1
SUMMARY ON
SMART GRIDS &
SMART METERS
CEES PUNE
1
2
AMR - Automatic
Meter Reading
AMI – Advanced
Metering Infrastructure
AGI – Advanced
Grid Infrastructure
Benefits
Revenue...
3
•Planning
•CIS
•GIS
•OMS
•WFM
•AVL
•Asset Mgmt
•Others
• AMI
• SCADA
• Crew
Dispatch
• Generation
& load
dispatch
• Othe...
4
Core AMI Technology  PLC RF Mesh RF Tower Digital Cellular WiMAX / WiFi
Vendors
Aclara
Cooper
L+G
Cooper
Elster
Itron
L...
5
Need for MDM:
CEES PUNE
5
Multiple
data
sources
Accurate
and timely
data
Secure
data
storage
Create and
disseminate
info...
6
Motivation for the
Standardization Roadmap
• Support of the vision „Smart Grid“ during realization
– The importance of s...
7
Motivation for a Smart Grid on the basis of the energy management triangle –
political
objectives and technical implemen...
8
Definition of „Smart Grid“ –
One example of the DKE-Committee SMART.GRID
The term „Smart Grid“ (an intelligent energy su...
9
Communication between
system components
Smart Grid – Intelligent Energy Supply
CEES PUNE
Interdisciplinary technologies:...
10
A lot of further definitions about the
term
„Smart Grid“• IEC
• European Technology Platform ETP Smart Grids
• ERGEG – ...
11
What is a Smart Grid?
Like blinded men with an elephant.
CEES PUNE
Quelle: E-Energy Jahreskongress 2009
Prof. Gunter Du...
12
Integration into the
International Standardization
CEES PUNE
IEC Council
SMB
Technical Committees
e.g. TC 57
WG
13
Inte...
13
SMART GRID: WHAT IS IT?
• New metering and communication system,
.e.g, “smart” meters: demand response;
pricing options...
14
SMART GRID: JURISDICTION
• Federal policies are not mandatory; states have discretion about adopting
any PURPA policies...
15
Smart Grid: What is the purpose?
• More efficient operations, .e.g. eliminate meter reading
and field visit jobs
• Enab...
16
SMART METERING
• Advanced or smart meters: Only achieves part of this
vision
• Most utilities focus primarily on Advanc...
17
Consumers Have Serious Questions
about Smart Metering
• Costs:
– Rate impacts
– Technology obsolescence
– Retire existi...
18
CONSUMER CONCERNS ABOUT COSTS
• Utilities often seek separate tracker to assure cost
recovery outside of a base rate ca...
19
CONSUMER CONCERNS ABOUT
BENEFITS
• Benefits are estimated over a 15-20 year period; degree of
accuracy never calculated...
20
CONSUMER CONCERNS ABOUT
BENEFITS
• Utilities seek to justify their smart metering approach
without any analysis of alte...
21
CONSUMER CONCERNS ABOUT
DYNAMIC PRICING
• AMI is being used as a justification for demanding that
residential customers...
22
CONSUMER CONCERNS ABOUT
CONSUMER PROTECTIONS
• Utilities typically couple smart metering with the functionality of
remo...
23
SMART GRID AND THE CUSTOMER SIDE OF THE METER: WHO IS
IN CHARGE?
• Promoters of a “smarter” grid emphasize how customer...
24
SMART GRID AND ELECTRIC POWERED
VEHICLES
• An EV will increase household load factor by 50% or more at peak
hours (sour...
25
T&D INVESTMENTS
• Smart Grid investments for T&D systems
should be linked to delivery of customer
benefits:
– Establish...
26
SMART GRID: REGULATORY
RESPONSE
• KEY RECOMMENDATION: Let’s be “smart”
about “smart grid”
– Utilities should link propo...
27
WE NEED SMART REGULATORY POLICIES FOR SMART
GRID
• Endorsement of utilities “wants” based on magic words or
inchoate pr...
