UPA 2011

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My overview of the UPA International Conference which was June 22-24th in Atlanta, Georgia.

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UPA 2011

  1. 1. #UPA2011<br />Designing for Social Change<br />June 22-24<br />Andrew Wirtanen<br />@awirtanen<br />UX Specialist, Atlantic BT<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3. <ul><li>Keynote
  4. 4. Design
  5. 5. Business
  6. 6. Research Methods</li></li></ul><li>Keynote<br />
  7. 7. Paul Adams Facebook | @padday<br />What is the average number of strong ties a person has?<br />
  8. 8. 4<br />
  9. 9. Paul Adams Facebook | @padday<br />How many people do Facebook users directly communicate with per week?<br />
  10. 10. 4<br />(6 per month)<br />
  11. 11. Paul Adams Facebook | @padday<br />80% of phone calls are to the same 4 people.<br />
  12. 12. Paul Adams Facebook | @padday<br /><ul><li>Physiological limit of people we can keep up-to-date with: 150
  13. 13. Average number of Facebook friends: 130-170</li></li></ul><li>Paul Adams Facebook | @padday<br />The Web hasn't changed the fundamentals of social science.<br />
  14. 14. Paul Adams Facebook | @padday<br />The web is being rebuilt around people.<br />People live in networks.<br />Networks determine how people are influenced.<br />
  15. 15. Paul Adams Facebook | @padday<br />The web is being rebuilt around people.<br />photos<br />
  16. 16. Paul Adams Facebook | @padday<br />2. People live in networks.<br />Groups form around:<br /><ul><li>Life stage
  17. 17. Hobbies
  18. 18. Shared experiences</li></ul>On average, people have 4 groups.<br />
  19. 19. Paul Adams Facebook | @padday<br />3. Networks determine how people are influenced.<br />
  20. 20. Paul Adams Facebook | @padday<br />People look at the actions of others.<br />"People who sit next to heavier eaters eat more."<br />
  21. 21. Paul Adams Facebook | @padday <br />In the next 2-5 years entire business verticals will be disrupted by the social web.<br />
  22. 22. Design<br />
  23. 23. Alison Cox IBMInteractive<br />Designing Mobile Sites & Apps<br /><ul><li>Decide what kind of app you want to create.
  24. 24. WAP Wireless App Protocol
  25. 25. Hybrid App
  26. 26. Native App
  27. 27. MEAP Mobile Enterprise App Platform
  28. 28. Hold a "Visioning Workshop" with the team.
  29. 29. Identify Personas, Priorities, Tasks, and Business Drivers.
  30. 30. Don't assume developing same features/function as the site.</li></li></ul><li>Alison Cox IBM Interactive<br /><ul><li>Wireframes
  31. 31. Start with one platform.
  32. 32. Develop a baseline estimate for # of screens.
  33. 33. Articulate all assumptions & change requests.
  34. 34. Tools mentioned: Axure, iRise, Visio, Balsamiq
  35. 35. Design Implications
  36. 36. Will need more screens to accomplish same tasks as website.
  37. 37. Mobile devices have various resolutions.</li></li></ul><li>Alison Cox IBM Interactive<br /><ul><li>Mobile Design Tips:
  38. 38. Utilize all three modalities (visual, auditory, haptic).
  39. 39. Mental models may be influenced by pre-existing channels (e.g. website).
  40. 40. Design for task interruption.
  41. 41. Ensure consistency between platforms when possible (e.g. naming).
  42. 42. Understand differences between mobile platforms.
  43. 43. Space out buttons!</li></li></ul><li>Susan Weinschenk @thebrainlady<br />Neuro Web Design<br /><ul><li>Your brain receives ~40 million sensory inputs/second.
  44. 44. You are only consciously aware of ~40 of them.
  45. 45. All others are subconciously absorbed.</li></li></ul><li>Susan Weinschenk @thebrainlady<br />Three Parts of the Brain:<br /><ul><li>New Brain
  46. 46. Old Brain
  47. 47. "Will it kill me?" (Danger)
  48. 48. "Can I have sex with it?" (Sex)
  49. 49. "Can I eat it?" (Food)
  50. 50. Mid-Brain</li></li></ul><li>Susan Weinschenk @thebrainlady<br /><ul><li>Two tables with jams:
  51. 51. 6 jars
  52. 52. 24 jars
  53. 53. Which table had more purchases?
  54. 54. The Old Brain wants control and can override the New Brain's immediate desires.
  55. 55. Paradox: Options make us feel like we're in control, but too many can take the control away.</li></li></ul><li>Susan Weinschenk @thebrainlady<br /><ul><li>People are social (mid-brain).
