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Two heads are better than one: Five ideas for E-Learning team collaboration

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The E-Learning profession is a high-paced and demanding industry. Many E-Learning professionals feel they are constantly racing to the next goal or to finish their next project. We’ve come up with five tips that will help your team to communicate with one another, enjoy their work and use their time efficiently.

1. Use the best tools
As learning technologists, we know that using the right technology can transform a process or task. By spending time researching the best project management tool for your team, you will save time, money and the sanity of your team. We recommend checking out Basecamp and Trello.

2. Be clear about who is responsible for what
A common frustration for team members is the feeling that they are undertaking work which is not necessarily under their remit. To overcome this, set out clear roles and responsibilities at the beginning and remember to reinforce these when they go astray.

3. Make a clear and concrete plan at the beginning
Be sure to have a project kick-off meeting where all team members are present either virtually or in person. A kick off meeting should communicate the vision for the project, the limits in terms of resources and map out a pathway to be followed. If you can pull this off, it will ensure buy-in from your team and make it easier for them to recognise and rectify any challenges that arise.

4. Make allowances for set-backs and delays
Even with the best of planning, unexpected set-backs are bound to happen; whether a member of your team needs to take a few days off or you have technological issues. By anticipating unexpected and uncontrollable events in your planning, you can ensure that you reach project milestones on time.

5. Create a culture of appreciation
A recent survey by Monster found that 58% of British workers feel they don’t get thanked often enough at work, leading many to feel both under-appreciated and demotivated. If you can lead by example and encourage your team to recognise success, hard work and talent then you will find team members are more engaged, more eager to share their ideas and generally more happy.

Please let us know your comments or share with others who you think may benefit from this. Follow us on twitter @aurionlearning for our latest blog articles and updates.

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Two heads are better than one: Five ideas for E-Learning team collaboration

  1. 1. @aurionlearning /company/aurion-learning/AurionLearning /aurionlearning blog.aurionlearning.com /aurion-learning www.aurionlearning.com ©Aurion Learning 2015 TWO HEADS ONE 5 IDEAS FOR E-LEARNING TEAM COLLABORATION As learning technologists, we know that using the right technology can transform a process or task. By spending time researching the best project management tool for your team, you will save time, money and the sanity of your team. Use the best tools A common frustration for team members is the feeling that they are taking an unfair proportion of the work. Be sure to set out clear roles and responsibilities at the beginning and remember to reinforce these when they go astray. Be clear about who is responsible for what We recommend having a project kick-off meeting where all team members are present. If you can communicate vision, it will ensure buy-in from your team and make it easier for them to recognise and rectify any challenges that arise. Begin with a clear plan Lead by example and encourage your team to recognise success, hard work and talent. You will find team members are more engaged, more eager to share their ideas and generally more happy. Create a culture of appreciation By anticipating and allowing for unexpected or uncontrollable events in your planning, you can ensure that you reach project milestones on time. Make allowances for set-backs or delays

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