28
OUT LINE
 What is Smart Meter
 Why we have to develop Smart Meter
 Smart Meter to Smart Grid
 Smart Grid
 Smart gr...
29
What is Smart Meter
compare with tradition meter
• A new electricity meter
which can eliminate many
labor-intensive bus...
30
Why we have to develop Smart Meter
• Greenhouse effect
• Economize power by
change our way in using
power
• Decrease po...
31
Smart Meter to Smart Grid
• Smart Grid is a concept of
use power efficiently
• AMI support the Smart
Grid of the future...
32
Smart Grid(1/2)
• keeps track of all electricity flowing in the system
• use superconductive transmission lines for les...
33
Smart Grid(2/2)
CEES 6/14/2014 33
34
Smart grid functions
• Be able to heal itself
• consumers participation
• Resist attack
• Provide higher quality power
...
35
Obstacles
• regulatory environments that don't
reward utilities for operational
efficiency
• consumer concerns over pri...
36
Smart Grid in Other Countries(1/2)
• Europe
– Grid upgrade plan
– Legislation
• America
– U.S. stimulus package
– “Thre...
37
Smart Grid in Other Countries(2/2)
• China
– An plan to develop a national smart grid by 2020
– Smart grid city
• Japan...
38
Learn from Other Countries
• Technology Upgrade
– “Three Advanced”
– To improve…
• Integration
• Standardization
• Loca...
39
Smart Grid in Taiwan
• a plan by Taiwan power since 2008
– 1st stage(08~09)
• UHV users
• AMR
(Automatic Meter Reading ...
40
Future Life with Smart Grid
CEES 6/14/2014 40
41
Quotation
• http://www.digitimes.com.tw/tw/dt/n/shwnws.asp?CnlID=13&Cat=&Cat1=&id=167866
• http://blog.udn.com/ctang/23...
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Lect k week 12 summary on smart meters & sg 1

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  • Weitere Gründe unter Nutzen der Normung im weiteren Verlauf
    In anderen Diskussionen wird aber seltener konkret auf Normung und Standardisierung eingegangen
  • Verschiedene Perspektiven zeigen sich schon bei den unterschiedlichen Definitionen
    Unterschiedliche Perspektiven wurden diskutiert und beschrieben. Im folgenden auf einen Aspekt nur eingehen
  • Lect k week 12 summary on smart meters & sg 1

    1. 1. 1 SUMMARY ON SMART GRIDS & SMART METERS CEES PUNE 1
    2. 2. 2 AMR - Automatic Meter Reading AMI – Advanced Metering Infrastructure AGI – Advanced Grid Infrastructure Benefits Revenue mgmt. Reduced intrusion Circa 1985 Circa 2000 Circa 2007 Typical Functionality Monthly kWh readings Daily kWh readings Disconnect / reconnect On-demand reads Outage management support Load control Limited hourly data Expanded hourly data Demand Response Downline automation Home area network interface Technologies Walk-by radio Drive-by radio Fixed radio PLC – 1 way PLC – 2 way Fixed/Tower RF–2 way Star and mesh radio Broadband/WiMax?? Customer service Outage restoration Asset management Enhanced customer svc. Outage identification System planning Reduced losses Demand response Feeder automation Web applications ? Evolution of Advanced Metering CEES PUNE 2
    3. 3. 3 •Planning •CIS •GIS •OMS •WFM •AVL •Asset Mgmt •Others • AMI • SCADA • Crew Dispatch • Generation & load dispatch • Others Data Acquisition and Control Data Management Engine(s) Integration Bus Applications Wide Area Network Strategies • Backhaul / bulk • Medium to broadband • Data, video, voice • Public and private • RF, fiber, satellite Local Area Network Strategies • “Last Mile” and AMI systems • Low to Medium band • RF and PLC Home Area Networks • Emerging technologies • Zigbee, Insteon, Z- Wave, 6LoWPAN, etc Home automation & generation Meters Down-line automation & asset management Crew Mgmt. Substations Typical Smart Grid components CEES PUNE 3
