Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Planning Study  Lower 9th Ward Art, Culture, and Civic Engagement Center                                           New Orl...
Lafayette College Team                        Faculty                  David Veshosky                        Ed Kerns     ...
contents4	Introduction6	  Programmatic Considerations15	 Economic and	   Financial Considerations20	   Appendix A	     Mis...
i. introduction
Planning Study 2010 			                                              L9W | 5T      he vision for the Lower 9th Ward Art, C...
ii. programmaticconsiderations
Planning Study 2010 			                                       L9W | 7C       onsistent with the fundamental EEGLP        p...
8 | L9W 					                                       Planning Study 2010                                                   ...
Planning Study 2010 			                                              L9W | 9Project Phasing:Depending on the availability ...
10 | L9W 					Planning Study 2010                                                                                         ...
Planning Study 2010 			   L9W | 11                               Building Uses:                                  Banquet H...
12 | L9W 					Planning Study 2010                                                                Theater                  ...
Planning Study 2010 			   L9W | 13                                                 Gift Shop                              ...
14 | L9W 					Planning Study 2010                                                                Artist-in-Residence      ...
iii. economic andfinancial considerations
16 | L9W 					Planning Study 2010 E      conomic impact analysis seeks to ascertain short-run net        changes in econom...
Planning Study 2010 			                                                                    L9W | 17               Table 1 ...
18 | L9W 					Planning Study 2010                                            Table 3: Economic Impact Analysis Results by ...
Planning Study 2010 			                                                               L9W | 19 As documented in Table 5, t...
appendix A                                                          mission statementVISION                               ...
appendix B                                       Figure 1conceptual plans   Conceptual Ground Floor plan AutoCAD
Figure 2Conceptual Main Floor plan AutoCAD
Figure 3Conceptual Top Floor plan AutoCAD
Figure 4Conceptual Site plan AutoCAD
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Lower 9th Ward: Art, Culture Community Engagement Center

530 views

Published on

Planning Study

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Lower 9th Ward: Art, Culture Community Engagement Center

  1. 1. Planning Study Lower 9th Ward Art, Culture, and Civic Engagement Center New Orleans, LAEconomic Empowerment and Global Learning Project (EEGLP) Lafayette College Easton, Pennsylvania
  2. 2. Lafayette College Team Faculty David Veshosky Ed Kerns Anuradha Ghai Jim Toia Ute Schumacher Gladstone Fluney Hutchinson Students Donald A. Ellis Mitchell Bennett Lewis Hunt-Irving Melanie DeFazio Nan Li Katrina Ladd Ting Chiu Imogen Cain Margaret Bruno-Metzger Ashutosh Tamrakar
  3. 3. contents4 Introduction6 Programmatic Considerations15 Economic and Financial Considerations20 Appendix A Mission Statement21 Appendix B Proposed Conceptual Plan
  4. 4. i. introduction
  5. 5. Planning Study 2010 L9W | 5T he vision for the Lower 9th Ward Art, Culture, and Civic Engagement Center is to bring together “residents, non-profits, community organizations,and local businesses and entrepreneurs who share acommitment to developing the cultural and creative to convert the former McDonogh 19/Louis Armstrong school at 5909 St. Claude Avenue into the Lower 9th Ward Center for Art, Culture, and Civic Engagement. The school, which includes the main school building, a cafeteria annex and a caretaker’s cottage, along with for locating program spaces within the school, based on the results of the charrette. Appendix B presents the proposed conceptual plan, as detailed in a site plan and floor plans.assets of the Lower 9th Ward in an environment of approximately 1.3 acres of open space bordered by St. Appendix B also presents a cost estimate for the proposedcivic inclusiveness and engagement as a platform for Claude Avenue and Alabo, Marais and Gordon streets, conceptual plan. Repair costs are based on estimatesthe economic recovery and development, and the has been vacant since Hurricane Katrina. of the Orleans Parish School Board, adjusted to 2010.democratic renewal, of the communities of the Lower Improvement costs include facilities and equipment9th Ward.” The mission of the center is to “support Based on the vision and mission of the Lower 9th Ward required to support proposed programs, as describedcommunity engagement and revitalization of the Lower Center for Art, Culture, and Civic Engagement and in the following section. Project costs are estimated to9th Ward through utilization of its art and cultural discussions with Lower 9th Ward residents, including be approximately $13 million to $16 million, includingassets as resources to achieve economic development, a design charrette in June, 2010, the project team has design and construction management (CM) costs. Givensustainability and the renewal of democratic practices developed an inventory of programs which could be the conceptual nature of the proposed plans, the costwithin the neighborhood.” (Appendix A) included in the center, and has determined the space and estimate includes a 25 percent contingency factor. functional requirements for such programs. ProgramStudents and faculty from Lafayette College’s Economic spaces proposed for the center are inventoried inEmpowerment and Global Learning Project (EEGLP) have Appendix B.been working with a group of Lower 9th Ward residentsto implement this vision and mission by developing plans The project team has also developed a conceptual plan
