How a Bill Becomes Law
Review
Article I of the Constitution created the
House of Representatives and the
Senate which together make up
Congress.
...
How does a law start
Every law begins as a bill.
 When a group of
citizens, organized groups or
political parties has an ...
We have a Bill, now what?
Once presented to Congress, the bill
is assigned a number and sent to a
committee who verifies t...
Bill’s almost there…...


Once the bill arrives back on the floor
of
the House or
Senate
it will then be read
to the floo...
House v Senate
Despite the outline of the process being the
same in both there are some drastic
differences in the way thi...
Bill’s feeling deja vu
If the bill makes it through it’s second journey of
Congress in the identical form it may be sent t...
Nothing can stop Bill now, can it?

After both houses have approved and sent the bill to the
President, where he may sign ...
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How a Bill Becomes Law

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How a Bill Becomes Law

  1. 1. How a Bill Becomes Law
  2. 2. Review Article I of the Constitution created the House of Representatives and the Senate which together make up Congress.  Article I also grants Congress the power, among other things, to create laws.  U.S. Senate consists of 2 senators from each state and the House currentlyGus Bilirakis R-FL 12  th District
  3. 3. How does a law start Every law begins as a bill.  When a group of citizens, organized groups or political parties has an idea for a law they submit it to either their Senator or their Representative.  If that Congressperson believes it’s a worthy cause, they will draft a bill that will be submitted to the House or Senate. 
  4. 4. We have a Bill, now what? Once presented to Congress, the bill is assigned a number and sent to a committee who verifies the bill’s merit.  The committee then assigns a specialized subcommittee to investigate and revise.  Finally the whole committee will debate and vote on the bill as to whether it should be sent to the floor. 
  5. 5. Bill’s almost there…...  Once the bill arrives back on the floor of the House or Senate it will then be read to the floor, next a debate and finally it will be voted on.  If it passes it moves from the House to Senate or Senate to House and the
  6. 6. House v Senate Despite the outline of the process being the same in both there are some drastic differences in the way things are done.  In the House before a bill reaches the floor, it is decided how long the debate will last.  In the Senate there is no time limit, which may allow a senator to talk a bill to death, also called a filibuster. However if 3/5ths of the Senate approves they may end the debate which is called cloture. 
  7. 7. Bill’s feeling deja vu If the bill makes it through it’s second journey of Congress in the identical form it may be sent to the President.  If there are changes made to it the second time around, it gets sent back to the original house of Congress.  If they don’t agree, then a conference committee made up of both Senators and Representatives is called to make suitable changes. 
  8. 8. Nothing can stop Bill now, can it? After both houses have approved and sent the bill to the President, where he may sign it into a law.  However, as part of the checks and balances the President may also veto or ignore the bill.  If ignored for 10 days the bill becomes a law unless Congress adjourns, then it’s pocket vetoed which effectively kills the bill.  If the President chooses to veto the bill, it gets sent back to Congress where the veto can be overridden if both houses pass it with a 2/3rds vote. 

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