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BOOM Units: Four steps to turn you team into a lean, product development machine

BOOM Units: Four steps to turn you team into a lean, product development machine

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In the agricultural age, it took 182 years to build Notre Dame cathedral. In the industrial age, it took Bell Labs 22 years to design the push-button telephone. In the design age, you can build big, huge systems as fast as you can connect different frameworks. You no longer have 22 years — much less 182 years. To succeed in the design age, product development has to evolve.

Successful product teams have evolved into something akin to an emergency service:

Triage to identify what needs fixing
Treat acute, urgent problems as quickly and safely as possible
Prescribe actions to prevent future problems
Successful teams launch new products with big impacts quickly like a bomb going off: Boom. Successful teams are B.O.O.M. Units. In this presentation, we’ll examine the four attributes of these high-performing teams:

Balanced teams: activate the talents of every team member
Outcome-focused: teams focus relentlessly on the experience
On-time delivery: each team member delivers their part just-in-time
Maximized impact: team members choose the smallest change that creates the largest impact
To illustrate these behaviors, we’ll look at four stories that show BOOM Units in action, and for each behavior, we’ll look at a tool you can start using when you go back to work on Monday morning.

For developers, UXers, and project managers who want to deliver more innovation, you can transform your team for the inside out into high-performing BOOM Units.

In the agricultural age, it took 182 years to build Notre Dame cathedral. In the industrial age, it took Bell Labs 22 years to design the push-button telephone. In the design age, you can build big, huge systems as fast as you can connect different frameworks. You no longer have 22 years — much less 182 years. To succeed in the design age, product development has to evolve.

Successful product teams have evolved into something akin to an emergency service:

Triage to identify what needs fixing
Treat acute, urgent problems as quickly and safely as possible
Prescribe actions to prevent future problems
Successful teams launch new products with big impacts quickly like a bomb going off: Boom. Successful teams are B.O.O.M. Units. In this presentation, we’ll examine the four attributes of these high-performing teams:

Balanced teams: activate the talents of every team member
Outcome-focused: teams focus relentlessly on the experience
On-time delivery: each team member delivers their part just-in-time
Maximized impact: team members choose the smallest change that creates the largest impact
To illustrate these behaviors, we’ll look at four stories that show BOOM Units in action, and for each behavior, we’ll look at a tool you can start using when you go back to work on Monday morning.

For developers, UXers, and project managers who want to deliver more innovation, you can transform your team for the inside out into high-performing BOOM Units.

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BOOM Units: Four steps to turn you team into a lean, product development machine