  6. 6. ii. programmaticconsiderations
  7. 7. Planning Study 2010 L9W | 7C onsistent with the fundamental EEGLP principal of supporting rather than directing community efforts, design considerationswere based on programs intended to support thevision and mission of the Lower 9th Ward Centerfor Art, Culture, and Civic Engagement. TheEEGLP project team has attempted to incorporateprogrammatic considerations in the proposed plan.Art has been considered in a broad sense, includingboth visual and performing arts. Spaces includedin the plan to support programs in the visual artsinclude a ceramics studio; a graphics/media, filmand printmaking studio; gallery space; and artists’studios. Spaces included in the plan to supportprograms in the performing arts include a theater;dance/theater studio; and a music classroom. Plansfor the center also include offices and meetingspaces for community arts organizations.Culture has been considered in an ecological sense, as the environment in which life flourishes. Conceptual modelsGeographically isolated, with a long tradition of of the McDonogh 19 building with the caretaker’s cottagecommunity and multi-generational family ties, theLower 9th Ward has a unique culture, even in the (Top) Rear Isometric Viewcontext of the unique culture of New Orleans. (Bottom) Front Isometric ViewCultural considerations addressed the impacts on theLower 9th Ward of Hurricanes Katrina and Betsy,segregation and integration, music, arts, and the re-population and development of the Lower 9th an artist-in-residence, including living and studioconnection of the community to nature, in terms of Ward. Spaces included in the plan to support civic space. Open spaces at the center will be used fora tradition of backyard gardens and the proximity of engagement include areas for exhibits about the a playground, picnic area, farmer’s market, andthe Mississippi River and Bayou Bienvenue. Spaces history of the Lower 9th Ward, classrooms, a media community garden.included in the plan to support cultural programs center/library, spaces for community meetings andinclude areas for exhibits about the Lower 9th Ward functions, and offices for community non-profit The entire site will be secured by fencing designedhistory and culture, spaces for community events organizations. to complement the buildings. Off-site parking willand functions, and offices and meeting spaces for be provided.community cultural organizations. Plans for the center also include a kitchen/culinary school, gift shop and café. Gallery and exhibitCivic engagement has been considered as a platform spaces can be used for receptions and banquets.for democratic renewal to support the sustainable The former caretaker’s cottage will be used for
  8. 8. 8 | L9W Planning Study 2010 From the Charrette: Computer generated models of the site, main building and individual floors were created and rendered using Autodesk Revit Architecture Software, and Google Sketch- up Software. Drawings and models are to scale and are accurate representations of the proposed programs and activities decided at the Charette. 1 Site (adjoining page)- Proposed green space at the back that can be used formultiple events, including the local Sankofa Market Place, as well as a children’s play area. Desired parking spaces are highlighted by the red spaces. Ground Floor (1)-Visual of a culinary art school (top), and a connected café and gift shop (top left) Main Floor (4)-Visual of a small scale 2 theater (bottom right), and gallery space (bottom) Top Floor(5)- Visual of rooms that will be transformed into art studios, artist studios, and offices 3
  9. 9. Planning Study 2010 L9W | 9Project Phasing:Depending on the availability of funds, it may be necessary or desirable toundertake the project in phases. While phasing would be determined by availableresources, it appears that phases could include:• Renovation of the caretaker’s cottage; this work could begin in Spring, 2011, and would be expected to take about three months and cost about $300,000;• Site work, including demolition of the cafeteria annex and paved areas, construction of a fence, and development of parking areas, green spaces, playground, etc.; this work would be expected to cost about $750,000; • Renovation of the bottom floor and building mechanical, electrical and plumbing (MEP) systems; this work would be expected to cost about $6 million; and • Renovation of the main and top floors; this work would be expected to cost about $4, divided approximately evenly between the two floors.