    4. 4. 4 Core AMI Technology  PLC RF Mesh RF Tower Digital Cellular WiMAX / WiFi Vendors Aclara Cooper L+G Cooper Elster Itron Landis+Gyr SilverSpring Tantalus (hybrid) Trilliant Sensus Aclara SmartSynch Consert Other start-ups SkyTeq Other start-ups Optimal deployment scenarios Rapid, system wide Rapid, system wide Rapid, system wide Targeted Trial system (in 2 – 3 years) Communications status Power-Line Unlicensed Licensed Public Public Maturity of systems High Moderate Moderate Very Low Very Low Capital cost of Infrastructure : annual operating expense Medium : Low Medium : Low Medium : Low Low : High High : Medium Data throughput Low to moderate Moderate to high Moderate to high Moderate to high Very High Ability to serve customer based SmartGrid applications Low to medium Medium to high Medium to high Medium to high High Ability to serve SmartGrid applications Medium High High Low High Summary Technology comparison CEES PUNE 4
    5. 5. 5 Need for MDM: CEES PUNE 5 Multiple data sources Accurate and timely data Secure data storage Create and disseminate information • AMI • Manual Readings • SCADA • OMS • MWF • Other • Validating, Editing and Estimating (for hourly data) • Standards and rules for service order creation • Proactive assurance of data availability • Audit trail • Securely manages 1,000 times more data/meter than CIS or AMI systems can. • Tags for weather, demographic and other operational characteristics • Manage and access non-traditional meter data, e.g., PQ, volts, etc. • Interface to billing systems • Interface for Customer Service Reps • Create TOU billing summaries • Provide summary data • Support operation & planning needs • Platform for customer web presentment
    6. 6. 6 Motivation for the Standardization Roadmap • Support of the vision „Smart Grid“ during realization – The importance of standardization is emphasized in all discussion about Smart Grid  Chapter 3.4 – Benefits of Smart Grids and their standardization • A lot of standardization activities are starting – Standardization roadmap as basis for a German position in national and international standardization – Providing the knowledge from R&D projects like the German E-Energy- Projects in standardization • Intersectoral topic with a lot of stakeholders and interfaces – Collecting and summarizing various national activities • Information about existing standards and current activities – „Not reinventing the wheel again and again“ CEES PUNE
    7. 7. 7 Motivation for a Smart Grid on the basis of the energy management triangle – political objectives and technical implementation CEES PUNE Avoidance of grid bottlenecks Electromobility Distribution and Renewable Energy Resources Storage Energy efficiency Growth in consumption Energy autonomy Security of supply Society Political Objectives Technology / Implementation
    8. 8. 8 Definition of „Smart Grid“ – One example of the DKE-Committee SMART.GRID The term „Smart Grid“ (an intelligent energy supply system) comprises • networking and control of intelligent generators, storage facilities, loads and network operating equipment • in power transmission and distribution networks • with the aid of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). • The objective is to ensure sustainable and environmentally sound power supply by means of transparent, energy- and cost-efficient, safe and reliable system operation. CEES PUNE
    9. 9. 9 Communication between system components Smart Grid – Intelligent Energy Supply CEES PUNE Interdisciplinary technologies: Data collection, processing and recombination Market Grid Operation Smart Grid Smart Generation Smart Distribution and Transmission Smart Consumption Smart Storage
    10. 10. 10 A lot of further definitions about the term „Smart Grid“• IEC • European Technology Platform ETP Smart Grids • ERGEG – European Regulators • BDEW - German Association of Energy and Water Industries • NIST National Institute for Standards and Technology • … CEES PUNE
    11. 11. 11 What is a Smart Grid? Like blinded men with an elephant. CEES PUNE Quelle: E-Energy Jahreskongress 2009 Prof. Gunter Dueck Various perspectives on a Smart Grid
