leading and delivering change. o Sustaining and embedding change. o Risk/conflict management and dealing with uncertainties. o Evaluating change, particularly in relation to impact of change. Guide to sector resources Oxford Brookes Institutional Student ePioneer Partnerships (InStePP Project) “Towards Accreditation” One of the InStePP project goals is to offer student ePioneers recognition pathways with Project partners . They looked specifically at endorsed recognition from two professional bodies : theInstitute of Leadership and Management (ILM) and the Association for Learning Technologists (ALT). Brookes Careers and Employability Centre already run an ILM-endorsed course - theFuture Leaders Certificate(.mov). The InStePP project has provided an opportunity to create a new endorsed certificate (Future Consultants) specifically for the InStePP student ePioneers and includes an adaptation of the ALT eportfolio framework (CMALT)and an adapted ILM learning skills framework. See Future Consultants update, Course outline, and suggested learning pathways / evidence (excel file) and the workshop on moving towards accreditation held with the cluster group on 27 March 2012. The Oxford Brookes Development Wheel indicates the range of learning and development the ePioneers undergo and the support that is provided while in Partnership. Jisc Digital Literacies resources e.g.   Digital Literacies conceptual frameworks Digital Literacies professional frameworks Jisc InfoNet provides some useful guidance on student engagement analytics. Page 31
  32. 32. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 3 Capabilities, development and accreditation Practice point Top tips  3.1 Define core student capabilities, attributes and development frameworks for student innovation and change activities (2).  Questions   To what extent have core student capabilities and attributes for working on partnership/change projects been identified? What teaching, learning and assessment approaches will be adopted to develop student personal, academic and professional skills?    Guide to sector resources o Effective use of technologies in change projects. o Ethical practices in change projects. The development framework should specify learning outcomes, outline curriculum design, support and assessment, which should all be aligned to relevant benchmarks and best practice with e.g. external accreditation bodies, QAA and HEA. Development frameworks should also focus on core student learning and development, capabilities and attributes e.g. o How people learn o Online learning o Creativity o Entrepreneurialism o Self-awareness o Reflection, personal and professional development. o Digital literacies. o Communications skills. Student development should be aligned with career planning. Development frameworks should include taught (preferably online) courses combined with a reflective portfolio that centres on a student change project/activities. Student capabilities should be Page 32
  33. 33. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 3 Capabilities, development and accreditation Practice point Top tips Guide to sector resources “stretched”. 3.2 Develop/acquire courses and training/learning resources for students and staff   Questions    To what extent do courses and training/learning resources already exist e.g. as open educational resources? What is the potential for undertaking collaborative developments with other institutions? To what extent should technology-enhanced approaches be adopted?     Ensure courses and training/ learning resources map to the student development framework. Adopt open source approaches to course development including the use of OERs (open educational resources) – which could include whole modules or reusable learning objects. Consider working collaboratively with other institutions to share their courses and/or share development of new courses. Engage students in course design, review and development. Adopt technology-enhanced approaches to aid efficiencies, flexibility and scalability. Assessments should aim to exploit computer-based techniques and adopt e-portfolios to underpin the student reflective portfolio. Jisc Open Educational Resources infoKit: Finding OERs A number of search engines exist to search Open Educational Resources. These include:  DiscoverEd - "Discover the Universe of Open Educational Resources"  Jorum - "free learning and teaching resources, created and contributed by teaching staff from UK Further and Higher Education Institutions"  OCWFinder - "search, recommend, collaborate, remix"  OER Commons - "Find Free-to-Use Teaching and Learning Content from around the World. Organize K-12 Lessons, College Courses, and more."  Temoa - "a knowledge hub that eases a public and multilingual catalog of Open Educational Resources (OER) which aims to support the education community to find those resources and materials that meet their needs for teaching and learning through a specialized and collaborative search system and social tools."  University Learning = OCW+OER = Free custom search engine - a meta-search engine incorporating many different OER repositories (uses Google Custom Search)  XPERT - "a JISC funded rapid innovation project (summer 2009) to explore the potential of delivering and supporting a distributed repository of e-learning resources created and seamlessly published through the open source e-learning development tool called Xerte Online Toolkits. The aim of XPERT is to progress the vision of a distributed architecture of e-learning resources for sharing and re-use."  OER Dynamic Search Engine - a wiki page of OER sites with accompanied search engine (powered by Google Custom Search)  The UNESCO OER Toolkit links to further useful, annotated resources and repositories.  JISC Digital Media maintain guidance on finding video, audio and images online, including those licensed as Creative Commons.  OER Glue - tool aiming to facilitate course building by 'stitching' together OERs from a range of sources. Jisc PADDLE project – Developing Digital Literacy This JISC funded project brings together represenatives from Coleg Llandrillo, Deeside College ,Coleg Harlech, Yale College and Coleg Menai who will be working collaboratively to develop staff and Page 33