  10. 10. 10 | L9W Planning Study 2010 Table 2. Cost Estimate Repair costs are based on estimates of the Orleans Parish School Board. Table 1. Improvement costs are based on facilities and equipment for proposed Program Spaces programs and these costs are based on typical RS Means cost estimating methods. Cost estimates are directly derived from RS Means Commercial The following are estimated minimum square footage: Data Item Item cost Site repairs $370,000 Site improvments $340,000 Site work sub-total $710,000 Cottage repairs $250,000 Cottage improvements $30,000 Cottage work sub-total $280,000 Main building repairs $9,000,000 Main building improvements $750,000 Main building work sub-total $9,750,000 Sub-total $10,740,000 Design and construction management at 20% $2,148,000 Sub-total $12,888,000 Contingencies at 25% $3,222,000 Total $16,110,000
  11. 11. Planning Study 2010 L9W | 11 Building Uses: Banquet Hall Location: Galleries/Permanent Exhibit Space Banquet hall will attend to the civic engagement needs of the center. It will be a flexible entity that can be located either in a gallery space, open space on the ground floor, or on the green space at the back of the center. Conference Room Location: Top Floor This room will be used for conferences and meetings of non-profit organizations, the Sankofa Market board and citizens of the community. Administrative Offices Location: Top Floor and Main Floor Office space does not have to be separate rooms but could simply be a large room that makes use of cubicles to create personal deskspace. If walls are needed, an operable/movable wall system should be utilized. Movable walls are known as drywall replacement systems because these walls take on the role of a drywall, without the cost of putting up a drywall. Tracks for the walls will be installedin the ceilings and floors, but this is not costly. Carpet is also suggested for office space. See Figure 1 (Appendix B) for the floor plan.
  12. 12. 12 | L9W Planning Study 2010 Theater Location: Main Floor Café Square Footage: 1,420 SF Location: Ground Floor This area will be used as a multi-use area for theatrical Square Footage: 717 SF performances and for artists’ displays. Additional space The Café will serve the public and visitors simple in the Banquet hall could also be utilized for larger refreshments and finger foods. The Café in the basement audiences. will be supported by a kitchen that will also be located on the ground floor to store and prepare food. The Café will have outside seating that will be located at the side of the building. The Café must also abide by the FDA codes and requirements, as well as the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) design standards regarding dimensions and facilities. Gallery Space Location: Main Floor Square Footage: 1,579 SF Gallery Space will be used for display purposes. See Figure 1 and 4 (Appendix B).
  13. 13. Planning Study 2010 L9W | 13 Gift Shop Location: Ground Floor The gift shop should be located toward the front of the building to attract customers. See Figures 1 and 4. Perfoming Art Studios Location: Ground Floor Square Footage: Varies The performance art studios are a necessity to the Center. The culture unique to the Lower 9th Wardcombines music, food and dance and is a backbone of the community. These aspects and signature qualities typify the Lower 9th Ward. Visual Art Studios Location: Top Floor (2,184 SF) and Ground Floor (1,720 SF) The visual art studios will be utilized by artists in residence and students of the Center. Welcome Booth/Tourism Information Center Location: Main FloorThe Tourist Information Center will be to the main floor front entrance. To conserve space, it could be placed at the administrative offices on the ground floor and thus serve a dual purpose.
  14. 14. 14 | L9W Planning Study 2010 Artist-in-Residence Location: Former caretaker’s cottage. Sankofa MarketPlace Location: Green Area A market place that utilizes the green spaces on the site to produce and sell food. Permanent Exhibit Sapce Location: Main Floor, and hallways Permanent Exhibits will consist of historical and cultural artifacts of the Lower 9th Ward. It will be located in areas of high traffic such as the halls and the media center. Youth Guild Program Location: Main floor The youth guild program will utilize the physical spaces of the building but will be solely for the development and nourishment of the youth and young adults of the community. It will make use of an office space on the main floor and facilities throughout the building. Media Center Location: Main Floor The Media Center will be used to enrich the community, as it will provide literature and computer access. This can be literature about sustainability, or by local writers, or about the history of the Lower 9th Ward. Artist Studios Location: Top Floor Square Footage: 400-600/Studio This will be an extension of the visual artist’s residency program, and will attract competition among local artists. The studios will be rented out at monthly intervals to artists, but artists must perform at an acceptable level in order to keep their privilege of using the studio.