  1. 1. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 Four tools to help evolve your team into a lean, 
 product development machine B.O.O.M.Units
  2. 2. @austingovella #boom http://slideshare.net/austingovella/boomunits From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  3. 3. In the Fall of 2013, we executed the perfect project. A national furniture retailer asked my company to redesign the home and product screens for their ecommerce website. I worked with one of our best project managers, one of our best visual designers, one of our best technical architects, and sought frequent feedback and critiques from leading minds inside our organization. We identified goals, communicated them relentlessly, framed every design decision as an experiment around specific user-centered metrics, and worked so collaboratively with the client, they pitched, rationalized, and defended design decisions better than we could. The team of brilliant engineers developed, tested, and pushed the screens, so the client could begin their ongoing testing and optimization. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  4. 4. The perfect project failed. Interactions couldn’t be measured, screens couldn’t be optimized, conversions couldn’t be improved, furniture wasn’t being sold, and it couldn’t be fixed so furniture could be sold. In every way that mattered, the perfect team with the perfect engagement with the perfect process produced the perfect failure. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  5. 5. The Agricultural Age To sell 1 blanket: 1. Raise a bunch of sheep 2. Shear a bunch of sheep 3. Spin a bunch of wool From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015Wolf4max on FLickr
  6. 6. to sell 100 blankets 1. buy yarn from a bunch of farmers 2. pay a bunch of people 3. run wool through a bunch of looms Library of Congress The Industrial Age From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  7. 7. This isn’t the information age or the experience economy or the digital age. In the agricultural age, agricultural processes drove the production of products. In the industrial age, industrial processes drive the production of products. In our age, production is driven by how well you design your web of frameworks. We live in the design age where you can make anything anywhere faster than you can think. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  8. 8. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 to sell 100,000 blankets 1. query a service that lists a bunch of blanket vendors 2. integrate a bunch of product information 3. publish a catalog of blankets
  9. 9. Architecture, design, and development frameworks accelerate pace of work across a multiplicity of platforms, channels, and contexts. Teams deliver faster than they can think. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  10. 10. Diverse, uneven teams need different architecture, design, and development. There is no one process. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  11. 11. You have to work like an emergency service: 1. Triage need 2. Provide first aid 3. Prescribe for the future From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  12. 12. Balanced teams On-time delivery Outcome-focused Maximum impact B.O.O.M.Units From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  13. 13. This is a way for modern teams to approach problems, 
 not a solution to your problems. Every project, team, product will have different answers. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  14. 14. Most people define learning as “problem solving,” so they focus correcting errors outside of themselves and their teams. You must also reflect on your process, identify how your process contributes to the problem, and then change your process. You must learn how the way you define and solve problems can be a source of problems. • A thermostat that turns on the heat whenever the temperature in a room drops below 68 degrees is an example of single-loop learning. • A thermostat that could ask, “Why am I set at 68 degrees?” and explore whether another temperature might be more economical would be an example of double-loop learning. Adapted from “Teaching smart people how to learn” by Chris Argyris, Harvard Business Review, May-June, 1991. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  15. 15. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 BALANCED TEAMS everyone carries equal weight
  16. 16. At my current job, we have an on staff UI/UX person and since we adopted Scrum across our entire team about two months ago, she has been struggling... 
 I fear our UX person has basically just stopped participating in team activities to everyone's detriment... I'd appreciate any thoughts on how I might help her re-engage and figure out how she might adjust her work to fit in better with an agile process. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  17. 17. Introduction “When you’re in a Toyota plant (including San Antonio, where I live), you see workers pulling the cords fairly frequently. And, when they do, a team leader is there within seconds.” Mark Graban, “Why Toyota is Eliminating the Andon Cord from its Factories" From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015Image source: allomaths.fr
  18. 18. With the Andon cord, anyone can stop the line and not everyone needs to know why. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  19. 19. Balanced teams require that everyone trusts everyone else’s decisions. How do you ensure you trust decisions made when you’re not there? How do other people trust you? From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  20. 20. The Team Entangler Tactic: • Everyone attends all meetings Benefit: • Fuels shared learning • Breeds shared vision • Generates shared commitment From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 SPECIAL BOOM POWER
  21. 21. The Un-Entangler Tactic: • Everyone works independently Benefit: • Increases team’s work-in-process • Allows flow and deep dives From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 SPECIAL BOOM POWER
  22. 22. Knowing what everyone is responsible for helps you work on your part alone and pull in the right people when you need to. R - Responsible A - Accountable C - Consulted I - Informed From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 UX Business analysis Front-end dev Back-end dev Data C R A Data format A R I A Content R C I Layout R A Behavior R C A C Visual design R A HTML/CSS/ JS C I R C CMS integration I C R C Application integration I C I R
  23. 23. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 OUTCOME-FOCUSED vision, not process
