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Shopping

  1. 1. INTRODUCTIONMalls in India are a relatively new format for retailing. While this format may have existed in theWestern economies for several decades, in India this phenomenon could be estimated to be onlyabout fifteen odd years old.One of the earliest large floor-area retailers in India, was "Shoppers Stop". However, the first ofthe current format of the malls was the Crossroads mall in Mumbai, which was established bythe Piramals in period around 2000-01. Crossroads then had the highest rent per sq. meter ofestablishment that the vendors had to bear. Due to the exorbitant rent, Crossroads initially had arough ride. Also, the mall format was new, and was a novelty for most Indian consumers. Thisled several visitors to the mall, but never converted to actual purchases, since most were visitingthe place out of curiosity.However, the situation had changed drastically now. Malls seem to be springing up acrossseveral cities in India. Notable among these is Gurgaon, a upcoming city near Delhi.Five Reasons why Indian Organized Retail is at the brink of Revolution: • Scalable and Profitable Retail Models are well established for most of the categories • Rapid Evolution of New-age Young Indian Consumers • Retail Space is no more a constraint for growth • Partnering among Brands, retailers, franchisees, investors and malls • India is on the radar of Global Retailers SuppliersLooking AheadMany strong regional and national players emerging across formats and product categories. Mostof these players are now geared to expand far more rapidly than the initial years of starting upMost have regained / improved profitability after going through their respective learning curves • A decade ago – not a single mall 1
  2. 2. • A year ago – less than half a dozen• Today – 70 malls• 2 years from now – 300 malls 2
  3. 3. LITERATURE REVIEWRetailing is the final step in the distribution of merchandise - the last link in the Supply Chain -connecting the bulk producers of commodities to the final consumers. Retailing covers diverseproducts such as foot apparels, consumer goods, financial services and leisure.A retailer, typically, is someone who does not effect any significant change in the product execsbreaking the bulk. He/ She are also the final stock point who makes products or servicesavailable to the consumer whenever require. Hence, the value proposition a retailer offers to aconsumer is easy availabilities of the desired product in the desired sizes at the desired times.In the developed countries, the retail industry has developed into a full-fledged industry wheremore than three-fourths of the total retail trade is done by the organized sector. Huge retailchains like Wal-Mart, Carr four Group, Sears, K-Mart, McDonalds, etc. have now replaced theindividual small stores. Large retail formats, with high quality ambiance and courteous, and well-trained sales staff are regular features of these retailers.Top Ten Retailers Worldwide Rank Retailer No of stores owned 1 Wall-Mart Stores Inc. 4178 (USA) 2 Carrefour Group (France) 8130 3 The Kroger Co. (USA) 3445 3
  4. 4. 4 The Home Depot, Inc. 1134 (USA) 5 Royal Ahold (Netherlands) 7150 6 Metro AG (Germany) 2169 7 Kmart Corporation (USA) 2105 8 Sears, Roebuck and Co. 2231 (USA) 9 Albertsons, Inc. (USA) 2512 10 Target Corporation (USA) 1307door-to-door solicitation and temporary displaying of merchandise (stalls). Broadly the organisedretail sector can be divided into two segments, In-Store Retailers, who operate fixed point-of-salelocations, located and designed to attract a high volume of walk-in customers, and the non-storeretailers, who reach out to the customers at their homes or offices.Apart from using the internet for communication (commonly called e-tailing), non-store retailersdid business by broadcasting of infomercials, broadcasting and publishing of direct-responseadvertising publishing of traditional and electronic catalogues,Major formats of In-Store Retailing have been listed in Table given below: Format Description The Value Proposition Branded Exclusive showrooms either Complete range available Stores owned or franchised out by a for a given brand, Certified manufacturer. product quality. Speciality Focus on a specific consumer Greater choice to the 4
  5. 5. Stores need, carry most of the brands consumer, comparison available. between brands possible Department Large stores having a wide One stop shop catering to Stores variety of products, organized varied consumer needs. into different departments, such as clothing, house wares, furniture, appliances, toys, etc. Supermarkets Extremely large self-services One stop shop catering to retail outlets. varied consumer needs. Discount Stores offering discounts on the Low prices. Stores retail price through selling high volumes and reaping the economies of scale. Hyper-mart Larger than a Supermarket, Low prices, vast choice sometimes with a warehouse available including services appearance, generally located as cafeterias. in quieter parts of the city Convenience Small self-service formats Convenient location and Stores located in crowded urban extended operating hours. areas. Shopping An enclosure having different Variety of shops available Malls formats of in-store retailers, all close to each other. under one roof.Retailing in India 5
  6. 6. The retail market size in India is estimated to be around $180 billion. Retailing provides jobs toalmost 15 percent of employable Indian adults and it is perhaps the largest contributor to IndiasGDP.But the flip side of the coin is that the average size of each of the retail outlets in India is only 50square feet and though a large employer, the industry is very unorganized, fragmented and with arural bias.Retail Industry in India • Even though India has well over 5 million retail outlets of all sizes and styles (or non- styles), the country sorely lacks anything that can resemble a retailing industry in the modern sense of the term. This presents international retailing specialists with a great opportunity. • Retailing in India is thoroughly unorganised. There is no supply chain management perspective. According to a survey by AT Kearney, an overwhelming proportion of the Rs. 400,000 crore retail markets are UNORGANISED. In fact, only a Rs. 20,000 crore segment of the market is organised. • As much as 96 per cent of the 5 million-plus outlets are smaller than 500 square feet in area. This means that India per capita retailing space is about 2 square feet (compared to 16 square feet in the United States). Indias per capita retailing space is thus the lowest in the world (source: KSA Technopak (I) Pvt Ltd, the India operation of the US-based Kurt Salmon Associates). 6