  15. 15. iii. economic andfinancial considerations
  16. 16. 16 | L9W Planning Study 2010 E conomic impact analysis seeks to ascertain short-run net changes in economic activities in the form of revenue, income and employment that are associated with additional spending in a region. To evaluate the economic feasibility of this project and assess its overall effect, an economic The economic impact study signals to the communities that when they support the arts, they not only enhance the quality of community life but also invest in their own economic wellbeing.2 impact analysis was conducted using the computer program This analysis assesses the economic impact of the Center IMPLAN1. The program captures the interdependencies of on the city of New Orleans as lack of social and economic various economic sectors and provides detailed analysis of infrastructure creates significant leakages of money spent how the local economy responds to the Lower 9th Ward Art, outside the Lower 9th Ward, where the Center is physically Culture, and Civic Engagement Center. located. Due to data availability, the present study uses findings by the Americans for the Arts: Arts & Economic Prosperity In the model, economic impact is measured in three III: The Economic Impact of Nonprofit Arts and Culture dimensions: direct, indirect and induced economic effects. The Organizations, Northwest Louisiana Regional Report (2007) as conversion of the McDonogh 19 building into an art, culture direct expenditure estimates for the economic impact analysis, and civic engagement center would create direct economic excluding cost of event admission (Table 1, Average $ spent effects or expenditures directly related to the project, namely per visitor column). Despite obvious geographic differences, spending on the construction of the building, subsequent Shreveport, where the NWLA report was conducted, is maintenance and utility expenses, wages paid to employees, comparable to New Orleans in various socioeconomic visitors’ expenditures such as complementary spending on dimensions3 and thus may be considered a suitable proxy meals, accommodation, as well as gifts purchased at other for New Orleans in terms of direct expenditure estimates. local establishments. Subsequent analysis assumes event admission charge of $6 per adult attendee4 and is conducted for two potential annual The Center would also generate indirect economic effects as attendee number scenarios: businesses experience an increase in demand for their output due to the new spending and in turn step up input purchases • The Center attracts a total of 7,500 adult attendees per year5 and hiring. What’s more, induced economic effects would • The Center attracts a total of 10,000 adult attendees per occur as a result of additional household expenditures induced year. by the rise in income generated by the new economic activity. Both business and household add to the local demand and It is acknowledged, however, that visitor spending at provide further economic stimulus and thus indirect and the Center may induce a substitution away from other induced effects are key to measuring spillover benefits to the larger community. 2 Arts & Economic Prosperity III: National and Northwest Louisiana Re- gional Report Hence, the establishment of the Lower 9th Ward Art, Culture, 3 According to U.S. Census Bureau 2008 statistics, the city of New Orleans and Civic Engagement Center would be expected to set in motion a chain reaction and generate multiple increases in has a total population of 270,245 compared to 200,425 in Shreveport; New economic activity in the city of New Orleans, whose total Orleans has a per capita income of $ 21,985 and Shreveport of $21,421; there effect can be expressed formally as: are 75,788 # occupied housing units in New Orleans, slightly below 77,692 in Shreveport. Total Impact = Direct effect + Indirect effect + Induced effect 4 The median admissions charge over a sample of similar themed centers in = Direct Effect x Multiplier New Orleans. 5 New Orleans Convention & Visitors Bureau data shows that in year 2009, 7.5 million visitors traveled to New Orleans, which yields an estimate of 7500 1 IMPLAN Professional Version 2.0, Social Accounting and Impact Analysis annual attendees, or 20 per day, if the Center were to attract one in every Software developed by the Minnesota Implan Group, Inc. thousand visitors to the city.
