Assessing and teaching skill-sets for autistic adults EDUC-7102-2/EDUC-8842-2 Principles of Distance Education   David J. ...
Introduction <ul><li>Some adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder, especially those with high-functioning autism or Asperger ...
Introduction <ul><li>Many other adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder are capable of employment in sheltered workshops unde...
Literature, Research and References <ul><li>Annotated Bibliographies </li></ul><ul><li>  Allen, K., Anderson, M., Bowen, S...
Annotated Bibliographies <ul><li>Meyen, E., Lian, C. and Tangen, P. (1998).  Issues associated with the design and  delive...
Issues associated with the design and  delivery of On-line instruction <ul><li>The focus of this article is on the issues ...
Annotated Bibliographies <ul><li>Allen, K., Anderson, M., Bowen, S., Burke, R.  & Howard, M. (2010). Evaluation of  two in...
Evaluation of two instruction methods to increase employment options for young adults with autism spectrum disorders. <ul>...
Annotated Bibliographies <ul><li>Allen, K., Wallace, D., Renes, D., Bowen, S.,  & Burke, V. (2010). Use of video  modeling...
Use of video modeling to teach vocational skills to adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorders. <ul><li>U...
Annotated Bibliographies <ul><li>Corbett, B.A. (2003). Video Modeling: A  Window into the World of Autism.  The  Behavior ...
Video Modeling: A  Window into the World of Autism. <ul><li>Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder may have to cope with c...
Annotated Bibliographies <ul><li>Hastings, R., Nash, S., Toogood, S., and  Totsika, V. Interactive training for active  su...
Interactive training for active support: perspectives from staff. <ul><li>This study described the experience of participa...
Annotated Bibliographies <ul><li>Wood, L. (1994). Computer technology and  autism.  LINK autism-europe  English Edition Nr...
Computer technology and autism. <ul><li>Wood (1994) suggested that, while a general understanding of autism is vital, know...
Graphics, video and presenter notes <ul><li>To be determined.  </li></ul>
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Principles of distance education storyboard module 2

  1. 1. Assessing and teaching skill-sets for autistic adults EDUC-7102-2/EDUC-8842-2 Principles of Distance Education David J. Miller Fall 2011
  2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>Some adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder, especially those with high-functioning autism or Asperger syndrome are able to work successfully in mainstream jobs. However, communication and social problems often cause difficulties in many areas of life. The individuals will continue to need encouragement and moral support in their struggle for an independent life. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Introduction <ul><li>Many other adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder are capable of employment in sheltered workshops under the supervision of managers trained in working with persons with disabilities. A nurturing environment at home, at school, and later in job training and at work, helps persons with ASD continue to learn and to develop throughout their lives. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Literature, Research and References <ul><li>Annotated Bibliographies </li></ul><ul><li> Allen, K., Anderson, M., Bowen, S., Burke, R. & Howard, M. (2010). Evaluation of two instruction methods to increase employment options for young adults with autism spectrum disorders. Research in Developmental Disabilities 31 (2010) 1223–1233. </li></ul><ul><li> Allen, K., Wallace, D., Renes, D., Bowen, S., & Burke, V. (2010). Use of video modeling to teach vocational skills to adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorders. Education and Treatment of Children, Vol. 33, No. 3, 2010, Pages 339–349. </li></ul><ul><li> Corbett, B.A. (2003). Video Modeling: A Window into the World of Autism. The Behavior Analyst Today: Volume 4, Issue No. 3. </li></ul><ul><li> Hastings, R., Nash, S., Toogood, S., and Totsika, V. Interactive training for active support: perspectives from staff. Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability, September 2008; 33(3): 225–238. Taylor and Francis, Ltd. </li></ul><ul><li> Meyen, E., Lian, C. and Tangen, P. (1998). Issues associated with the design and delivery of On-line instruction. Focus on Autism and other Developmental Disabilities, Volume 13, Number 1, Spring 1998, pages 53-60. </li></ul><ul><li> Wood, L. (1994). Computer technology and autism. LINK autism-europe English Edition Nr. 15 Quarterly - 4 th quarter 1994. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Annotated Bibliographies <ul><li>Meyen, E., Lian, C. and Tangen, P. (1998). Issues associated with the design and delivery of On-line instruction. Focus on Autism and other Developmental Disabilities, Volume 13, Number 1, Spring 1998, pages 53-60. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Issues associated with the design and delivery of On-line instruction <ul><li>The focus of this article is on the issues and policy concerns that are emerging as K-12 schools and postsecondary institutions place instruction online. Advancements in technology have made possible the delivery of instruction via the Internet. This has resulted in a number of issues surfacing as barriers and created the need for policies towards learning dynamics for autistics and developmentally delayed students. These concerns have been made even more complicated by the lack of standards to guide those engaged in instructional development. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Annotated Bibliographies <ul><li>Allen, K., Anderson, M., Bowen, S., Burke, R. & Howard, M. (2010). Evaluation of two instruction methods to increase employment options for young adults with autism spectrum disorders. Research in Developmental Disabilities 31 (2010) 1223–1233. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Evaluation of two instruction methods to increase employment options for young adults with autism spectrum disorders. <ul><li>The efficacy of a vocational training program including behavioral skills training, and a “performance cue system” was evaluated by these authors to teach targeted social-vocational skills to six young adults with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. In two separate studies, participants were employed to assist in the delivery of a fire safety education program. A single case, multiple-baseline design across subjects was used to evaluate efficacy of each varying educational technology process and intervention. </li></ul><ul><li>Results indicated that 5 of 6 participants reached criterion only after introduction of a video cue system while the sixth reached criterion with behavioral skills training alone. The program received high satisfaction ratings from participants, their parents, and consumers. Implications and potential use of the Performance Cue System technology in other employment settings were also discussed. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Annotated Bibliographies <ul><li>Allen, K., Wallace, D., Renes, D., Bowen, S., & Burke, V. (2010). Use of video modeling to teach vocational skills to adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorders. Education and Treatment of Children, Vol. 33, No. 3, 2010, Pages 339–349. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Use of video modeling to teach vocational skills to adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorders. <ul><li>Use of video modeling to teach vocational skills to adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorders” (2010) investigated the use of video modeling for initial acquisition of selected vocational skills by adolescents and young adults with ASD as well as evaluated the feasibility of young adults with ASD tolerating wearing a WalkAround costume while performing for short periods of time in a retail setting. The social validity was also investigated by examining the acceptability of this job to a small sample of young adults with ASD. </li></ul><ul><li>The results of this research study extended the referenced literature by demonstrating that video modeling was an effective way to teach adolescents and young adults with ASDs to perform a vocational task in a social setting. The study also reiterated the literature by demonstrating the benefits of video modeling without other intervention modalities such as prompting or arbitrary reinforcement components. Even though a mascot job is unlikely to provide full time employment opportunities, this type of job might provide realistic part time opportunities for some individuals. There is wide agreement that being employed has beneficial mental health effects and that having a job provides structure to the day, gives a sense of purpose, and fosters networks of social interaction. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Annotated Bibliographies <ul><li>Corbett, B.A. (2003). Video Modeling: A Window into the World of Autism. The Behavior Analyst Today: Volume 4, Issue No. 3. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Video Modeling: A Window into the World of Autism. <ul><li>Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder may have to cope with considerable deficits in social and communication skills and a tendency to exhibit inappropriate behaviors in social situations. Social Skill Builder computer software is built on the principle that children, particularly those with ASD, learn social skills best through video modeling--observing appropriate behaviors on a monitor and, through repetition, learning to model those behaviors in day-to-day, real-life situations. </li></ul><ul><li>The science behind the effectiveness of video modeling is strong. In numerous studies, comprising decades of scientific research, video modeling has been shown to be the most effective method for teaching social skills and target behaviors to children with autism. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Annotated Bibliographies <ul><li>Hastings, R., Nash, S., Toogood, S., and Totsika, V. Interactive training for active support: perspectives from staff. Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability, September 2008; 33(3): 225– 238. Taylor and Francis, Ltd. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Interactive training for active support: perspectives from staff. <ul><li>This study described the experience of participating in interactive training (IT) for active support (AS). Staff (N = 58) working with adults with an intellectual disability (ID) received IT on providing effective assistance for participation in daily activities. </li></ul><ul><li>The method incorporated semi-structured interviews conducted with staff (N = 37) on their experience of IT, the way it affected their work, and their views on the implementation of AS. </li></ul><ul><li>Results : High levels of satisfaction with IT were reported. Most staff identified at least one skill learnt during IT that they were still using 8 months later. No clear and consistent picture of AS implementation emerged across the service; staff identified a number of barriers, with lack of managerial support as the most significant. </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion: Interactive training can directly affect staff behaviour and has the advantage of being positively perceived by staff. However IT alone cannot ensure successful AS implementation, which is affected by a number of other factors, such as managerial support and input, residents' challenging behaviors, and staffing levels. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Annotated Bibliographies <ul><li>Wood, L. (1994). Computer technology and autism. LINK autism-europe English Edition Nr. 15 Quarterly - 4 th quarter 1994. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Computer technology and autism. <ul><li>Wood (1994) suggested that, while a general understanding of autism is vital, knowledge and understanding of the person also involves understanding of his/her skills, abilities and learning difficulties. The Assessment of the autistic person's possibilities calls for accurate evaluation of several fields of development. </li></ul><ul><li>Scales which are suitable for a multi dimensional assessment of the person's abilities within a developmental perspective, such as the PEP-R (Schopler) or the LPAD (Feuerstein), enable skills to be assessed and emerging abilities to be highlighted, with this forming the basis for progress by the autistic person. </li></ul><ul><li>In the case of autism, assessment of the social skills, in addition to his/her cognitive abilities, informs us of the areas which ought primarily to be developed to promote better social integration. In this respect, computer technology can above all provide indirect assistance with assessment, both from the point of view of data collection and analysis as that of the development of new forms of assessment, made possible by the interactive aspect of computer technology, as well as by the possibilities provided for training/guidance and sound and image combination (Multimedia technology). </li></ul>
  17. 17. Graphics, video and presenter notes <ul><li>To be determined. </li></ul>

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