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"Using Blockchain Technology to Maintain OERs and IPs" by Sherry Jones (April 7, 2016)

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April 7, 2016 - The presentation was part of the Intellectual Property Caucus Panel Presentation, held on April 7, 2016, at the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) 2016.

Jones addresses how blockchain technology, the protocol that underlies and powers bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, can help solve the problem of maintaining intellectual property (IP) rights over open educational resources (OERs), and how blockchain technology will influence the future of the writing discipline and pedagogy.

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"Using Blockchain Technology to Maintain OERs and IPs" by Sherry Jones (April 7, 2016)

  1. 1. Sherry Jones Rocky Mountain College of Art & Design Using Blockchain Technology to Maintain OERs and IPs
  2. 2. Introduction The following presentation by Sherry Jones was part of the Intellectual Property Caucus Panel Presentation, held on April 7, 2016, at the Conference on College Composition and Communication (CCCC) 2016. Jones addressed how blockchain technology, the protocol that underlies and powers bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, could help solve the problem of maintaining intellectual property (IP) rights over open educational resources (OERs), and how blockchain technology could influence the future of the writing discipline and pedagogy.
  3. 3. 3 Points to Address 1. Promoting the publication of OER alone is not enough to ensure recognition of IP. 2. OER + Blockchain Technology will be a possible solution for maintaining IP for both universities and educators/students. 3. Students will become publishers of OERs (and co-owners with universities of the IP of OERs).
  4. 4. rgMOOC: An OER Project • OER Project: rgMOOC (2013), formally known as “Rhetoric and Composition: The Persuasive Power of Video Games as Paratexts,” is a globally open-access English Composition II MOOC; the project was funded by the Colorado Immersive and Game- Based Learning Initiative; Jones served as the principal investigator and UX designer of the rgMOOC open access learning environment. The course was co-taught by Jones and Caruso. • OER Artifacts: All instructors and students made artifacts were published as OERs. • OER Publication Method: Artifacts were published on web 2.0, social media, and LOR. • OER Project Design Logic: 1) Enable instructors to share their materials with the world; 2) enable college and instructors/students maintain co-ownership over creative commons IP of all artifacts; 3) enable students to add their rgMOOC artifacts to online portfolios.
  5. 5. rgMOOC OER Artifact: Mightybell ● Asynchronous weekly discussions with alternate reality game (ARG) style YouTube videos were published on the Mightybell. ● Using avatar names (to protect privacy), students watched and answered questions publicly on Mightybell. ● All Mightybell discussions were published as OERs.
  6. 6. rgMOOC OER Artifact: Twitter ● Synchronous weekly Q & As, in the style of alternate reality games (ARG) were held on Twitter. ● Instructors, students, and anyone on the web communicated via avatar handles (to protect privacy). ● All Twitter prompts and responses were open access.
  7. 7. rgMOOC OER Artifact: Titanpad ● a synchronous 2 hours collaborative essay writing competition was held on Titanpad. ● 14–16 students per group co- authored multiple Titanpad essays. ● Students collectively published their works as OERs with rgMOOC attribution.
  8. 8. rgMOOC OER Artifact: Pathbrite ● All rgMOOC video tutorials were published as OERs on Pathbrite. ● Pathbrite served as the library or the “secret vault” of rgMOOC.
  9. 9. 3 Problems Encountered with rgMOOC OERs 1. OERs published within the college LOR system were hidden from public view (not open access). 2. OERs published on the web lacked permanence (technologies can change how and where information is displayed). 3. Creative Commons IP was not always recognized; those who borrowed rgMOOC materials did not provide proper CC attribution. Recognizing CC IP helps build author’s ethos (compensation is not of primary concern).
  10. 10. Proposal: Use Blockchain to Maintain OER IP (1 of 2) • What is Blockchain? Blockchain is a distributed database and public ledger technology that powers Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. • What does Blockchain do? It saves information in a “block” that is added to the end of a chain of records; it maintains permanence of the original information recorded and shared with a community by referencing previous records (all records are permanent and traceable). • Why is Blockchain revolutionary? It supports the “decentralization” of information, meaning that there is no need to store information in a central database, while maintaining records of all information with attribution to the originating creator/author. Eliminating chances of fraud and manipulation.
  11. 11. Blockchain Technology in Banking Illustrated Image Source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/vivekravisankar/2015/11/01/blockchain-the- decentralization-of-cs-education/#56b123936576
  12. 12. Proposal: Use Blockchain to Maintain OER IP (2 of 2) • Blockchain in Education? On Feb. 22, 2016, Sony Global Education (a division of Sony) announced that it is using blockchain to house educational data for association with a “universal education ID.” • Blockchain Supports IP? Melanie Swan, founder of Institute for Blockchain Studies and affiliate scholar of IEET, predicts that “blockchain could replace or supplement all existing IP management systems” (Swan, 2015, VII, Blockchain: Blueprint for a New Economy). • Blockchain for OERs? Since blockchain will help maintain OER permanence and traceability, it eliminate the need to save OERs on centralized databases, such as LOR.
  13. 13. Implications of Blockchain for Higher Education, Writers/Authors, and the Teaching of Writing • Higher Education: 1) Colleges can leverage blockchain technology to document all educational records, and to ensure that all student-made-artifacts will carry both the colleges’ and students’ information (co-ownership of IP) in a blockchain; 2) plagiarism checking will be made obsolete by blockchain. • Writers/Authors: 1) Can claim authorship over a piece of writing no matter how many copies of that same writing exist; 2) self-publishing is supported with no fear of IP loss. • Teaching of Writing: Encourage students to collaborate and publish writings, in a community of writers, for real audiences as OERs (supporting the mission of WAC and WID), while upholding both college and students’ co-ownership of IP.
  14. 14. Presentation By: Sherry Jones Philosophy | Rhetoric | Game Studies sherryjones.edtech@gmail.com Twitter @autnes http://about.me/sherryjones

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