  17. 17. Planning Study 2010 L9W | 17 Table 1 : Direct Visitor Spending on Admission & Event-related Activities Average $ spent per per 7500 per 10000 Table 2: Economic Impact Analysis Results Summary attendee attendees attendees 5% substitution effect 10% substitution effectRefreshments during event 1.77 13,275 17,700Meals before/after event 9.14 68,550 91,400 7,500 10,000 7,500 10,000 Direct spending impact (ticket revenue) 45,000 60,000 45,000 60,000Souvenirs and gifts 1.77 13,275 17,700 Event-related direct spending impact 152,325 203,100 152,325 203,100Clothing/accessories 0.99 7,425 9,900 Competing Art & Culture Center substitution effect -9,866.50 -13,155 -19,732.50 -26,310Transportation 2.49 18,675 24,900 Direct spending impact (net of substitution) 187,458.5 249,945 177,592.5 236,790Event-related child care 0.05 375 500 Indirect & induced impact (from IMPLAN) 67,735.50 90,314 64,170.50 85,561Overnight lodging (1 night) 2.68 20,100 26,800 TOTAL OUTPUT IMPACT 255,194 340,259 241763 322351Other 1.42 10,650 14,200 Labor income 78,338 104,451 74,215 98,953Subtotal event-related spending 20.31 152,325 203,100 Employment 2.4 3.2 2.3 3Ticket sales 6 45,000 60,000 Indirect business taxes 13,142 17,522 12,450 16,600TOTAL 26.31 197,325 263,100 OUTPUT MULTIPLIER 1.36 1.36 1.36 1.36Competing venues 10% substitution -2.631 -19,732.50 -26,310NET TOTAL (if 10%) 23.679 177,593 236,790Competing venues 5% substitution -1.32 -9,866.50 -13,155 of about 1.36 - As a result of indirect and induced effects,NET TOTAL (if 5%) 24.99 187,458.50 249,945 Table 1 represents the direct overall output produced in New Orleans is projected economic effects of the Center and to increase by about 36% above the ticket revenue andexisting art and cultural venues1. To account for this related spending in the economy. event-related visitor expenditures.possibility, the analysis incorporates a negative directeffect on competing businesses and institutions. Two The indirect and induced economic effects results are With 10,000 new visitors per year4, the Food Servicesscenarios are considered: summarized in table 2 and impact on each sector is and Drinking Places sector would be the largest potential detailed in table 3. direct beneficiary, producing over $80,000 in new output,• 90% of total direct expenditure (ticket revenue plus creating 1.2 new jobs and nearly $30,000 in labor income.event-related spending) represents net new direct The economic impact analysis suggests total output This is followed by the Museums, Historical Sites, Parksinjections; the remaining 10% represents substitution of produced in New Orleans would grow by over $340,000 sector, with $34, 000 new output and $20,000 laborspending on other attractions that would have occurred as a result of $60,000 in ticket revenue and an additional income. The above table details estimates for other sectorsin its absence; $200,000 in event-related direct spending (assuming 10, that would stand to reap benefits under the project and 000 visitors a year and a 5% substitution effect). Labor also displays results obtained under the 7500 visitors• 95% net new direct injections; 5% substitution2. income is estimated to increase by $100,000 with 3.2 new assumptions. jobs created, and indirect business taxes would rise by1 To the extent that $6 spent on an admission ticket at the L9W about $17,000. These figures imply an output multiplier3Center reduces visitor spending at the Contemporary Arts Center orAshé Cultural Arts Center, both in New Orleans, by the same amount, regional arts, culture and civic engagement experience, thus attractingit does not add to net new spending. more visitors to New Orleans and all related events. Hence, while the2 In reality, as there is little economic activity in the L9W currently, study models a negative substitution effect, the alternative possibility related direct spending impact)the level of actual substitution is likely immaterial, or much lower than should also be recognized. 4 Assuming a 5% substitution effect.is accounted for. It is also possible that the Center could strengthen the 3 Output multiplier= (total output impact)/ (ticket revenue+ event-
  18. 18. 18 | L9W Planning Study 2010 Table 3: Economic Impact Analysis Results by Sector 10,000 annual visitors 7500 annual visitors 5% substitution effect 10 % substitution effect 5% substitution effect 10 % substitution effect Industry Output Employment Labor Income Output Employment Labor Income Industry Output Employment Labor Income Output Employment Labor Income Food services and drinking places 60,459.00 0.90 22,490.00 57,277.00 0.90 21,306.00 Food services and drinking places 80,612.00 1.20 29,987.00 76,370.00 1.20 28,409.00 Museums- historical sites- parks 25,666.00 0.30 14,709.00 24,315.00 0.30 13,935.00 Museums- historical sites- parks 34,221.00 0.40 19,612.00 32,420.00 0.40 18,579.00 Hotels and motels 16,006.00 0.20 5,548.00 15,164.00 0.20 5,256.00 Hotels and motels 21,341.00 0.30 7,397.00 20,218.00 0.30 7,008.00 Transit and ground transportation 14,356.00 0.10 6,076.00 13,600.00 0.20 5,757.00 Transit and ground transportation 19,141.00 0.20 8,102.00 18,134.00 0.20 7,676.00 Retail Stores - Food and beverage 9,931.00 0.10 4,264.00 9,408.00 0.20 