What makes audiences tick?

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Anne Torreggiani's presentation about arts attenders in the UK and The Audience Agency's new segmentation tool, Audience Spectrum. This presentation was delivered at the Arts Marketing Association Conference in Bristol on 23 July 2014.

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  • Understanding what motivates different people can help us engage a wide range of audiences
    Large scale analysis population. New insights about audience motivations and how they can shape our audience focused activity.
    Guidance on the insights from this research that can have a direct impact on the work they do for their organisations.
     
  • Firstly though, for those of you don’t know TAA, or haven’t worked with us for a while, I should just reintroduce TAA. And our RDs… here todyat
  • Background - Audience Spectrum new culture profiles
    Not all audiences are the same – the new segmentation seeks to help understand how to plan the offer and communicate it better

  • Observation…
    If you’re lucky you probably know how often they come, what they prefer to do (when with your organisation), you might know where they live and what they think of you.
    But do you know what they do elsewhere? Do you know why they do it
    Do you know what makes them tick?
    Personally, my preferences are for new writing and

  • For example… I love Theatre Complicite
  • But what really makes me tick these days is stuff that appeals to my family, and is easy to get to – so life stage, and catchment area are in the ascendance

  • So here’s a little test.
    For those of you anticipating a morning nap – hold on, there are prizes to be won!
  • Tie-breaker:
    What percentage of online referrals come from Google? 19.36%
    Closest wins!
  • Tie-breaker:
    What percentage of online referfals come from Google? 19.36%
    Closest wins!
  • Tie-breaker:
    What percentage of online referals come from Google? 19.36%
    Closest wins!
  • We’ve created Audience Spectrum to help you to engage audiences.
    It segments the population by their level of interest in different kinds of arts and museums experiences.
    So it can help you do 2 things: enhance segmentation of your own audience AND help you to find new groups of people with some potential to engage with what you do.
  • Taking Part / Mosaic
    Audience Finder datasets
    National panel survey
    Test cases
    Case Studies
    Ongoing test marketing
  • To re-cap… what are the new enhancements
  • To re-cap… what are the new enhancements
  • England and Wales
  • But the important thing is the differences in the strategies we need to use here…
    And we’ll see where they are and how they interact
  • Taking Part / Mosaic
    Audience Finder datasets
    National panel survey
    Test cases
    Case Studies
    Ongoing test marketing
  • Taking Part / Mosaic
    Audience Finder datasets
    National panel survey
    Test cases
    Case Studies
    Ongoing test marketing
  • 12.45
  • But if it’s tough to get data and make meaning of it, working collaboratively can really help.
    What’s new and important here is the aggregate data – the scale and scope of the exercise are what lends it new value – context, comparisons, norms and the chance to collaborate in understanding how we respond.
  • We’ll be working with you to encourage you to experiment and document…
    Interested in working with us on a case study, we’re inviting people now
  • Large chunk of the market-place…
    Max relationships -
  • But the important thing is the differences in the strategies we need to use here…
    And we’ll see where they are and how they interact
  • High low engagement but Kaleidoscope Creativity hold a special place for us in London… possibly our ‘future proofing’ and they are clearly not the low engaged for London…
  • For now, the people formerly known as the audience are pretty exclusively Super-engagers. Most likely to see out new channels, new offers. Most new models of engagement suit the enthusiasts – its their love of the new that leads them to our door in the first place. This is not to say that approaches like co-creation are not highly effective at attracting less engaged people – CPP is showing us hat they are. But it is is also showing us that we need to be proactive. So, we must make of this a virtue, drawing them further in to our mutual advantage
  • 1pm close….The plan should also show how an organisation will grow and/ or retain audiences over time.
    This Ansoff Matrix is not the only way to plan for these things – though an old favourite for many good reasons.

    Interestingly – digital engagement/ art and collections online – probably fit best in the product development quadrant and NOT the diversification where some organisations have tried to fix it. Streamed cine-casts are a notable exception.
  • What makes audiences tick?

