Sustainable Agriculture Presentation

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A brief introduction to sustainable agriculture.

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  • Faster, fatter, bigger cheaper
  • The Earth’s ecosystems – 60% of the Earth’s ecosystem services have been degraded in the past 50 years• The supply of energy and material resources needed for industrial growth – Natural resource consumption is expected to rise to 170% of the Earth’s bio-capacity by 2040
  • In recent decades, sustainable farmers and researchers around the world have responded to the extractive industrial model with ecology-based approaches, variously called natural, organic, low-input, alternative, regenerative, holistic, Biodynamic, biointensive, and biological farming systems. All of them, representing thousands of farms, have contributed to our understanding of what sustainable systems are, and each of them shares a vision of "farming with nature," an agro-ecology that promotes biodiversity, recycles plant nutrients, protects soil from erosion, conserves and protects water, uses minimum tillage, and integrates crop and livestock enterprises on the farm.
  • We need to connect sustainable production with sustainable consumption
  • Sustainable Agriculture Presentation

    1. 1. Working from the Ground Up<br />Sustainable Agriculture<br />Brianna Laderbush<br />The Dietetic Internship Program at Vanderbilt<br />May 3, 2010<br />
    2. 2. Roadmap<br />Agriculture and the Food System<br />Defining Sustainable<br />Exploring Sustainable Agriculture<br />Dietetics and Sustainability<br />
    3. 3. Objectives<br />What is sustainable agriculture?<br />What are the 3 legs of the sustainability stool?<br />Identify one way a dietetic professional can impact sustainable agriculture through practice.<br />Identify one way you can make a personal difference in the sustainability of our food system.<br />
    4. 4. Eat Right<br />Quantity<br />Quality<br />Responsibility<br />Health<br />2<br />
    5. 5. Agriculture and the Food System<br />
    6. 6. A Systems Perspective<br /><ul><li>Ecosystem
    7. 7. Interactions between energy, environment and living organisms
    8. 8. Agro-ecosystem
    9. 9. An ecosystem managed to produce food and fiber
    10. 10. Food system
    11. 11. A system that produces, processes, distributes and consumes food</li></ul>3<br />
    12. 12. Food Systems<br />Natural Resources<br />FOOD SYSTEM<br />Society<br />Technology<br />3<br />
    13. 13. Modern Agricultural Practices<br />Industrial Agriculture<br /><ul><li>Monoculture
    14. 14. Machinery
    15. 15. Biotechnology
    16. 16. Factory Farm
    17. 17. Vertical Integration</li></ul>2<br />
    18. 18. Driving Forces of Agriculture<br />Technology advancements<br />Product development<br />Food retail<br />Benefits<br /><ul><li>Increased production yields
    19. 19. Affordable food
    20. 20. Increased export markets
    21. 21. Strong agricultural industry
    22. 22. Convenience to the consumer</li></ul>6<br />
    23. 23. An Unsustainable Future<br /><ul><li>Conversion of farmland
    24. 24. Farming income
    25. 25. Productivity
    26. 26. Market competition</li></ul>Economics<br /><ul><li>Illegal Workers
    27. 27. Age of farm operators
    28. 28. External costs</li></ul>Social<br /><ul><li>Soil quality
    29. 29. Water
    30. 30. Genetic diversity</li></ul>Environment<br />6<br />
    31. 31. Learning from History<br />The decline of ancient civilizations in Mesopotamia, the Mediterranean region, <br />Pre-Columbian southwest United States, and Central America is believed to have been strongly influenced by natural resource degradation from <br />non-sustainable farming <br />and forestry practices.”<br />1<br />
    32. 32. Defining Sustainability<br />
    33. 33. Definition of Sustainability<br /><ul><li>Sustain:
    34. 34. From the Latin word sustinere
    35. 35. sus-, from below and tenere, to hold
    36. 36. To keep in existence or maintain
    37. 37. Implies long-term support or permanence</li></ul>What makes something sustainable?<br />4<br />
    38. 38. Characteristics of Sustainability<br />Economics<br />Subsidies<br />Income<br />Access<br />Environment<br />Conservation<br />Preservation<br />Animal Welfare<br />Community<br />Social justice<br />Cooperative relationships<br />3,5<br />
    39. 39. Exploring Sustainable Agriculture<br />
    40. 40. 1990 Farm Bill Public Law 101-624, Title XVI, Subtitle A, Section 1683<br />An integrated system of plant and animal production practices having a site-specific application that will over the long term:<br /><ul><li>Satisfy human food needs
    41. 41. Enhance environmental quality
    42. 42. Make the most of non-renewable energy sources
    43. 43. Sustain economic viability of farming operations
    44. 44. Enhance quality of life </li></ul>7<br />
    45. 45. Sustainable Agriculture is Multifunctional<br /><ul><li>Productionof food and fiber
    46. 46. Protectionof the environment
    47. 47. Conservationof land and resources
    48. 48. Developmentof rural communities
    49. 49. Maintenance of agricultural heritage</li></ul>4,6<br />
    50. 50. Types of Sustainable Farming<br /><ul><li>Organic farming
    51. 51. Defined by practices
    52. 52. Biodynamic
    53. 53. Permaculture
    54. 54. Agro-ecological Systems
    55. 55. Low-input</li></ul>Eatons Creek Organics, Inc.<br />4<br />
    56. 56. Sustainable Practices<br /><ul><li>Conserve soil
    57. 57. Cover crops
    58. 58. Minimize tillage
    59. 59. Crop rotation
    60. 60. Recycle nutrients
    61. 61. Compost
    62. 62. Manure
    63. 63. Crop residues</li></ul>3,8<br />
    64. 64. Dietetics and Sustainability<br />
    65. 65. American Dietetic Association<br />POSITION STATEMENT<br />“It is the position of the American Dietetic Association to encourage environmentally responsible practices that conserve natural resources, minimize the quantity of waste generated, and support the ecological sustainability of the food system – the process of food production, transformation, distribution, access and consumption.”<br />9<br />
    66. 66. Actions in Dietetic Practice<br />Registered dietitians can encourage:<br /><ul><li>Dietary variety
    67. 67. Foods produced with fewer inputs
    68. 68. Consumption of locally produced foods
    69. 69. Alternative protein sources
    70. 70. Economic food purchasing</li></ul>9,10<br />
    71. 71. Be Informed & Get Involved<br /><ul><li>Community
    72. 72. Farm-to-School Programs
    73. 73. Local Government
    74. 74. Access to locally produced foods
    75. 75. National Government
    76. 76. USDA Farm Bill</li></ul>10,11,12,13<br />
    77. 77. Subcommittee on Hunger, Nutrition and Family Farms<br />Food assistance and hunger prevention<br />School and child nutrition programs<br />Local and healthy food initiatives<br />Pesticides<br />General legislation<br />14<br />
    78. 78. Summary<br />Current agricultural practices are unsustainable<br />Sustainable agriculture supports local economies, communities and the environment<br />RD’s can promote healthier diets for both the person and the planet<br />Get involved!<br />
    79. 79. Objectives<br />What is sustainable agriculture?<br />What are the 3 legs of the sustainability stool?<br />Identify one way a dietetic professional can impact sustainable agriculture through practice.<br />Identify one way you can make a personal difference in the sustainability of our food system.<br />
    80. 80. QUESTIONS?<br />

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