4,040.00 Retail Stores - Food and beverage 13,241.00 0.20 5,686.00 12,545.00 0.20 5,387.00 Retail Stores - Clothing and accessories 6,820.00 0.10 2,184.00 6,461.00 0.10 2,069.00 Retail Stores - Clothing and accessories 9,093.00 0.10 2,913.00 8,615.00 0.10 2,759.00 Other personal services 9,379.00 0.10 1,408.00 8,885.00 0.10 1,334.00 Other personal services 12,505.00 0.10 1,878.00 11,847.00 0.10 1,779.00 Retail Stores - General merchandise 4,609.00 0.10 2,025.00 4,366.00 0.10 1,918.00 Retail Stores - General merchandise 6,145.00 0.10 2,700.00 5,821.00 0.10 2,557.00 Real estate establishments 7,425.00 - 1,263.00 7,035.00 0.10 1,196.00 Real estate establishments 9,901.00 0.10 1,684.00 9,379.00 - 1,595.00 Wholesale trade businesses 2,821.00 - 1,077.00 2,672.00 0.10 1,020.00 Wholesale trade businesses 3,761.00 - 1,436.00 3,563.00 - 1,361.00 TOTAL 255,194.00 2.40 78,338.00 241,763.00 2.30 74,215.00 TOTAL 340,259.00 3.20 104,451.00 322,351.00 3.00 98,953.00 Of particular significance to the economic impact of this Orleanian cooking, and local youths earning a diploma In addition to the economic impact of event-related Project is the implementation of a culinary school, offering in the culinary profession. For the former, the school spendings, the establishment of a culinary school has the both short term New Orleans-style cooking lessons and offers all-day experiential cooking lessons for a one-time potential to generate an additional $80,000 per year in long term vocational training. The establishment of such a cost of $100 tentatively, whereas the latter pay a total revenue to the Center and bring in $108, 800 new annual school would not only provide a constant revenue stream tuition of $2,000 for a year-long, full experience, certified output to the city. In the long run, the school would for the Center, but would also address the pressing issues professional training session. achieve greater economic impact. As alumni of the school of food security and unemployment in the Lower 9th establish careers in the culinary profession, expanding Ward, and potentially mobilize repopulation by adding a Given the regional economic impact multiplier of 1.36, prestige and operations of the culinary school would stabilizing force in the community. the complete economic impact analysis of the culinary bring in larger direct, indirect and induced economic school is as shown in Table 4. benefits. Consider two groups of audiences that the school targets: out-of-town visitors taking one-time classes on New
  19. 19. Planning Study 2010 L9W | 19 As documented in Table 5, the culinary school has the development of New Orleans. $700 Thousands highest projected start-up cost at $1,000,000 as well as $600 highest projected operating deficit at $99,200. The painting Based on the projected total expenses $500 and drawing studio, ceramics studio, digital photography ($585,685) and revenues ($612,786), the $400 studio, and music studio operating expenses range from Center is estimated to generate a profit $300 $11,800 to $39,200 annually. The digital photography of $27,101 per year. The data suggests $200 studio is projected to have the lowest operating deficit at that, although the Center may profit an $11,200 deficit, followed by the ceramics studio with a from programming and ticket sales, $100 deficit of $18,243. It is important to note that according to outside grants and substantial funding $- Total Revenues: the analysis, the dance studio is the only source of positive sources will be essential to sustain a $(100) Projected Expenses: sustainable operations with projected profit of $149,575 positive cash flow. $(200) Net operating Profit or Deficit annually. Ticket and gift shop sales provide an additional $(300) source of revenue with potentially $14,000 in profit. In addition, the economic study estimates that if the Center were to The economic impact and financial analyses have shown attract 10,000 visitors per year with 5% the proposed L9W Art, Culture, and Civic Engagement substitution effect on competing venues, Center project to have potential to be financially viable it would produce approximately an from the stand point of covering its operating costs, and additional $340,000 in new local output, to become an important contributor to the economic and increase labor income by $104,000 by creating jobs Table 4: Culinary School Economic Impact Analysis in local industries. It would also Table 5. contribute an additional $17,000 Program-specific Operating Budget Analysis Tuition per Projected number Total revenue/year person/ of attendees/ Total sessions/ year (direct spending Total economic impact = 1.36*direct spending impact in indirect business taxes to local In short, the project has the potential to become an session session impact) government. important contributor to the economic development and As the local economy recovers repopulation of the Lower 9th Ward as well as noteworthyOne-day cooking class 10.00 120,000.00 163,200.00 100.00 120*Year- long vocational training 10.00 2.00 40,000.00 54,400.00 and redevelops over time, the spillover benefits to the city of New Orleans. 2,000.00 multiplier economic effects areTOTAL 160,000.00 217,600.00 estimated to increase accordingly.