  7. 7. • Just over 8 per cent of Indias population is engaged in retailing (compared to 20 per cent in the United States). There is no data on this sectors contribution to the GDP.• From a size of only Rs.20,000 crore, the ORGANISED retail industry grew to Rs. 160,000 crore by 2011. The TOTAL retail market, however, as indicated above have grown 20 per cent annually from Rs. 400,000 crore in 2007 to Rs. 800,000 crore by 2011 (source: survey by AT Kearney)• Given the size, and the geographical, cultural and socio-economic diversity of India, there is no role model for Indian suppliers and retailers to adapt or expand in the Indian context.• The first challenge facing the organised retail industry in India is: competition from the unorganised sector. Traditional retailing has established in India for some centuries. It is a low cost structure, mostly owner-operated, has negligible real estate and labour costs and little or no taxes to pay. Consumer familiarity that runs from generation to generation is one big advantage for the traditional retailing sector.• In contrast, players in the organised sector have big expenses to meet, and yet have to keep prices low enough to be able to compete with the traditional sector. High costs for the organised sector arises from: higher labour costs, social security to employees, high quality real estate, much bigger premises, comfort facilities such as air-conditioning, back-up power supply, taxes etc. Organised retailing also has to cope with the middle class psychology that the bigger and brighter a sales outlet is, the more expensive it will be. 7
  8. 8. • The above should not be seen as a gloomy foreboding from global retail operators. International retail majors such as Benetton, Dairy Farm and Levis have already entered the market. Lifestyles in India are changing and the concept of "value for money" is picking up. • Indias first true shopping mall – complete with food courts, recreation facilities and large car parking space – was inaugurated as lately as in 1999 in Mumbai. (This mall is called "Crossroads"). • Local companies and local-foreign joint ventures are expected to more advantageously position than the purely foreign ones in the fledgling organised Indias retailing industry. • These drawbacks present opportunity to international and/or professionally managed Indian corporations to pioneer a modern retailing industry in India and benefit from it. • The prospects are very encouraging. The first steps towards sophisticated retailing are being taken, and "Crossroads" is the best example of this awakening. More such malls have been planned in the other big cities of India.The Indian retail industry is unorganizedThere are nearly twelve million retail outlets in India and the number is growing. Two thirds ofthese stores are in rural location. The vast majority of the twelve million stores are small "fatherand son" outlets. According to the "Retailing in India" report published by the PwC Global RetailIntelligence Program, share of the unorganized sector is 98%. 8
  9. 9. The Indian retail industry is fragmentedRetail stores in India are mostly small individually owned businesses. The average size of anoutlet is 50 s.q. ft. and though India has the highest number of retail outlets per capita in theworld, the retail space per capita at 2 s.q. ft per person is amongst the lowest in the world.The Indian retail industry has rural biasNearly two thirds of the stores are located in rural areas. The retail industry in rural India hastypically two forms: "Haats" and "melas". Haats are the weekly markets: they serve groups of10-50 villages and sell day-to-day necessities. They are frequently used as replenishment pointfor the small village retailer. Melas are larger in size and more sophisticated in terms of thegoods sold. Mela merchandise would include more complex manufactured products such astelevisions.Evolution of Indian Retail IndustryFor Indian retailing, things started to change slowly in the 1980s, when India first began openingits economy. Textiles sector (which companies like Bombay Dyeing, Raymonds, S Kumars andGrasim) was the first to see the emergence of retail chains. Later on, Titan, maker of premiumwatches, successfully created an organized retailing concept in India by establishing a series ofelegant showrooms.For long, these remained the only organized retailers, but the latter half of the 1990s saw a freshwave of entrants in the retailing business. This time around it was not the manufacturer looking 9
  10. 10. for an alternative sales channel. These were pure retailers with no serious plans of getting intomanufacturing. These entrants were in various fields, like - FoodWorld, Subhiksha and Nilgirisin food and FMCG; Planet M and Music World in music; Crossword and Fountainhead in books.As of the year ending 2011 the size of the Indian organized retail industry was estimated ataround Rs. 13,000 crore. The various segments that make up the organised retail industry alongwith their size are in table given below. Segment Market Size (Rs. Crore) Textiles and clothings 4050 Jewellery 2,000-2,500 Consumer Durables 1500 Footwear 1,300-7,500 Food and personal care 1000 Non-Store retail 900 Luggage, watches and tyre 500 Books and music 390Retailing Formats in IndiaSome of the prevalent relating formats in India include:MallsMost malls give floor space out to individual shops on lease, and these are enticed by theeconomies resulting from the sharing of costs. Indias largest shopping arcade Spencar Plaza 10
  11. 11. (600,000-sq-ft) in Chennai is an example. In malls like these, the combined brand pull of alloutlets is used to create a pull for the mall.Branded StoresExclusive showrooms run by premium brands have been the catalysts in pushing up the Indianretail scenario. This concept is now being used to introduce organized retailing to the secondrung towns. Madura Garments has started setting up exclusive outlets in cities like Trichy andThanjavur.Departmental StoresDepartmental Stores are expected to take over the apparel business from exclusive brandshowrooms. Among these, the biggest success is K Rahejas Shoppers Stop, which started inMumbai and now has more than seven large stores (over 30,000 sq. ft) across India and even hasits own in store brand for clothes called Stop!.Speciality StoresChains such as the Bangalore based Kids Kemp, the Mumbai books retailer Crossword, RPGsMusic World and the Times Groups music chain Planet M, are focusing on specific marketsegments and have established themselves strongly in their sectors.Absence of discounting as a dominant format of retailing in India is a glaring peculiarity. Thereasons are two-fold. Unlike most Western countries, Indian retailers have much less bargainingpower. They thrive as small store and dont have the clout to negotiate terms with themanufacturers. The other reason is that the retailers themselves have no economies of scale to 11
