Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Case Study : Post Tsunami Housing in Kirinda by Shigeru Ban

2,874 views

Published on

An Architectural case study on Post Tsunami Housing in Kirinda, Sri Lanka by Architect Shigeru Ban.

Published in: Education
  • accessibility Books Library allowing access to top content, including thousands of title from favorite author, plus the ability to read or download a huge selection of books for your pc or smartphone within minutes ,Download or read Ebooks here ... ......................................................................................................................... Download FULL PDF EBOOK here { https://urlzs.com/UABbn }
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • DOWNLOAD FULL BOOKS, INTO AVAILABLE FORMAT ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. PDF EBOOK here { https://tinyurl.com/y6a5rkg5 } ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. EPUB Ebook here { https://tinyurl.com/y6a5rkg5 } ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. doc Ebook here { https://tinyurl.com/y6a5rkg5 } ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. PDF EBOOK here { https://tinyurl.com/y6a5rkg5 } ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. EPUB Ebook here { https://tinyurl.com/y6a5rkg5 } ......................................................................................................................... 1.DOWNLOAD FULL. doc Ebook here { https://tinyurl.com/y6a5rkg5 } ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... ......................................................................................................................... .............. Browse by Genre Available eBooks ......................................................................................................................... Art, Biography, Business, Chick Lit, Children's, Christian, Classics, Comics, Contemporary, Cookbooks, Crime, Ebooks, Fantasy, Fiction, Graphic Novels, Historical Fiction, History, Horror, Humor And Comedy, Manga, Memoir, Music, Mystery, Non Fiction, Paranormal, Philosophy, Poetry, Psychology, Religion, Romance, Science, Science Fiction, Self Help, Suspense, Spirituality, Sports, Thriller, Travel, Young Adult,
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

Case Study : Post Tsunami Housing in Kirinda by Shigeru Ban

  1. 1. Post-Tsunami Housing Kirinda, Sri Lanka Rajiv Babu, 30
  2. 2. Facts • Principal Architect: Shigeru Ban Architects • Local Architect: PWA Architects • Client: Philip Bay • Design: 2005 • Completed: 2006 • Area of single unit: 71 sq metres • Number of units: 67 • Cost per unit: USD 15,000 • Overall Cost: USD 1.7 million • Site Area: 15900 sq metres The Architect Shigeru Ban is a Japanese architect, known for his innovative work with paper, particularly recycled cardboard tubes used to quickly and efficiently house disaster victims. Winner of 2014 Pritzker, for his innovative use of material and his dedication to humanitarian efforts around the world
  3. 3. • Kirinda, a small Muslim fishing village affected by the Indian Ocean tsunami on 26 December, 2004 • Involved construction of 67 houses, a mosque and tree plantation • The houses are spread around Kirinda, in an area of 15,900 sq metres Intro
  4. 4. Site • Level site, close to the sea • Village buildings are on either side of the road • Landscape include paddy fields, lakes, coconut plantations and sandy beaches • Tropical climate with high humidity and very little seasonal variation in temperature • Typical local architecture includes single- storey detached constructions composed of concrete blocks, corrugated-iron roof sheeting and timber
  5. 5. • Climate played a significant role in conditioning the design, with ensuring ventilation a prominent consideration • The houses were designed to allow maximum cross ventilation • Slatted upper walls at the gable ends, the open court space in the middle of the building The Design
  6. 6. • The open court space in the middle of the building was designed to provide a shaded, ventilated area where inhabitants could carry out various important functions, such as eating, socializing and repairing fishing nets and other equipment. • The separation of the hall and the roofed court with folding doors was designed with women’s privacy in mind, so that women could remain unseen by guests
  7. 7. Materials • The principal material was compressed earth blocks (CEB), a compressed mixture of sunbaked clay and cement available in Sri Lanka at a low cost. • Parts of the walls were also composed of prefabricated furniture units made from rubber trees, which is also a locally sourced natural material • Clay tiles were used on the roof, on top of the timber trusses. • A slatted timber screen was used for the top section of the walls at both gable ends and between the hall and the roofed court. • Wooden panels were used for folding doors between the hall and the roofed court. Wood sections that were crafted off site were made from teak, coconut and rubber trees. Varnish was not used on the exterior panels.
  8. 8. • The majority of the materials were sourced from Sri Lanka including the CEBs, the rubber furniture units and the clay roofing tiles the homes were designed to be assembled from modular units prefabricated in a local workshop, off site • Due to its strength, a central pillar made from coconut wood was used to support the roof • The simple CEB construction technology that was utilized allowed villagers to be directly involved in the workforce and thereby to gain valuable skills
  9. 9. Analysis • The separation of the hall and the roofed court with folding doors was designed with women’s privacy in mind, so that women could remain unseen by guests. But the decision to locate the kitchen and bathroom within the building is problematic for some residents due to the greater visibility of women • The open court space is exposed to other houses, which may pose an issue regarding privacy • Some inhabitants have adapted the design by blocking up the court through cement blocks walls
  10. 10. • The increased exposure to the outside results in dust entering the house, as well as rain entering the bedrooms at the gable end due to the roof not overhanging sufficiently to shelter the structure from the rain • The houses do not feature drainpipes, so that rainwater simply runs off the roof to the ground
  11. 11. • Challenge to encourage people for utilising CEBs. The inhabitants have opted to use large concrete blocks for additional walls, rather than utilize CEBs as featured in the original design • Houses are structurally robust, with the wooden roof trusses securely attached to the walls and sufficiently sturdy and heavy to withstand high winds and earthquakes
  12. 12. Inference • The local customs must be given prior importance. • Climatic conditions must also be taken into consideration. Design elements introduced must not cause an issue on the long run of the residence. • Proper spaces must be provided according to the income group, and the occupation of the people for whom the design is intended • If new materials are being introduced, proper awareness must be given to the locals before implementing.
  13. 13. Thank you! Barakat, Sultan, 2013, On Site Review Report : Post Tsunami Housing, http://archnet.org/system/publications/contents/8733/original/DTP101232.pdf?1391611331 Archdaily – Post Tsunami Housing, Shigeru Ban

×