    12. 12. 12 Integration into the International Standardization CEES PUNE IEC Council SMB Technical Committees e.g. TC 57 WG 13 International Standardization System operators /suppliers Manufacturers Consultants Academics Authorities (GOs) Other organizations (NGOs) European standardization Technical Committee e.g. DKE K 952 AK 15 AK 10 National Standardization System operators /suppliers Manufacturers Consultants Academics Authorities (GOs) Other organizations (NGOs) WG 14 AK 19 WG 19
    13. 13. 13 SMART GRID: WHAT IS IT? • New metering and communication system, .e.g, “smart” meters: demand response; pricing options • T&D investments to “modernize” communications, sensors, grid design and operation: manage outages; energy storage; intermittent resources • Customer side of the meter: In Home Devices CEES 6/14/2014 13
    14. 14. 14 SMART GRID: JURISDICTION • Federal policies are not mandatory; states have discretion about adopting any PURPA policies, including Smart Grid policies in the Energy Policy Acts of 2005 and 2007 • FERC regulates wholesale markets and supervises RTOs; required to establish “just and reasonable” rates • States regulate utility distribution rates (and generation supply portfolios and rate design in states with and without restructuring); approve cost recovery; establish retail tariffs and prices for retail electricity service • Smart Grid is primarily a matter for state regulation CEES 6/14/2014 14
    15. 15. 15 Smart Grid: What is the purpose? • More efficient operations, .e.g. eliminate meter reading and field visit jobs • Enable Demand Response programs: direct load control, dynamic pricing • Enable distributed resources to be integrated into grid operations • Improve reliability of service: outage detection and management • Improve grid operations and efficiency; integrate renewables • Link customer’s side of the meter to utility operations: in-home devices, appliances CEES 6/14/2014 15
    16. 16. 16 SMART METERING • Advanced or smart meters: Only achieves part of this vision • Most utilities focus primarily on Advanced Metering systems and rarely propose Smart Grid plans or investment decisions • Smart Meter proposals often claim to represent crucial part of future Smart Grid plans • Unknown ratepayer costs for investment to obtain modernization of the Transmission and Distribution grids CEES 6/14/2014 16
    17. 17. 17 Consumers Have Serious Questions about Smart Metering • Costs: – Rate impacts – Technology obsolescence – Retire existing working meters • Benefits: – Operational cost savings: elimination of jobs re meter reading; field operations – Demand Response: implementation of dynamic pricing – Energy conservation or consumption reduction – Part of implementation of Smart Grid for T&D operations: integrate renewables; enable Electric Vehicles CEES 6/14/2014 17
    18. 18. 18 CONSUMER CONCERNS ABOUT COSTS • Utilities often seek separate tracker to assure cost recovery outside of a base rate case: consumers bear full responsibility for actual costs as they occur • Potential for higher bills for low use and low income customers • New technologies: who bears risk of wrong choice? [VCRs vs. DVDs vs. DVRs] • Smart Metering proposals may be only a downpayment on unknown future Smart Grid investments CEES 6/14/2014 18
    19. 19. 19 CONSUMER CONCERNS ABOUT BENEFITS • Benefits are estimated over a 15-20 year period; degree of accuracy never calculated • To document cost effectiveness, utilities sometimes seek demand response and supply side benefits that make up over 50% of costs and that require estimates of future prices of capacity and energy • Demand Response benefits have yet to be proven in any full scale implementation of dynamic pricing: customer participation rates; persistence of results; impacts of wholesale market structure on value of DR and means to return this value to customers • Can low use and low income/elderly customers see benefits or only costs? • Who bears the risk that these estimates are wrong? CEES 6/14/2014 19