  12. 12. offer discounts on their own. However, the scenario is now changing. Increased investments andthe entry of big business houses in retailing is leading to the emergence of bigger retailers, whocan both bargain with the suppliers, as well as, reap economies of scale. Hence, discounting isbecoming an accepted practice.Trends in RetailingRetailing in India is at a nascent stage of is evolution, but within a small period of time certaintrends are clearly emerging which are in line with the global experiences. Organised retailing iswitnessing a wave of players entering the industry. These players are experimenting with variousretail formats. Yet, Indian retailing has still not been able to come up with many successfulformats that can be scaled up and applied across India. Some of the notable exceptions have beengarment retailers like Madura Garments & Raymonds who was scaled their exclusive showroomformat across the country.Experimentation with formatsRetailing in India is still evolving and the sector is witnessing a series of experiments across thecountry with new formats being tested out; the old ones tweaked around or just discarded. Someof these are listed in Table below. 12
  13. 13. Retailer Current New Formats. Experimenting With Format Shoppers Department Quasi-mall Stop Store Ebony Department Quasi-mall, smaller outlets, adding Store food retail Crossword Large Corner shops bookstore Piramyd Department Quasi-mall, food retail Store Pantaloon Own brand Hypermarket store Subhiksha Supermarket Considering moving to self service Vitan Supermarket Suburban discount store Foodworld Food Hypermarket, Foodworld express supermarket Globus Department Small fashion stores Store Bombay Aggregation of Kiranas Bazaar Efoodmart Aggregation of Kiranas Metro Cash and carry S Kumars Discount storeRetailers are also trying out smaller versions of their stores in an attempt to reach a maximumnumber of consumers. Crossword bookstores is experimenting with Crossword Corner, toincrease reach and business from their stores. FoodWorld is experimenting with a format of one-fourth the normal size called FoodWorld Express.Store design 13
  14. 14. Irrespective of the format, the biggest challenge for organised retailing is to create anenvironment that pulls in people and makes them spend more time shopping and also increasesthe amount of impulse shopping. Research across the world shows that the chances of sensesdictating sales are as much as 10-15% for certain categories. This reason is good enough fororganised retailers to bring in professional designers while developing a new property. And, thatis why retail chains like MusicWorld, Baristal, Piramyd and Globus and laying major emphasis& investing heavily in store design.MusicWorld spent three months in college campuses and metros studying the market and talkingto youngsters before starting work. The brand identity was created after extensive research: alogo was designed and the look of the stores across the country was decided upon. Apart fromthe visual impact, the functionality of the store design was also taken care of. Listening postshave been created for people to listen to their favorite album and an area in the center of thestores has been earmarked for celebrity visits and promotions.Emergence of discount storesWhat does Subhiksha In Chennai, Margin Free in Kerala and recent entrants like Bombay Bazaarin Mumbai, RPGs - Giant in Hyderabad, Big Bazaar in Kolkata, Hyedrabad and Bangalore havein common? Their products are below MRP.Discount stores have finally arrived in India and they are expected to spearhead the revolution inorganisation retailing. Though this segment is growing, it is small compared to internationalstandards where around 60 per cent of the business comes from this format. Internationally, thelargest retailer in the world Wal-Mart is a discounter. These discount stores have advantages of 14
  15. 15. price, assortment dominance and quality assurance and have the ability to quickly build scale andpass on the benefits. However, the success would be for retailers who are able to build the scalefast and manage their operations efficiently while offering value to the customer consistently.Unorganized retailing is getting organizedTo meet the challenges of organized retailing that is luring customers away from the unorganizedsector, the unorganized sector is getting organized. 25 stores in Delhi under the banner ofProvision mart are joining hands to combine monthly buying. Bombay Bazaar and Efoodmarthave also been formed which are aggregations of Kiranas.In a novel move, six Delhi based restaurants have come together and formed a consortium: NFC,to promote New Friends Colony, a posh locality in the Capital, as a branded place in town. Theaim is to increase footballs in the area, which is fast losing its sheen to its closest and upcomingdestinations such as large cineplexes, and malls, which are backed by the corporate house suchas Ansals and PVR.Not all stories are a successA lot of activity is happening in retail and though we do have may success stories, not allventures have been successful. Shoppers Stop, for example, implemented JD Edwards ERP, butcould not reap much bssenefit due to less than optimal number of operating locations. A fewreferences of other such less successful ventures is given below: 15
  16. 16.  Franchising, as a way to grow has not worked out well for Vitan, the second oldest food supermarket. More than two third of its 19 odds outlets have either folded up or snapped up ties with the parent.  The foray of organized retailing in the small towns of India has met with limited success. The notable example being Shoppers Stop foray in Jaipur. The retailers are now focusing their energies on the top six cities.  Indias oldest food supermarket chain, the Bangalore based Nigliris has been up for sale for a few months now but yet to find takers.  In Delhi, the Escorts group-promoted Nanz, a food supermarket has shut down after being unable to find a white knight.Source: Pwc AnalysisThese failures and limited successes have happened both due to a lack of experience andunderstanding of issues.Vision 2012The past 2-3 years have seen a number of development in the retailing business in India. The themarket. Bigger players like Shoppers Stop are in a position to take advantage of their sizes indealing with the manufacturers. Despite a slowdown in the economy, customer queues at thestores are not decreasing. Retail sector is bound to grow in the coming years. But how much andin what direction are the questions that need to be evaluated.entry of corporate houses like RPG,Tatas and Piramals have increased the capital availability in Various agencies have madedifferent estimates of the size of organized market in 2012. The one thing in common amongst 16