  34. 34. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 3 Capabilities, development and accreditation Practice point Top tips Guide to sector resources learner engagement through establishing online Communities of Practice. Jisc Digital Literacies resources e.g.    3.3 Implement student personal & professional development planning using reflective practice and eportfolios  Questions    To what extent should student development be based on personalised development planning and reflective practice approaches? To what extent can such reflective practice and partnership working be supported using eportfolios?   Student personal and development planning using e-portfolios should align with the development framework and defined learning outcomes within the context of their change projects/activities. Students should be provided with diagnostics/self-review tools to aid them in developing their selfawareness and in processes of reflection, personal and professional development. Students should be provided with access to their own e-portfolio, where they can choose who to share this with (encouraging “ownership” by the student). E-portfolios can be used for planning and setting goals, reflecting, feedback, capturing and storing evidence, collaborating (e.g. Digital Literacies staff development materials Digital Literacies conceptual frameworks Digital Literacies professional frameworks Jisc Moving e-portfolios into the mainstream: new resources demonstrate how e-portfolios can transform the student journey Three resources to help universities and colleges to implement e-portfolios effectively at scale created from successful practice from the UK, Australia and New Zealand. The materials explore the ways in which you can help to boost learner achievement, enhance employability and even support the development of new courses. Key messages from from these resources have been synthesised in to a short guide, ‘Crossing the Threshold’ , which summarises the issues and benefits experienced by pioneer institutions and provides signposts to key aspects of the resources. Jisc Studies of e-portfolio implementation (videos and toolkit) Portfolio Special Interest Group (SIG) JISC CETIS Centre for Recording Achievement (CRA) Reports from the Australian Flexible Learning Framework in 2010, including: E-portfolios and Privacy Concept Guides; VET E-portfolios Privacy Draft Guidelines; VET E-portfolios Privacy Impact Assessment Research Report; Verifying VET Learner Attainment Data - 2010 Positioning Paper Crossing the threshold: Moving e-portfolios into the mainstream e-Portfolio Implementation Toolkit - an online resource providing rich stories of e-portfolio implementation, and resulting models and guidance for managers and practitioners Effective Practice with e-Portfolios e-Portfolios infoKit Page 34
  35. 35. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 3 Capabilities, development and accreditation Practice point Top tips     3.4 Develop academic and professional body recognition and accreditation opportunities for students   Questions  Guide to sector resources with mentors, peers and tutors) and presenting to audiences (e.g. for celebrating learning or sharing with potential employers). It should be stressed to students and staff that e-portfolios should underpin a high degree of collaboration between students, peers, mentors, tutors (& potentially other stakeholders) at all stages of student projects/activities. Multimedia data (e.g. captured from smartphones, tablets) can be collected as evidence e.g. audio/video interviews with stakeholders in change projects. Students should be made aware of the possible benefits of sharing their e-portfolios (including multimedia evidence) with potential employers. Students should be made aware of the potential to use/re-use/share eportfolio content for different purposes and different audiences. Australian ePortfolio Toolkit - a series of six guides designed to inform stakeholders in higher education about the issues and opportunities associated with e-portfolio based learning. Includes guides aimed at learners, managers, teachers and employers. e-Assessment: Guide to Effective Practice Guidance on the use of e-portfolios for assessment produced by the qualifications regulators for England, Wales and Northern Ireland. Survey students in terms of their preferences for recognition and accreditation. Consider assigning institutional academic credit to “change” courses e.g. as an academic module. Work with academic and Jisc Digital Literacies Associations (sector bodies and professional associations Jisc worked with in their Digital Literacies programme):    ALDinHE DL - Association for Learning Development in Higher Education ALT DL - Association for Learning Technology AUA DL - Association of University Administrators Page 35