    20. 20. 20 CONSUMER CONCERNS ABOUT BENEFITS • Utilities seek to justify their smart metering approach without any analysis of alternative means to obtain DR results from residential customers: direct load control works and is less costly; do not need AMI for this technology • Utilities typically do not include customer costs to actually bring the usage data into the home or connect to any appliance: in-home devices and new appliances are not cheap! • Estimated price for the new EV autos? $40,000 and more CEES 6/14/2014 20
    21. 21. 21 CONSUMER CONCERNS ABOUT DYNAMIC PRICING • AMI is being used as a justification for demanding that residential customers move to TOU or dynamic pricing as “default” • Consumers want and need stable and fixed prices for service essential to their health and well being • TOU rates NOT popular for a reason • Concern about bill impacts on some customer groups: low income; elderly; disabled. CA pilot results show very low elasticity of demand for low income but rarely studied directly CEES 6/14/2014 21
    22. 22. 22 CONSUMER CONCERNS ABOUT CONSUMER PROTECTIONS • Utilities typically couple smart metering with the functionality of remote connection and disconnection of the meter; disconnection for nonpayment should be accompanied by a premise visit and attempt to contact the customer to avoid disconnection • These new meters may give rise to a host of degraded service options, e.g., prepayment (pay in advance and automatically disconnect when meter is not fed); service limiters • New privacy concerns will become evident with the access to individual household usage information: Is anybody home? What appliances are being used? Who can access this data and for what purpose? CEES6/14/2014 22
    23. 23. 23 SMART GRID AND THE CUSTOMER SIDE OF THE METER: WHO IS IN CHARGE? • Promoters of a “smarter” grid emphasize how customers can be “empowered” • Dynamic pricing does not “empower” customers; it presents a Hobson’s Choice to many low use, low income, and elderly customers who must use electricity during peak hours • Customers prefer Peak Time Rebate option in which customers are rewarded for peak load reduction CEES 6/14/2014 23
    24. 24. 24 SMART GRID AND ELECTRIC POWERED VEHICLES • An EV will increase household load factor by 50% or more at peak hours (source: BG&E executive) • Significant burden on utility transformers and distribution system • What if off-peak usage gets more expensive due to demand? • Questions: – Who pays: all customers or cost causers? Ratepayers or taxpayers? – Should this potential development be used to demand TOU rates for all? – Can plug in devices control time of energy flow? – In home or neighborhood plug in options? CEES 6/14/2014 24
    25. 25. 25 T&D INVESTMENTS • Smart Grid investments for T&D systems should be linked to delivery of customer benefits: – Establish a baseline that identifies current status of smart grid investments in T&D systems – Condition rate recovery to enforceable reliability objectives— reduce frequency and duration of outages; reduce customer outage costs – Target distribution investments where they are likely to have most significant results – Demonstrate ability to integrate intermittent resources and distributed resources CEES 6/14/2014 25
    26. 26. 26 SMART GRID: REGULATORY RESPONSE • KEY RECOMMENDATION: Let’s be “smart” about “smart grid” – Utilities should link proposed investments to specific functionalities – What incremental investments are required? Who pays? – At what cost? Over what period of time? – What enforceable promises are made to deliver the benefits to end use customers? CEES 6/14/2014 26
    27. 27. 27 WE NEED SMART REGULATORY POLICIES FOR SMART GRID • Endorsement of utilities “wants” based on magic words or inchoate promises would not be “smart” • Presumption should be for rate recovery that links costs and benefits: utilities must assume some of the risks that their estimates are wrong • Base rate recovery preferred to separate trackers or surcharges • Smart Grid and smart metering must not be used as a means to impose dramatic changes in retail rate design for residential customers – Dynamic and time-based price programs must remain optional on an “opt in” basis – Rewards in the form of credits for peak usage reduction should be the preferred approach CEES 6/14/2014 27