  17. 17. these estimates is that the Indian organized retailing industry will be very big in 2012. The statusof the industry will depend a lot on external factors like Government regulations and real estateprices, besides activities of the retailers and demands of the customers. Based on our analysis ofpresent trends, and development of retailing elsewhere, we present our perspectives andsnapshots of organized retailing, as it would exit in 2012.DemographicsIn the next 10 years, India population is expected to grow by about 14 per cent. But this increasewill not be even. Important trends tha will effect retailers are lised below.The number of children (0-15 years) will remain stable at 30 million: This will mean a lessergrowth for toys, games and some apparel segments.But given the current nascent stage of thegrowth, these sectors will still offer high grwoh rates.The number of people in 40-60 years of age will go up by 30%: Sales of cosmetics, skin care,hair dyes, and other youth inducing products will rise. More consumer resources would be spenton retirement planning and saving for retirement. Home improvement and financial servicesfirms would benefit from this trend.The number of households will increase by 25%: This would lead to a higher growth in thehousehold-decor items vis-a-vis personal items as apparel and fashion accessories.Regional differences will stay 17
  18. 18. Although a few player will be able to form pan-Indian retail supply chains, the retail market isunlikely to be a single entity. For example, food retailing in Chennai, Kolkata and Chandigarh isvastly different in terms of shopping habits and consumer tastes. Many such differences willremain.Though a few national retail chains will develp, they would have to coexist with strong regionalplayers, whow would excel in thir understanding of the customers and strong barnd names. Thenational players would primarily be is sectors like Apparel, Fashion, Food and Cmusic.Importance of local supplies for grocery sector would ensure the regional chains would reignsupreme in these sectors. The key to success for national players will to maintain the efficienciesthat come from their large-scale operations while retaining the ability and the flexibility to salisfydifferent needs of different consumers.However, organised retailing, in some cases, will change and harmonise consumer habits,purchasing patterns and consumer behavior. McDonalds and Barista have already beensuccessful in doing this.Today, internationally all top-retailers (except Kart and Aldi) operat 3-4different formats, withcompanies like Metro AG operating 13 formats. This diversity of formats allows the company toutilise its brand value across different segments and categories of customers.Signs of such a development are visible in India as well. A movement towards Class-I citiesnecessitates modification of operating format5s to suit different needs. By 2012, top retailerswould be operating at least 3-4 formats. 18
  19. 19. The biggest challenge that the retailers will have to face would be of maintaining different brandimages, and though clashing images would be formed, a few retailers would be able to use BrandExtensions to estblish different images in different cities.Dual focus on costs and timeWith more dual income families consumer ability to spend will increase, but the time availablefor shopping will go down. Customers will become more demanding in terms of rapid andfriendly service. Retailers would develop shopping as an entertaining experience, but the moresuccessful ones will be the ones who provide faster service.On the other hand, increasing competition would push the prices down. Efficiencies in supplychain and economies of scale would allow retailers to reduce their prices without compromisingeither on the shopping experience or on their own profitability.24 hours retailingTime stressed consumers will also ask for round the clock retailing. As these consumers will beready to pay a premium for service at odd hours, the timings of shopping will have to adapt toneeds of these consumers. A number of 24 hours retail stores would emerge to cater to this need.The assumption here is that the current administrative restrictions on running shops at nights willbe lifted. It is expected that in the face of increasing demand from both the consumers and theindustry fora, regulations regarding retailing will be eased. 19
  20. 20. Small retailer will coexistWithin a decade, large organised retailers would be controlling a substantial portion of the retailtrade. Yet, it is not to say that small, independent and unorganised retailers will disppear in largenumbers. They will survive on their core strengths of personal relations with customers andcloseness to residences. The experiences of South East Asian countries has been that even after10 to 15 years of allowing FDI in retailing, unrganised retailers still control a sizeable chunk ofthe retailing market. The Indian experience in retailing is expected to be no different.However, to compete with the big retailers on price, small retailers will form cooperatives forpurchasing, just as the once in France, spain and Italy have already done. This trend has alsostarted in Delhi, and is only expected to nicrease.Supply chain dynamicsThe balance of power between retailers and manufacturers will shift towards the retailers. Thebigger retailers would be able to seek the lowest prices, require their suppliers to assume greaterbusiness risks, and colloborate with suppliers to achieve overall cost reduction in theiroperations.Scale economics would help in operating optimized supply chains and logistics network withinvestments in information technology enabling process effeciencies and effectiveness. Increasedvolumes would enable investments in specialised equipment for transportation of goods.Retailers with large chains would negotiate and get central procurement but local dispatchesfrom their suppliers. 20