  36. 36. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 3 Capabilities, development and accreditation Practice point   To what extent will student’s work need to be formally recognised and accredited? Who needs to be consulted in determining such recognition and accreditation? Top tips   professional bodies to develop accreditation for students via e.g. aligning student development frameworks with their development & accreditation frameworks. Work in collaboration with staff responsible for student employability and careers to explore such accreditation possibilities. Align student development frameworks to graduate attributes and employability. Guide to sector resources        HEDG DL - Heads of Educational Development Group ODHE DL - Organisational Development in Higher Education SCAP DL - Standing Conference on Academic Practice SCONUL DL - Society of College, National and University Libraries SDF DL - Staff Development Forum SEDA DL - Staff and Educational Development Association Vitae DL CMALT (Certified Membership of the Association for Learning Technologies) is the qualification available through theAssociation for Learning Technologies which is actively reviewed on a regular basis and is being used by a number of projects to enhance staff skills. The Digital Department has pioneered a new CMALT accreditation scheme for teaching administrators and other staff not typically identified as 'e-learning' professionals. Associated resources include: mapping, professional development plan andaccreditation plan, CMALT certification, timeline and guidance. SEDA and other professional associations involved in the programme have developed a Guide to Implementing the UKPSF in the Digital University, based on the UK Professional Standards Framework for HE. SEDA also manages a Professional Development Framework for teaching staff which includes named awards in Embedding Learning Technologies and Supporting Learning with Technologies. Digital competence frameworks for FE were defined by the PADDLE project: managers, tutors, learning resource staff, FE learners and ILS learners (learners with learning difficulties and disabilities SCONUL has produced a Digital Literacy Lens on the Seven Pillars of Information Literacy. It has also used the 8-folddefinition of digital literacies to audit current staff skills: although no mapping is proposed there is a good fit with the currentChartered Institute of Library & Information Professionals (CILIP) Body of Professional Knowledge. 3.5 Provide student/staff support  A range of online resources should be developed to support students and staff such as: Oxford Brookes ePioneers project details of support and resources for students and staff within their overall set of Resources. Page 36
  37. 37. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 3 Capabilities, development and accreditation Practice point Top tips Questions    To what extent do students and staff require support? What are the most appropriate and costeffective types of support? To what extent should technology-based approaches to support be adopted?    Guide to sector resources o Guides to setting up and implementing staff/student roles/partnership models o General guidance and good practice materials o Induction materials o Relevant forms and templates e.g. contract templates, consent forms, IPR forms o Diagnostics/self-review toolkits o Evaluation resources e.g. guides to undertaking evaluation and measuring impact o Guides on sustaining and embedding projects. o Compliance and etiquette guides in relation to e.g. IPR, data protection, privacy, slander/libel, H&S, ethical working, e-communications. o Guides to technologyenhanced working, communicating and learning. Each student should be assigned a member of staff “development lead” to support them. Consider providing mentoring for students from external stakeholders e.g. employers. Support students in exporting eportfolio content for future use e.g. in other systems and when moving Page 37
  38. 38. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 3 Capabilities, development and accreditation Practice point Top tips Guide to sector resources into employment/further study. 3.6 Provide relevant staff training and link to CPD  Questions   To what extent does staff require training. How should such training align with existing staff professional development approaches, recognition and accreditation?     3.4 Consideration should be given to adopting the “student change leader” development frameworks and courses and customising them for staff. Link the staff development framework in leading change to the HEA professional standards framework. Engage with HR/staff development teams to design the staff development frameworks in leading change. Consider approaches such as “buddying” where experienced staff help to train and support their peers. Develop a community of practice for staff and encourage experienced staff to record good practice techniques for sharing with peers. Leicester digital literacies framework and self-assessment tool for teaching staff in schools BCS Career Framework for IT professionals, relevant mainly to those working in the IT industry but with some reference to IT professionals in other contexts e.g. HE Institute for Learning Professional Formation statement, relevant to those teaching in Colleges Embed-IT framework, a meta-framework