  20. 20. appendix A mission statementVISION cultural assets as creating a unique cultural destination that would educational groups. be attractive to new residents and tourists alike. The Center • To brand the Lower 9th Ward as an art and culturalThe Lower 9th Ward Art, Culture, and Civic Engagement Center envisions this combination of theme and process serving as a destination by transforming the community assests into abrings together residents, non-profits, community organizations, platform for the recovery and renewal of the economy, and civic marketable product that captures the place identity inherentand local businesses and entrepreneurs who share a commitment and democratic life of the Lower 9th Ward. in the culture, people and life in the Lower 9th Ward.to developing the cultural and creative assets of the Lower 9th • To contribute to the community development andWard in an environment of civic inclusiveness and engagement MISSION economic sustainability of the Lower 9th Ward, and toas a platform for the economic recovery and development, and regional, national and international conversations on thethe democratic renewal, of the communities of the Lower 9th To support community engagement and revitalization of the role of culture, ethnicity, diversity, civic engagement andWard. The Center’s focus is the identification, development and Lower 9th Ward through utilization of its art and cultural assets inclusive democratic practices in civil society renewal andimplementation of initiatives and programs that are based on the as resources to achieve economic development, sustainability and modernization.unique cultural and creative assets of the Lower 9th Ward. These the renewal of democratic practices within the neighborhood. • To build the social and human capital of residents, therebyinclude, among other things, its rich oral and documentary history strengthening local institutions and furthering neighborhoodand cultural traditions, its celebrated people and works in the VALUES development in the Lower 9th Ward.creative and performing arts, its historical practices of inclusive • To develop partnerships with academic institutions andrepresentative democracy at the state, city and community levels, • Democratic principles of participation, dialogue, and organizations interested in participating in the mission ofand its history and culture of environmental stewardship through pluralism the Center.its ecological (sustainable fishing and crabbing in the Bayou • Community participation and inclusiveness • To build bridges among the arts, humanities, and designBienvenue, for example) and built environment practices (barge • Innovation and sustainability fields for the purpose of furthering the mission of the Center.wood homes with high ceilings for cooling and open floor for flood • Cultural diversity, social equity, leadership, and self- • To create a Center that is a model of an environmentallywater drainage, for example). These accomplishments have formed empowerment efficient retrofitted historic restoration.a cultural tradition and cultural history that connect the Lower • To create a space for community educational programs9th Ward and its citizens to citizens and communities around GOALS through which children and adolescents can learn fromthe world, and to universal principles and values of humanity, specialized art classes.environmental stewardship and civil society. The Center believes • To create an art, culture and civic life “town square” in • To support collaborative engagement between projectthat the recent crises have refocused the communities of the Lower the Lower 9th Ward where residents can create, display and partners to explore the development of the Center as a9th Ward on these universal principles and values as foundational perform their creative works, and engage visitors. framework of education and continued learning.in their recovery and renewal. It further sees the renewal of these • To create a space for teaching and learning, collaborationcommunities around these core themes and the development and democratic dialogue between residents, and betweenand commoditization of the communities’ artistic, creative and residents and visitors, including students and professional
  21. 21. appendix B Figure 1conceptual plans Conceptual Ground Floor plan AutoCAD
  22. 22. Figure 2Conceptual Main Floor plan AutoCAD
  23. 23. Figure 3Conceptual Top Floor plan AutoCAD
  24. 24. Figure 4Conceptual Site plan AutoCAD

×