  21. 21. InternetInternet retailing will thrive in the coming decade. It may not be apparent now because internetaccess is far behind the US and west, and high usage charges represent a serious impediment tofrequent consumer usage. The Government has already shown intent to deregulate thetelecommunications sector. Deregulation would increase Internet usage in the country and alsothe trading on the net.However, it is expected that the bricks and mortar stores converting to clicks and mortar modelwould dominate the Internet sector. ?This is because of their already existing brand names andeconomies of operations that they would be able to reap.Organised versus Unorganised RetailingIn a sharp contrast to the retail sector in developed economies, retailing in India - though large interms of size - is highly fragmented and unorganised. With close to 12 million retail outlets thecountry has one of the highest retail densities worldwide.Retailers include street vendors, supermarkets, department stores, restaurants, hotels and eventwo-wheeler and car showrooms.Counter stores, kiosks, street markets and vendors, where the ownership and management restwith one person, are classified as traditional or unorganised retail outlets.These formats typically require employees with low skills and account for around two-thirds ofthe sectors output. These are highly competitive outlets, with minimal rental costs (unregistered 21
  22. 22. kiosks or traditional property), cheap labour (work is shared by family members) and negligibleoverheads and taxes.However, unorganised retailers suffer due to poor shopping experience and inability to offer awide range of products and value-addition due to lack of sourcing capabilities.The modern Indian consumer is seeking more value in terms of improved availability andquality, pleasant shopping environment, financing options, trial rooms for clothing products,return and exchange policies and competitive prices. This has created a rapidly growingopportunity for organised, modern retail formats to emerge in recent years and grow at a fastpace.Inefficiency in the existing supply chains presents further opportunity for organised players todraw on this large market even as lack of consumer culture and low purchasing power restrictedthe development of modern formats. Migration from unorganised to organised retail has beenvisible with economic development in most countries. 22
  23. 23. OBJECTIVES OF THE PROJECTThe first step in any Marketing Research calls for the researcher to define the project scope andthen define problem carefully and formulate the research Objectives. An oldage says, “Aproblem well defined is half solved.”To study the “Consumer Buying Behavior and Brand Perception of Consumers in ShoppingMalls on M.G.Road”, research was conducted on following objectives. : - 1. Find out the different types of buying behavior of consumers in different shopping malls on M.G.Road. 2. To study which type of consumers visit the different shopping malls. 3. Purpose to come to shopping malls. 23
  24. 24. 4. What the consumer think about the particular shopping mall as a brand in shopping malls.5. How consumers motivate to visit any shopping mall?6. In shopping malls on which sector they spend the most.7. How Shopping malls are different from each other regarding the types of consumers and their buying behavior.8. Analysis of buying behavior pattern and brand perception.And based on above findings, Recommendations on followings: -1. How to increase the conversion ratio of footfalls to buying in shopping mall?2. How to increase the footfalls in shopping malls?3. For what type of consumers, Shopping Mall should make its plans. 24
  25. 25. RESEARCH METHODOLOGYResearch Plan is not specific for all types of research; it is decided depending upon the nature ofthe problem. It can be – Exploratory, Descriptive or CausalExploratory – means to gather data to shed light on the real nature of the problem and suggestpossible solutions or new ideas.Descriptive – It seeks to ascertain magnititide.Causal- It is study of cause and effect relationship.To study the consumer buying behavior and brand perception of consumers in shopping malls isdescriptive research.Designing a research plan calls for decisions on the - 1. Data sources, 2. Research approaches, 3. Research Instruments, 25
  26. 26. 4. Sampling plan, and 5. Contact methods.DATA SOURCES: -The research involved gathering Secondary data as well as Primary data. For the purpose surveywas conducted by me to collect the data – • CONSUMER SURVEYPRIMARY – DATACustomer survey was conducted to gather initial data from the market. Here, the main emphasiswas given on the consumers because they are the one’s on which I have to do my project.Consumers decide the brand of any shopping mall and they are different to each other on variousaspects.Consumer survey was done to know their purchasing behaviour in different shopping malls onM.G.Road. They are the one who constitute the market and the target of the business. InShopping Malls Industry, until and unless we have the knowledge of consumer buying behaviorand where they spend the most and what they think, about the mall cannot increase the footfalland conversition ratio. Hence a consumer survey was done to know their wants, purchasingpower, and buying habits to know their brand perception and buying behavior in shopping malls.SECONDARY DATA: -Secondary data regarding foot falls in shopping mall, buying pattern and other related wascollected from the internet and mall management itself. 26
  27. 27. RESEARCH APPROACH: -Primary data can be collected in four ways –1. Observational research2. Focus – group research3. Survey research4. Experimenntal researchSurvey research - Survey research is best suited for my purpose i.e. for the DescriptedResearch. Survey of consumers this mode helped me to know consumers, their preferences andbrand perception.RESEARCH INSTRUMENT: -In marketing research, the main research instrument used in collecting primary data is theQuestionnaire. For this research, two different set of questionnaire were structured one for theconsumer buying behavior and the other for the consumer brand perception. Both thequestionnaire was open ended i.e. allowed them to response in their own words.Consumer SurveyOpen Ended questionnaire was put to them. It had a set of option and the respondent made achoice among them.For detail of Questionnaire, See Annexure-SAMPLE PLANThe Sample Plan calls for three decision: - • Sampling Unit, • Sample Size, • Sampling Procedure. 27
  28. 28. CONSUMER SURVEY: -Sample Unit: ConsumersSample Size: 1. MGF Metropolitan Mall – 30 2. Sahara Mall – 25 3. MGF Plaza – 25Total – 80  Sample Procedure: Nonprobability Convenience Sample was adopted i.e. the most accessible members of the population. Random selection of consumers.RETAILER SURVEY:-Sample unit: - retailersSample size:-50Contact MethodThe best-suited method for this kind of survey is Personal Interview. Through this method ofconducting research more questions can be asked and it helps in collecting additionalinformation, which may be useful for the company. 28