developed by the Work-with-IT project to support the embedding of IT related capabilities into a range of professional roles in HE. The HEA UK Professional Standards Framework (UKPSF) Changing the Learning Landscape: Online Activities A series of online events run by the partnership supports the CLL Professional Development Programme. This list will be updated as new webinars are confirmed. Click on the link for further information. Evaluation, impact and sustainability 4 Evaluation, impact & sustainability Practice point 4.1 Identify the rationale and need for evaluation. Top tips  Evaluation can sometimes be undertaken without fully Guide to sector resources Learning Technology Dissemination Initiative (Heriot Watt University) This article seeks to cover the principles for conducting an evaluation whether it is a small or a large Page 38
  39. 39. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 4 Evaluation, impact & sustainability Practice point Top tips Questions    What is the purpose of evaluation and how will it practically benefit the project? How can evaluation be used to support sustainability and embedding of projects? How can evaluation support stakeholder engagement?      appreciating the rationale – student partnership projects should therefore spend time questioning the reasons for undertaking evaluation, how it will be used and for what potential benefits. Evaluation should be used for identifying impact rather than just whether a project has met specific deliverables. As a formative “action research” process throughout a project, evaluation can support teams in reflecting on and evaluating their own progress, and support agile acting on lessons learned and responding to changing contexts. Evaluation can play an important accountability role. Evaluation can drive the sustainability and embedding agenda though e.g. identifying longterm goals, and providing evidence to align with (& influence) institutional policies. Evaluation can play an important role in building capacity and wider stakeholder engagement, through e.g. providing valuable evidence and resources to promote dialogue around what is possible, effective and what works. Guide to sector resources project. An understanding of the theory and background to evaluation is beneficial in order to better plan, design and conduct an evaluation programme. Above all there is no substitute for having a clear purpose for an evaluation, defining the right question is a prerequisite. Jisc Six Steps to Effective Evaluation Oxford Brookes InStePP Final Evaluation Report Greg Benfield & Metaxia Pavlakou Page 39
  40. 40. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 4 Evaluation, impact & sustainability Practice point Top tips   4.2 Choose appropriate qualitative and quantitative evaluation approaches.  Questions    How “ready” is the institution, students and staff to undertake student partnerships? How will the student partnership project define or indicate success and impact?    Guide to sector resources Evaluation can underpin celebrating student success and gaining external recognition. Evaluation can support benchmarking/collaborative selfreview with other institutions/student partnership projects. Carry out baseline activities to evaluate the current situation, seek stakeholder engagement and to inform project planning and evaluation plans. Develop an evaluation framework that focuses on measure/indicators of success – both for the project and for longer-term meeting of institutional goals (i.e. supporting the sustaining/embedding agenda). Consider adoption of formative/action research approaches based on e.g. implement, pilot, feedback, reflect, modify and implement. Consider appreciative enquiry approaches e.g. inquire, imagine, innovate and implement. Consider a “balanced scorecard” approach that uses a strategic management tool to help focus on different stakeholder’s perspectives, processes, staff Jisc: Learning the lessons through evaluation and research, Synthesis of evaluation approaches from the Transforming Curriculum Delivery through Technology Programme (Inspire Research – Rachel Harris) Jisc Methods for evaluating the learner experience of e-Learning Page 40
  41. 41. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 4 Evaluation, impact & sustainability Practice point Top tips  4.3 Adopt a range of data collection techniques to support evaluation.   Questions   How can students be used to undertake evaluation? What are the best techniques to use to evaluate student partnership projects?      Guide to sector resources development and finance. Consider use of external/internal evaluators and/or critical friends though ensure that their brief encompasses project sustainability and embedding. When base-lining, take advantage of existing data e.g. student surveys. Students should be tasked to research and evaluate projects as a key component of their roles as e.g. changes agents/researchers. Evidence that students collect as part of their e-portfolios can potentially be used for student partnership project evaluation, though appropriate permissions must be sought and agreed. Consider use of cognitive mapping techniques to aid triangulation of responses from surveys. Consider the use of focus groups and informal discussions to explore complex behaviour, clarify results from surveys and add human dimensions to impersonal data. Consider use of visual data to help convey complex concepts and seek feedback on these. Interviews enable in-depth investigation of issues and minimise individual interviewees being Page 41
