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Zebra Mussels<br />Jonathan C., Ettore F., Anthony T., Derick Y.<br />
A triangular shaped bivalve shell<br />Less than 1.5 inches<br />Sometimes alternating light/dark bands<br />Fibers that g...
The Zebra Mussel<br />Kingdom:		Animalia<br />Phylum:		Mollusca<br />Class:		Bivalvia<br />Subclass:		Heterodonta<br />Ord...
Zebra mussels originated in the parts of western Russia near the Caspian Sea and the Ural River<br />Now, the zebra mussel...
Using glue formed from byssal threads to strongly bond with any surface<br />Filtering 1L of water per day<br />Feeding on...
Coating the shells of other animals<br />Killing off other mussels through starvation<br />Eating all the phytoplankton<br...
When a zebra mussel attaches to a native mussel, the native mussel cannot perform any action, leading to the reduction of ...
“BW_Zebra Mussel.” 13 June 2011. 	<http://upload.wikimedia.org/>.<br />“Small Zebra Mussel Cluster.” Discover Magazine. 12...
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Zebra mussels

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Zebra mussels

  1. 1. Zebra Mussels<br />Jonathan C., Ettore F., Anthony T., Derick Y.<br />
  2. 2. A triangular shaped bivalve shell<br />Less than 1.5 inches<br />Sometimes alternating light/dark bands<br />Fibers that grow from the hinge<br />Similar to the quagga mussel<br />The Culprit<br />
  3. 3. The Zebra Mussel<br />Kingdom: Animalia<br />Phylum: Mollusca<br />Class: Bivalvia<br />Subclass: Heterodonta<br />Order: Veneroida<br />Family: Dreissenidae<br />Genus: Dreissena<br />Species: polymorpha<br />
  4. 4. Zebra mussels originated in the parts of western Russia near the Caspian Sea and the Ural River<br />Now, the zebra mussels infest most of Europe, the United States and Canada.<br />The Invasion<br />
  5. 5. Using glue formed from byssal threads to strongly bond with any surface<br />Filtering 1L of water per day<br />Feeding on phytoplankton and some small zooplankton<br />Traits<br />
  6. 6. Coating the shells of other animals<br />Killing off other mussels through starvation<br />Eating all the phytoplankton<br />Filtering the water to allow more sunlight and more aquatic plant growth<br />Bioaccumulation, storing the toxins to weaken predators<br />Blocking water intake systems<br />Damages<br />
  7. 7. When a zebra mussel attaches to a native mussel, the native mussel cannot perform any action, leading to the reduction of numbers.<br />Eating the phytoplankton removes a large portion of the bottom of the food chain; the effects are amplified.<br />Filtered water means more sunlight and increased plant growth, obstructing motors and entangling feet.<br />Blue-green algae flourish with lack of competition from the phytoplankton. Some algaes produce toxins.<br />Contamination builds up in the mussel, and when a predator eats enough of this contamination, it builds up, increasing with each trophic level.<br />Environmental Damage<br />
  8. 8. “BW_Zebra Mussel.” 13 June 2011. <http://upload.wikimedia.org/>.<br />“Small Zebra Mussel Cluster.” Discover Magazine. 12 Feb. 2011. 13 June 2011. <http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/>.<br />“Aquatic Invasive Species: Zebra Mussel.” Hydroblaster. Dec. 2005. 13 June 2011. <http://www.hydroblaster.com/>.<br />Works Cited<br />

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