  29. 29. LIMITATIONS OF PROJECT1. Only a small population of the consumers were studied, which may not be enough to throw correct picture.2. The consumers were very reluctant to answer the question and the response may be biased.3. The answers given by the consumers were too vague to deduct exact figures.4. The DLF City Centre was not studied due to the permission problem. 29
  30. 30. MGF GROUPThe Motor and General Finance Ltd. is one of Indias oldest financial companies, and todayamong the acknowledged leaders in the industry. We provide here an outline of the groups wide-ranging development financing and fund management experience, and the scope of ouroperations today. The motor and General Finance has now become the MGF Group, withcompanies involved in Hire Purchase and leasing, construction and real estate development andautomotive dealerships.Following are the companies within the MGF Fold:1.MGF Developments Ltd. 8. The Motor and General Finance Ltd.2.MGF Motors Pvt. Ltd. 9.MGF (INDIA) Ltd.3.MGF Automobiles Pvt. Ltd. 10. India Lease Developments Ltd.4. Capital Vehicle Sales Pvt. Ltd. 11.Jaybharat Credit Ltd. 30
  31. 31. 5. Compact Motors Ltd. 12.Goodwill India Ltd.6. Kerala Cars Pvt. Ltd. 13 MGF Services Ltd.7.Omega Motors Pvt. Ltd.Stretching hands across the globe, MGF became the first Indian finance company to set up ajoint venture called the India Lease Development Ltd. (ILD), with the International FinanceCorporation, the World Bank subsidiary, in Washington D.C.MGF has actively considered an entry into the insurance business and in the current budget theGovernment of India has opened the insurance sector to private participation. MGF is seekingtie-ups to develop joint ventures dedicated to the conduct of automotive, casualty and propertyinsurance business in India. 31
  32. 32. Proud AssociationAcknowledged as the leaders in private finance, MGF Limited is one of the respected membersof the Asian Leasing Association. It is also among the Founder Member of the Federation ofIndian Hire Purchase and Equipment Leasing Association of India.Above all, MGF takes special pride in its close association with millions of satisfied customers inevery nook and corner of the country. ANALYSIS DATA ANALYSIS PREPARATIONRETAILERSDo you agree that there is trend towards organised retail in India? 32
  33. 33. 50 50 40 30 20 10 0 0 YES NODo you think large organized retailers would be controlling a substantial portion of the retailtrade? 50 50 40 30 20 10 0 0 YES NO 33
  34. 34. How do you perceive the development of Shopping malls in Delhi and NCR Region? 45 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 5 0 Healthy Trend Unhealthy TrendWhat according to you is the purpose of the customers visit to the Shopping Malls? 50 50 45 45 42 40 38 40 30 20 12 8 10 10 5 5 0 Yes No Food and Beverages Music and Entertainm ent Life style products Latest Fashion and Clothing Choosing gifts Consum er Durable 34
  35. 35. What according to you are the reasons for buying at that particular shopping mall (Please rank them in order of preference?) 5 4 5 3 4 2 3 2 1 1 0 Nearness to house/locality Good range available Friendly shopkeeper/ good relations Good ambience Good bargainRank (1-6) the following factors, which influence the customer purchase decision at a shoppingmall. 6 6 5 4 4 3 2 2 1 0 Price Brand Location of Mall Parking At Outlet/Mall Appealing Ambience 3-D Column 6 35
  36. 36. Do shopping malls have the following advantages? 50 50 50 48 45 39 40 35 32 32 30 25 20 18 18 15 11 10 5 2 0 0 0 Yes No Tim e Factor Discount schem es Adequate parking space Individual sections for all categories Good shopping experience in better place w ith convenience and variety. Organized shops w ith international am bience &air condition all-around.Do you think India has a potential in the Retail industry? 50 50 40 30 20 10 0 0 YES NO 36
  37. 37. Do you think that organized retail will provide many opportunities both to existing players aswell as new entrants? 50 50 40 30 20 10 0 0 YES NODo you think India is prepared for open competition? 50 50 40 30 20 10 0 0 YES NO 37
  38. 38. CONSUMER BUYING BEHAVIOUR IN METROPOLITIAN MALL1. Age group in Metropolitan mall.Below 20 yrs. 20-25 yrs. 25-35 yrs. 35 yrs.& above 50 90 90 35 age group in metropolitan mall 35 50 Below 20 yrs. 20-25 yrs. 25-35 yrs. 90 35 yrs.& above 90 38
  39. 39. 2. Category of consumers in the age group of below 20 years HOME STUDENT BUSINESS PROFESSION SERVICES MAKER 35 0 0 15 0 0% 30% STUDENT BUSINESS PROFESSSION 0% SERVICES 70% HOMEMAKERS 0% 3. Frequency of visit to the mall of age group below 20 yrs. Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Any other 5 35 5 5 10% 10% 10% Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Any other 70% 39
  40. 40. 4. Purpose to come to shopping mall of age group below 20yrs. Fun & Entertainment Family Outing Shopping Eating’s 40 0 5 5 Fun & 10% Entertainment 10% Family Outing 0% Shopping 80% Eating’s 5. Annual Household Income in the age group below 20 yrs. Below Rs.2Lakhs Rs.2-5Lakhs Rs. 5-10Lakhs Rs. 10Lakhs & Above 5 40 5 0 10% 0% 10% Below Rs.2Lakhs Rs.2-5Lakhs Rs. 5-10Lakhs Rs. 10Lakhs & Above 80% 40
  41. 41. 6. Spend per visit in shopping mall in the age group below 20 yrs. Up to Rs. 200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 5 30 15 0 0% 10% Up to Rs. 200 30% Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 60% Rs.2500 & Above 7. Sectors on which they spend the most below 20yrs. Consumers. Food & Beauty Music & Gifts &Apparels Beverages Products Entertainment Watches Sportswear 5 5 0 40 0 0 Apparels 0% 0% Food & Beverages 10% 10% Beauty Products 0% Music & 80% Entertainment Gifts & Watches Sportswear 8. Favorite shopping mall on M.G.Road. 41
  42. 42. Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 45 5 0 10% 0% Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 90% 9. Category of consumers of age group 20 – 25 yrs.Student Business Professional Services Homemaker 30 5 35 20 0 0% 22% 33% Student Business Professional Services Homemaker 6% 39% 10. How often they come to shopping mall.Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Any other 10 60 15 5 42
  43. 43. 6% 11% 17% Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Any other 66% 11. Purpose to come to shopping mall. Fun & Shopping Entertainment Eating Family Outing 10 50 30 0 Shopping 0% 11% 33% Fun & Entertainment Eating 56% Family Outing12. Annual household’s income. Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above 15 65 5 5 43