  24. 24. I had a reasonably well abstracted sense of the pillars of the platform we needed to develop… [that] could create a shared understanding and a shared vocabulary and (ultimately) a whole lot less code. Unfortunately, when I began to work with Vendor 1 they had no interest in hearing about my pillars. They wanted to work from a simple vision and hundreds of user stories that made no attempt to abstract any concepts that could add to comprehension, achieve efficiencies through reuse… They claimed that emergent design and refactoring would do the trick. Well.... it is two years later and we still don't have time to refactor and the complexity of the poorly abstracted code means we probably never will. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015https://www.scrum.org/Forums/aft/1222
  25. 25. 1 digital platform 3 internal departments 9 lines of business 43 websites 3 marketing agencies my company From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  26. 26. Outcome-focused teams share a concrete, testable vision of the future that allows teams to work independently and provides a common language for collaboration. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  27. 27. The Vision-Ator Tactic: • Collaboratively identify goals/vision Benefit: • Creates shared vision • Creates shared language for collaboration From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 SPECIAL BOOM POWER
  28. 28. Current state, goals, drivers, barriers, future state (vision), and measurement From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  29. 29. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 ON-TIME DELIVERY relays depend on hand-offs
  30. 30. As the technical architect, he’s on the hook for delivering everything after this. If you keep changing the design, then he won’t be able to deliver on time. We have to extend the schedule and it will start costing us $100,000 a week. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  31. 31. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015Do people learn like buildings do
  32. 32. The Shelf-Inator Tactic: • When ready, place work on a “shelf” Benefit: • Manages slip between workstreams • Enables “pull” From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 SPECIAL BOOM POWER
  33. 33. Early is a burden. Don’t make your team think about things they don’t need to. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  34. 34. Waiting is inefficient. Don’t make the team wait on something they need. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  35. 35. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 MAXIMUM IMPACT Just enough for you is just enough for the team
  36. 36. I won’t have it ready for review until tomorrow. I need to go clean it up. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  37. 37. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  38. 38. Deliver exactly what you need and no more. Complete the smallest task that gives you the biggest value the fastest way. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  39. 39. The User-Nator Tactic: • Right-fidelity user models Benefit: • Identifies key user attributes From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 SPECIAL BOOM POWER
  40. 40. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 User Sales Manager Sammy Sales Manager Sam Crawford, Sales Manager TASKS What will they do with the system? x x x x CONTEXT When, where, and how often will they use the system? x x x INFLUENCERS What pain points, outcomes, and barriers affect usage? x x BONUS: UNKNOWNS What do we not know that we don’t know? x
  41. 41. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 BUSINESS GOAL USER PROFILE DATA RESEARCH METHODS Identify content and functionality Task-based profiles
 What do users do? 1.Stakeholder interviews 2.Competitive analysis Improve efficiency Reduce errors Improve output quality Context-based profiles
 When/where/how do they interact? 1.Web analytics 2.Usability testing Improve conversion Improve adoption Improve retention Increase engagement and/or social activity Influence-based
 What barriers, drivers, and outcomes drive interaction? 1.Contextual inquiry 2.Customer interviews 3.Customer surveys 4.Customer focus groups Maximize customer value (final optimization) Defend existing markets from disruption Innovate new markets Disrupt existing markets Unknown unknowns Analysis identifies new and untapped methods of segmentation. 1.Ethnographic research 2.Diary studies
  42. 42. Don’t do more until you need it, and no earlier. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  43. 43. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 BECOMING A B.O.O.M.UNIT I want you.
  44. 44. Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children the dragons can be killed. GK Chesterton From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  45. 45. Introduction From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 Here, there be DRAGONS!!!
  46. 46. Become A B.O.O.M.Unit • BALANCE YOURSELF Entangle yourself with your team • FOCUS ON OUTCOMES Focus on the experience instead of your tasks and deliverables • DELIVER JUST-IN-TIME Help you and your team stay productive • MAXIMIZE IMPACT Choose the smallest thing with the largest impact From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  47. 47. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015By Jacob Botter on Flickr Ask!!!
  48. 48. You don’t learn to ride a bike by reading a book. You need practice and a willingness to explore. Nothing Is Written, Johnnie Moore and Viv McWaters, 2015 From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  49. 49. Defensive Reasoning (Is Bad) Defensive reasoners ask: • How can I remain in control? • How can I maximize “winning” and minimize “losing”? • How can I reduce negative feelings? Negative feelings include embarrassment, threat, feeling vulnerable, or incompetent. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  50. 50. Introduction B.O.O.M. Units Are Offensive, Not Defensive Offensive reasoners ask themselves: • How can I share control? • How can I focus on learning? • How can I build trust on my team? From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  51. 51. Defensive learners fous on “me” Offensive learners focus on “we” Keep control Share control with the team Maximize “winning” Focus on learning Reduce negative feelings Trust your team Introduction B.O.O.M. Units Are Offensive, Not Defensive From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015
  52. 52. From “B.O.O.M. Units: Four steps to evolve your team into a lean, product development machine” by Austin Govella, Sep 2015 THANK YOU

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