    28. 28. 28 OUT LINE  What is Smart Meter  Why we have to develop Smart Meter  Smart Meter to Smart Grid  Smart Grid  Smart grid functions  Obstacles  Smart Grid in Other Countries  Learn from Other Countries  Smart Grid in Taiwan  Future Life with Smart Grid CEES 6/14/2014 28 V.S
    29. 29. 29 What is Smart Meter compare with tradition meter • A new electricity meter which can eliminate many labor-intensive business process • You can know power using information in every hour, or even in every second • The part of Advanced Metering Infrastructure ( AMI ) CEES 6/14/2014 29
    30. 30. 30 Why we have to develop Smart Meter • Greenhouse effect • Economize power by change our way in using power • Decrease power wasting caused by meter CEES 6/14/2014 30
    31. 31. 31 Smart Meter to Smart Grid • Smart Grid is a concept of use power efficiently • AMI support the Smart Grid of the future • Smart Grid provide advance metering CEES 6/14/2014 31
    32. 32. 32 Smart Grid(1/2) • keeps track of all electricity flowing in the system • use superconductive transmission lines for less power loss • It can run at arbitrary hours • the capability of integrating alternative sources • multiple networks and multiple power generation companies with multiple operators employing • provide the bi-directional metering needed to compensate local producers of power CEES 6/14/2014 32
    33. 33. 33 Smart Grid(2/2) CEES 6/14/2014 33
    34. 34. 34 Smart grid functions • Be able to heal itself • consumers participation • Resist attack • Provide higher quality power • Accommodate all generation • Enable electricity markets to flourish • Optimize assets • Enable higher penetration of intermittent power generation sources CEES 6/14/2014 34
    35. 35. 35 Obstacles • regulatory environments that don't reward utilities for operational efficiency • consumer concerns over privacy • social concerns over "fair" availability of electricity • limited ability of utilities to rapidly transform their business and operational environment to take advantage of smart grid technologies CEES 6/14/2014 35
    36. 36. 36 Smart Grid in Other Countries(1/2) • Europe – Grid upgrade plan – Legislation • America – U.S. stimulus package – “Three Advanced” • Advanced Hardware • Advanced Software/Systems • Advanced Materials CEES 6/14/2014 36
    37. 37. 37 Smart Grid in Other Countries(2/2) • China – An plan to develop a national smart grid by 2020 – Smart grid city • Japan – Island micro-grid: Solar energy – Smart grid island CEES 6/14/2014 37
    38. 38. 38 Learn from Other Countries • Technology Upgrade – “Three Advanced” – To improve… • Integration • Standardization • Localization – Ex: Renewable source • User friendly CEES 6/14/2014 38
    39. 39. 39 Smart Grid in Taiwan • a plan by Taiwan power since 2008 – 1st stage(08~09) • UHV users • AMR (Automatic Meter Reading System) – 2nd stage(10~11) • HV users • Domestic smart grid – 3rd stage(11~) • LV users • universal CEES 6/14/2014 39
    40. 40. 40 Future Life with Smart Grid CEES 6/14/2014 40
    41. 41. 41 Quotation • http://www.digitimes.com.tw/tw/dt/n/shwnws.asp?CnlID=13&Cat=&Cat1=&id=167866 • http://blog.udn.com/ctang/2324868 • http://translate.google.com.tw/translate?hl=zh-TW&sl=en&tl=zh- TW&u=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FSmart_grid • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qjyugl8Hncw&feature=related • http://www.taiwangreenenergy.org. • http://fund.pchome.com.tw/magazine/report/po/taiwannews/1850/1267027200607950020 01.htmtw/Domain/domain-5.aspx • http://www.eettaiwan.com/ART_8800588601_480402_TA_b76706cb.HTM • http://www.libnet.sh.cn:82/gate/big5/www.istis.sh.cn/list/list.aspx?id=5398 • “Smart Grid” Thomas J. Gentile, 2009 IEEE-USA Annual Meeting CEES 6/14/2014 41

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