  44. 44. 6% 6% 17% Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above 71%13. Spend per visit in shopping mall. Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 5 60 20 5 6% 6% 22% Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 66% 14. Categories on which they spend the most. Music & Gifts & Apparels Food & Beverages Entertainment Sportswear Watches 5 15 60 5 5 44
  45. 45. Apparels Food & Beverages 6% 6% 6% 16% Music & Entertainment 66% Sportswear Gifts & Watches15.Favourite shopping mall on M.G.Road. Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 70 10 10 11% 11% Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 78%16.Category Of the consumer’s of age group between 25 – 35 yrs. Student Business Professional Services Homemaker 0 10 35 30 15 45
  46. 46. 0% 11% 17% Student Business Professional 39% Services 33% Homemaker17. How often they come to shopping mall. Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 0 70 5 15 17% 0% 6% Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 77%18. Annual household’s income. Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above 10 55 15 10 46
  47. 47. 19. Spend per visit in shopping mall. Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 0 40 45 5 0% 6% Up to Rs.200 44% Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 50% Rs.2500 & Above20. Favorite shopping mall on M.G.Road. Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 47
  48. 48. 75 10 5 6% 11% Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 83% 221.Category of consumer’s of age group 35 and above. Student Business Professional Services Homemaker 0 5 5 20 5 14% 0% 14% Student 14% Business Professional Services Homemaker 58%22. How often they come to shopping mall. Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 0 5 0 30 48
  49. 49. 0% 14% 0% Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 86%23. Purpose to come to shopping mall. Shopping Fun & Entertainment Eating Family Outing 20 30 25 15 Purpose to come to shopping Mall Shopping 15 20 Fun & Entertainment Eating Family Outing 25 3024. Annual household income. Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above 0 25 10 0 49
  50. 50. 0% 29% 0% Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs 71% Rs. 10 lakhs & above25. Spend per visit in shopping mall. Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 5 15 10 5 14% 14% Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 29% 43% Rs.2500 & Above26. Favourite shopping mall on M.G.Road. Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 10 15 10 50
  51. 51. 29% 29% Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 42% 51
  52. 52. Consumer Buying Behavior in Sahara Mall1. Age group of consumers in Sahara Mall. Below 20 yrs. 20-25 yrs. 25-35 yrs. 35 yrs.& above 20 35 85 125 age group 8% 13% Below 20 yrs. 47% 20-25 yrs. 25-35 yrs. 35 yrs.& above 32%2. Category of consumers in Sahara Mall. Student Business Professional Services Homemaker 15 25 50 50 125 Category of consumers 6% 9% Student 47% 19% Business Professional Services Homemaker 19%3. How often Homemaker visit the Sahara mall. Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 0 35 15 75 52
  53. 53. 0% 28% Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week 60% Other 12%4. Homemakers annual Households Income. Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above 15 75 25 10 8% 12% 20% Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above 60%5. How much homemakers spend in Sahara Mall. Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 10 15 75 25 53
  54. 54. Category of consumers 25 10 Up to Rs.200 15 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 756. On which sector households spend the most. Apparels Food & Beverages Households Sportswear 25 10 90 0 0% 20% Apparels 8% Food & Beverages Households 72% Sportswear7. What attracts them to come to shopping mall? Branded Ambience & Shops Discount Schemes Facilities Entertainment 10 100 15 0 54
  55. 55. Branded Shops 12% 0% 8% Discount Schemes Ambience & Facilities 80% Entertainment8. Favourite shopping mall of homemakers on M.G. road. Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 15 85 25 20% 12% Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 68%9. How often Consumers (Services) visit the Sahara mall. Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 0 35 5 10 55
  56. 56. 20% 0% Everyday Once in a week 10% Twice in a week 70% Other10. How much service consumers spend in Sahara Mall. Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 0 15 30 5 Up to Rs.200 10% 0% 30% Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 60% 56
  57. 57. 11. On which sector service consumers spend the most. Apparels Food & Beverages Households 5 5 40 10% 10% Apparels Food & Beverages Households 80%12. Favourite shopping mall on M.G.Road of Service Consumers. Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 35 10 5 Favourite shopping mall 9% 27% Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall 64% MGF Plaza 13. On which sector professional consumers spend the most. 57
  58. 58. Apparels Food & Beverages Households 10 5 35 20% Apparels Food & Beverages 10% Households 70% 14. How much professionals spend in Sahara Mall.Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 0 15 30 5 Up to Rs.200 10% 0% 30% Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 60% 58
  59. 59. 15. Annual household income of professionals. Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above 0 35 15 0 Below 2 lakhs 0% 30% 0% 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs 70% Rs. 10 lakhs & above16. How often professionals visit Sahara Mall. Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 0 5 5 40 0% 10% 10% Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 80% 59
  60. 60. 17. Favourite shopping mall on M.G.Road of Professionals. Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 35 10 5 Favourite shopping mall 5 10 Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 35 18. On which sector Business class consumers spend the most. Apparels Food & Beverages Households 10 5 10 20% 40% Apparels Food & Beverages Households 40% 60
  61. 61. 19. How often they come (Business Class) come to shopping mall. Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 0 5 0 20 0% 20% Everyday 0% Once in a week Twice in a week Other 80%20. Annual household income of Business Class consumers. Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above 0 10 15 0 0% Below 2 lakhs 0% 40% 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs 60% Rs. 10 lakhs & above21. How much business class consumers spend in Sahara Mall. Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 61
  62. 62. 0 0 20 5 0% 20% Up to Rs.200 0% Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 80% Rs.2500 & Above22. Favourite shopping mall on M.G.Road of Business class Consumers. Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 15 5 5 Metropolitan 20% Mall Sahara Mall 20% 60% MGF Plaza 62