  42. 42. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 4 Evaluation, impact & sustainability Practice point Top tips   4.4 Identify impact on a range of stakeholders and the institution  Questions   What areas should the project focus on to identify impact on specific stakeholders such as students, staff and employers? What areas should the project focus on to identify impact on the institution?  Guide to sector resources influenced by others. Questionnaires enable large samplers to be collected at relative low cost and in a standardised way though there are many disadvantages including survey fatigue and dangers of being incorrectly completed. Statistics are useful for evaluating usage patterns and tracking trends and changes, though are generally not useful for in-depth analysis. Student partnership projects should seek to evaluate impact on students as follows: o Student personal and professional development using e.g. the development framework and graduate attributes / employability frameworks. o Student satisfaction. o Student success in seeking and gaining employment. o Student academic development (e.g. scholarship, research, learning). Jisc evaluation resources (Design Studio) Jisc Different Routes to evidencing value (Rachel Harris) Synthesis of evaluation approaches from the Transforming Curriculum Design through Technology Programme (Rachel Harris) Impact on staff should be evaluated: o Staff satisfaction. o Staff development e.g. though Page 42
  43. 43. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 4 Evaluation, impact & sustainability Practice point Top tips Guide to sector resources CPD frameworks. o Staff culture.   4.5 Develop case studies for use with stakeholder communications and engagement. Impact on employers should also be evaluated: o Employer satisfaction. o Employer networking, engagement and partnerships. o Alumni collaboration. The impact on institutions should be evaluated as follows: o Contribution towards institutional goals and policies. o Recruitment and retention. o Student project impact e.g. on educational innovations, LT&A enhancements, efficiencies. o Contribution to institutional processes and effectiveness.  The purpose of case study production should be clearly identified together with plans for how they will be used as part of stakeholder engagement and project sustaining and embedding. Case studies can review an overall student partnership project as well as individual elements e.g. specific student projects, faculty implementation, staff development. Core “template” questions should Questions    How can case studies best be used to aid stakeholder communications and engagement? How can case studies be  Jisc: The Guide to Researching Audiences: Case Studies Page 43
  44. 44. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 4 Evaluation, impact & sustainability Practice point  Top tips used to sustain and embed student partnership projects? What should case studies contain?   Guide to sector resources be addressed such as: o What were the background, context, need and rationale? o What were the aims and objectives? o What was undertaken? o What was the impact and benefits? o What were the issues and challenges? o What lessons were learned? o What were the unexpected outcomes? o What are the key points for effective practice? o Conclusions and recommendations. Case studies could also aim to capture detailed “how to” information to aid other practitioners in planning similar activities in different contexts e.g. costs, resources required, impact on staff/student workloads, costbenefits, IPR issues, ethics issues, compliance requirements. Multimedia techniques (e.g. using smartphones, tablets, digital still/video cameras, digital audio recorders) can be used to capture e.g. audio/video interviews and testimonials all of which can be used for both evaluation and in Page 44
  45. 45. Guide to Instituting Student Partnerships 4 Evaluation, impact & sustainability Practice point Top tips   4.6 Develop recommendations for sustaining student partnerships as part of evaluation.  Questions    How can evaluation processes be used to support the sustaining of student partnership projects? How can evaluation best be used to influence and gain support from senior managers?   Guide to sector resources wider stakeholder communications. Case study data should be thought of as “reusable data objects” i.e. case studies should be presented in different ways for different audiences and contexts. Collecting data for case studies should commence early on in projects (e.g. when base-lining commences) and continue throughout a project and align with evaluation activities. The evaluation processes should aim to produce a clear set of options for sustaining the project, outlining the pros and cons of each option and how they align with institutional policies. Each option should explore how they can be implemented together with challenges and risks as well as time and resource commitments required from staff. Explore with senior management how student partnerships can support, influence and shape institutional policies and responding to changing drivers and needs as well as how best to organisationally take forward student partnerships. Collaboration opportunities should be explored with external Jisc Sustaining and Embedding Good Practice Guide Page 45

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