  56. 56. Bystander Study Latane & Darley, 1968
  57. 57. When surrounded by other people, we look to others to see what we should do.
  58. 58. Other people's reviews matter more than experts. Chen, 2008
  59. 59. Reciprocity: When Christmas cards are sent to strangers, they send them back. Kunz & Walcott, 1976</li></li></ul><li>Susan Weinschenk @thebrainlady<br /><ul><li>Design Implications:
  60. 60. Limit choice, provide defaults.
  61. 61. Show reviews by friends.
  62. 62. Give information before the form.
  63. 63. People will fill out the form more frequently due to Reciprocity.
  64. 64. People will react to scarcity.
  65. 65. Stories are very powerful.
  66. 66. When using pictures, make sure faces are looking at you, or at the product.</li></li></ul><li>Sharron Rush Knowbility | @sharrush<br />Top 5 Accessibility Mistakes<br />Lack of good ALT text on images.<br />Poor structure/in-page navigation. Use semantic markup.<br />Lack of Keyboard Access.<br />No labels for form fields.<br />Insufficient contrast. Install an accessibility toolbar!<br />How to find users for user research:<br /><ul><li>Google group for blind computer users
  67. 67. Loop 11 remote database
  68. 68. WebAIM on LinkedIn</li></li></ul><li>Business<br />
  69. 69. Investing in User Research: Deciding what Research to Perform (panel)<br /><ul><li>Understand the client's goals.
  70. 70. What are you trying to answer?
  71. 71. What is going to be done with the results?
  72. 72. What will be most effective?
  73. 73. Look for research already completed by other teams.
  74. 74. Utilize consultants if necessary.</li></li></ul><li>Susan Dray @susandra<br />Getting resources to do more.<br /><ul><li>Focus on risk rather than ROI.
  75. 75. Make UX risks explicit in research proposals.
  76. 76. Demonstrate how to manage risks with research.
  77. 77. Prioritize challenges and make assumptions explicit.
  78. 78. What is risk if assumptions are wrong?
  79. 79. Be proactive.
  80. 80. Synthesize research & accumulate knowledge.
  81. 81. Anticipate research needs.
  82. 82. Work across organization to understand mindsets.</li></li></ul><li>Research Methods<br />
  83. 83. Can anyone learn to conduct usability testing? (panel)<br /><ul><li>Consensus:
  84. 84. Amateurs doing UT is ok, but leave nuclear power plant control panels to the professionals.
  85. 85. It takes a while to become a good moderator.
  86. 86. Amateurs doing UT should not cause problems because it should be a group process to determine what gets fixed.</li></li></ul><li>Jeff Sauro @MsrUsability<br /><ul><li>CUE studies show 20% agreement among UX reviewers.
  87. 87. 51% if reviewing the same users.
  88. 88. Agreement != Accuracy
  89. 89. 5 users are enough to find 85% of the problems, given a probablity of 31% of a user encountering a problem.
  90. 90. If problems are less obvious, you need more users.</li></li></ul><li>Karis & Virzi formerly of Verizon<br />Multiple research techniques are necessary. <br />UT can't work by itself.<br />4 Classes of Techniques:<br />How product is actually used. Web Analytics<br />How product is used in realistic context. Contextual Inquiry, Diary Studies, Ethnography<br />How user reacts. Usability Testing<br />How users feel. Surveys, Emails<br />
  91. 91. Karis & Virzi formerly of Verizon<br />Case Studies:<br /><ul><li>DSL Setup (Verizon)
  92. 92. Superpages.com</li></ul>Practical Advice:<br /><ul><li>Comparitive studies had more impact than any other research method.
  93. 93. "If you don't get email feedback on your site, you're crazy!"</li></li></ul><li>Rolf Molich DialogDesign, UK<br /><ul><li>Experienced usability professionals made fundamental mistakes in UT:
  94. 94. Scripts were leading.
  95. 95. Reports were hard to understand.
  96. 96. The moderator and notetaker didn't coordinate notes.
  97. 97. No or few positive findings.
  98. 98. Moderator spent excessive time on unneccesary instructions/small talk.</li></li></ul><li>Rolf Molich DialogDesign, UK<br /><ul><li>"Total Waste of Time" (TWOT)
  99. 99. Forms
  100. 100. Demographic Information
  101. 101. Instructions (e.g. Think Aloud)
  102. 102. We need to focus on quality.</li></li></ul><li>UPA2012.org<br />Leadership<br />June 5-8<br />

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