  63. 63. 23. How often students visit the Sahara Mall. Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 0 0 0 15 0% 0% 0% Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week 100% Other24. How much student consumers spend in Sahara Mall. Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 0 5 10 0 0% 0% 33% Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 67% Rs.2500 & Above 63
  64. 64. 25. Annual household income of student consumers. Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 – 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above 0 10 5 0 0% 33% 0% Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs 67% Rs. 10 lakhs & above 26. On which sector students consumers spend the most.Apparels Food & Beverages Households10 5 0 0% 33% Apparels Food & Beverages 67% Households 64
  65. 65. 27. Student favourite shopping mall on M. G. Road. Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 15 0 0 0% 0% Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 100% 65
  66. 66. CONSUMER BUYING BEHAVIOR IN MGF PLAZA1. Age group of consumers in MGF Plaza. Below 20 yrs. 20-25 yrs. 25-35 yrs. 35 yrs.& above 5 10 80 120 Age Group Below 20 yrs. 2% 5% 20-25 yrs. 25-35 yrs. 56% 37% 35 & Above2. Category of consumers in MGF Plaza. Student Business Professional Services Homemaker 5 50 25 20 115 Category 2% Student 23% Business Professional 54% Services 12% 9% Homemaker 66
  67. 67. 3. How much Homemakers spend in the MGF Plaza. Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 0 5 25 85 0% 4% 22% Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 74% Rs.2500 & Above4. On which sector homemaker consumers spend the most. Home furnishing Electronic Items Food & Beverages 90 25 0 22% 0% Home furnishing Electronic Items Food & Beverages 78% 67
  68. 68. 5. Annual household income of homemaker consumers. Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above 0 50 45 20 Below 2 lakhs 17% 0% 2- 5 lakhs 44% 5 - 10 lakhs 39% Rs. 10 lakhs & above 76. How often homemakers visit the shopping mall. Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 0 15 0 100 13% 0% Everyday 0% Once in a week Twice in a week 87% Other 68
  69. 69. 7. Homemakers favourite shopping mall on M. G. Road. Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 5 80 20 19% 5% Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 76% 8. How much Business class consumers spend in the MGF Plaza. Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 0 0 25 25 0% 0% Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 50% 50% Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 69
  70. 70. 9. On which sector business class consumers spend the most. Home furnishing Electronic Items Food & Beverages 35 15 0 0, 0% 15, 30% Home furnishing Electronic Items 35, 70% Food & Beverages10. Annual household income of business class consumers. Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above 0 25 15 10 20% 0% Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 50% 5 - 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above 30%11. How often business class consumers visit the mall. 70
  71. 71. Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 0 5 0 45 10% 0% 0% Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 90%12. Business class favourite shopping mall on M. G. Road. Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 25 15 10 10, 20% 25, 50% 15, 30% Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 13. How much professionals consumers spend in the MGF Plaza. 71
  72. 72. Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 0 0 20 5 0% 20% 0% Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 80%14. How often professional consumers visit the mall. Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 0 5 0 20 0% 20% 0% Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 80%15. Annual household income of professional consumers. Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above 72
  73. 73. 0 20 5 0 0% 20% 0% Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above 80%16. On which sector professional consumers spend the most. Home furnishing Electronic Items Food & Beverages 20 5 0 5, 20% 0, 0% Hom e furnis hing 20, 80% Electronic Item s Food & Beverages17. Professionals favourite shopping mall on M. G. Road. Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 20 2 3 73
  74. 74. 3, 12% 2, 8% Metropolitan Mall 20, 80% Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 18. How much service class spends in the MGF Plaza?Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 0 0 15 5 0% 25% 0% Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 75% 74
  75. 75. 19. How often service consumers visit the mall. Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 0 0 0 20 0% Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 100%20. On which sector services consumers spend the most. Home furnishing Electronic Items Food & Beverages 10 10 0 0, 0% Hom e furnis hing 10, 50% 10, 50% Electronic Item s Food & Beverages 75
  76. 76. 21. Annual household income of service class consumers. Below 2 lakhs 2- 5 lakhs 5 - 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above 0 10 10 0 0% Below 2 lakhs 0% 2- 5 lakhs 50% 50% 5 - 10 lakhs Rs. 10 lakhs & above22. Service class consumer’s favourite shopping mall on M. G. Road. Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 2 10 8 10% 40% Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall 50% MGF Plaza 23. How much money student class spends in the MGF Plaza? Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 0 5 0 0 76
  77. 77. 0% 0% 0% Up to Rs.200 Rs.200-500 Rs.500-2500 Rs.2500 & Above 100%24. On which sector student consumers spend the most. Home furnishing Electronic Items Food & Beverages 0 0 5 0% 0% Home furnishing Electronic Items Food & Beverages 100%25. How often student consumers visit the mall. Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 0 0 0 5 77
  78. 78. 0% 0% 0% Everyday Once in a week Twice in a week Other 100%26. Student consumer’s favorite shopping mall on M. G. Road. Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 5 0 0 0% 0% Metropolitan Mall Sahara Mall MGF Plaza 100% 78
  79. 79. CONSUMER BRAND PERCEPTION IN METROPOLITAN MALL 1. Brand image of metropolitan mall in consumers.PVR Metropolitan Mall Shoppers Stops Mc Donald150 70 65 30 10% PVR 21% 47% Metropolitan Mall 22% Shoppers Stops Mc Donald 2. Perception of Metropolitan Mall as a Brand. Good place for familyGood Eating Place shopping Good entertainment place 75 25 165 Good Eating Place 28% Good place for family shopping 63% 9% Good entertainment place 79

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