Documenting Wa (lawa) Plants     and Herbs for Food and Medicine           in Awa MountainsReport Authors: BAI Zhihong & C...
Aims and Objectives
• to document edible parts of plants and fruits in the natural  habitats of the Wa people in China along the Sino-  Myanma...
MethodologyFocus-group interview  In-depth interview Qualitative analysis
Implementationlocal healthcare officials  fieldwork sites & map      village healers           patients    classroom teach...
• Pre-fieldwork training, discussing topics & methods for  data collection.• 12 students (5 MA) involved in different trip...
Outcomes
Expected outcomes• a colored booklet and CDs (in process);• add teaching and learning materials to Yunnan  University libr...
Outcomes attained• a process of teaching and learning by participating  into lived experiences and affirming LK during the...
Applications/Outputs
Classroom teaching• Anthropological Theories (anthro undergrad. majors)     Structuralism: indigenous taxonomy     Gender ...
Fieldwork: coursework & in the field• Classroom teaching: Fieldwork  methodology (both undergrad. & postgrad.)• In the field
Conclusions
• Getting foot in the village was an eye-opening  experience; focusing on plants and herbs but• multiple fieldwork trips w...
• limited expertise in healing ailments;• traditional healers welcome us as  patients/clients, but not researchers.• confl...
Recommendations
• Research ethics• Local transportation• Intoxication• Need qualitative research
References
Thank you!Report Authors: BAI Zhihong & CHEN XueliInstitution: Yunnan UniversityEmail: baiz@ynu.edu.cn
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Documenting Wa (lawa) Plants and Herbs for Food and Medicine in awa mountains  

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Presented at the Conference/Workshop on Discovering Local Knowledge in the 21s Century, Miriam College

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  • This is a presentation  template. You may edit the elements of each page with details of the project. For tips on effective presentation slides, follow the online resource at this link: http://www.chillibreeze.com/articles_various/top-10-examples-of-effective-slides-in-a-presentation.asp You may also wish to explore some popular models at http://slideshare.net , e.g. http://www.slideshare.net/satyajeet_02/how-to-make-effective-presentation
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  • Documenting Wa (lawa) Plants and Herbs for Food and Medicine in awa mountains  

    1. 1. Documenting Wa (lawa) Plants and Herbs for Food and Medicine in Awa MountainsReport Authors: BAI Zhihong & CHEN XueliInstitution: Yunnan UniversityEmail: baiz@ynu.edu.cn
    2. 2. Aims and Objectives
    3. 3. • to document edible parts of plants and fruits in the natural habitats of the Wa people in China along the Sino- Myanmar border in digital format.• to incorporate the research process as well as research outcomes into the teaching of undergraduate and MA students and database construction at the University.• to build capacity by involving Wa women whose role in feeding their families and communities have rarely been acknowledged.• to raise awareness of the value of Wa local knowledge among university students, local government officials and ordinary villagers, especially those who have been misguided by an evolutionary paradigm and ethnocentric ideology.
    4. 4. MethodologyFocus-group interview In-depth interview Qualitative analysis
    5. 5. Implementationlocal healthcare officials fieldwork sites & map village healers patients classroom teaching
    6. 6. • Pre-fieldwork training, discussing topics & methods for data collection.• 12 students (5 MA) involved in different trips in 7 villages; 5 local doctors involved;• available plants were quite similar; yet differences were huge;• data collected is currently integrated into the teaching of undergraduate students in two courses: Anthropological Theories (for anthropology majors), and Anthropology and Modern Life (for non-anthropology majors) .
    7. 7. Outcomes
    8. 8. Expected outcomes• a colored booklet and CDs (in process);• add teaching and learning materials to Yunnan University library and the digital database of the research school (in process);• hopefully, used as ex-curriculum materials in primary schools and high schools in these three counties
    9. 9. Outcomes attained• a process of teaching and learning by participating into lived experiences and affirming LK during the data-collection process;• empowering students and strengthening confidence in traditional culture and LK in Wa communities to some degree;• enriching teaching resources in classrooms
    10. 10. Applications/Outputs
    11. 11. Classroom teaching• Anthropological Theories (anthro undergrad. majors) Structuralism: indigenous taxonomy Gender Studies: women’s role• Anthropology and Modern Life (non-anthro undergrad. majors) Structuralism: indigenous taxonomy Gender Studies: women’s role Anthro and Environment• Gender studies for anthro-major MA students
    12. 12. Fieldwork: coursework & in the field• Classroom teaching: Fieldwork methodology (both undergrad. & postgrad.)• In the field
    13. 13. Conclusions
    14. 14. • Getting foot in the village was an eye-opening experience; focusing on plants and herbs but• multiple fieldwork trips were essential;• our interest in LK and our interview itself raised awareness and promoted self-confidence among LK holders whether old or young;• shrinking bio-diversity due to mass production of cash crops was overwhelming;• further research was needed, in particular, to develop methodological strategies to overcome social constrains and data limitations;
    15. 15. • limited expertise in healing ailments;• traditional healers welcome us as patients/clients, but not researchers.• conflicting names and usages• ordinary villages who can be important LK holders;• language barrier and availability of Wa women
    16. 16. Recommendations
    17. 17. • Research ethics• Local transportation• Intoxication• Need qualitative research
    18. 18. References
    19. 19. Thank you!Report Authors: BAI Zhihong & CHEN XueliInstitution: Yunnan UniversityEmail: baiz@ynu.edu.cn

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