    1. 1. What makes different audiences tick Anne Torreggiani Chief Executive AMA Conference 2014
    2. 2. Not-for-profit supporting 800 cultural organisations to understand, engage and grow audiences Advice & support, research & intelligence Give-and-gain model: sharing intelligence and good practice. Eg Audience Finder… Local – National - Local The Audience Agency…
    3. 3. Outline • Introduction: how well do we know our audiences? • Background: Audience Spectrum? • Findings: what makes different audiences tick? • Implications: how should we respond?
    4. 4. Population survey builds on new segmentation What we wanted to understand • How different are the drivers for each segment? • Who influences who, and how? • How is digital changing all this? • What strategies should we adapt/adopt? • Who are the people formerly known as…
    5. 5. How well do you know your audiences?
    6. 6. The Master and Margarita Theatre Complicite
    7. 7. Greenwich and Docklands International Festival Holkham Hall
    8. 8. Quiz 10 main questions Circle one from a multiple choice answer to each question. Feel free to collaborate… Answers at the end. Add up your score.
    9. 9. Questions 1-5 1. What is the most important motivation for arts attendance among the population? A) to be entertained B) to learn something new C) to relax 2. What % of the population say that they usually frequent venues they know? A) 23% B) 43% C) 63% 3. What % of the population say that they feel out of place at arts events? A) 14% B) 24% C) 44% 4. (A) What % of the population donate to the arts per year? A) 6% B) 16% C) 26% 4. (B) What % of the population donate to museums per year? A) 4% B) 14% C) 24% 4. (C) What % of highly engaged audiences donate to the arts per year? A) 11% B) 21% C) 31% 5. What % of the population has watched a stream or relay of a live arts performance in the last 5 years? A) 14% B) 24% C) 34%
    10. 10. Questions 6-10 6. What % of the population has ever accessed a museum or art collection online? A) 7% B) 17% C) 27% 7. What % of museum visitors always visit “for something to do with the family”? A) 5% B) 15% C) 25% 8. What % of the population say they recommend arts and cultural activities to others? A) 33% B) 63% C) 83% 9. What % of web-traffic to arts websites is referred by Facebook? A) 3% B) 23% C) 33% 10. (A) What % of the population say social media is important to the way they communicate? A) 29% B) 49% C) 69% 10. (B) What % of highly engaged people say social media is important to the way that they communicate? A) 25% B) 45% C) 65%
    11. 11. Answers 1. A – 91%(across the board) want to be entertained 2. B – 43% tend to venues they know 3. A – 14% people feel uncomfortable 4a. A - 6% donate to arts 4b. B - 14% to museums 4c. A - 11% highly engaged 5. A - 14% watched live stream 6. B - 17% collection online 7. C - 25% always visit museums as a family activity 8. B – 63% say they recommend arts activity 9. A – 3% referrals are from Facebook 10a.A – 28% social media important 10b.A - 25% highly engaged
    12. 12. • 50% discount CultureHive GROW programme New intensive course to hone strategic audience development skills (worth £125) • Box of Pick & Mix Something for everyone…
    13. 13. A spectrum of audiences
    14. 14. A new segmentation using national data to understand differences between audiences – actual and potential From Audience Finder, the England-wide insight-sharing programme
    15. 15. Metroculturals Commuterland Culturebuffs Experience Seekers Dormitory Dependables Trips & Treats Home & Heritage Up Our Street Facebook Families Kaleidoscope Creativity Heydays A segmentation of the UK population based on people’s cultural habits and preferences. 10 distinct profiles, linked to household and located by postcode. Helps us understand spectrum of audiences, plan to meet needs, and find new ones.
    16. 16. A ‘living’ model Populationsurvey AudienceFinderData Practice AudienceSpectrum Taking Part Mosaic Box Office data Primary Research data Digital Analytics Panel survey Testing Case Studies
    17. 17. Innovations • Combines culture-specificity with geo-location (ie Arts Audience Insight meets Mosaic) • National picture of audiences and non-engagers • Museum relevant • Evolving and enriched using real data • Belongs to the sector, developed with the sector • Shaped by practice • Will be able to profile web-users • Works with AAI and Mosaic micro-segments
    18. 18. Find it here… • Detailed info, mapping, free to all • Benefit Audience Finder – in reports and tools • Data-profiling, Area Profiles, data-tagging available to all • Buy names, addresses and emails www.audiencefinder.org/spectrum
    19. 19. Metroculturals Commuterland Culturebuffs Experience Seekers High engagement 22% population, 60% of audiences Confident, enthusiastic, educated Habits and tastes vary Donate: 11% arts, 20% museums Donors: 14% £100+ arts (exclusively), 7% museums Digital: Heavy-users Volunteer: Leading, general 31%, 4% culture Participation: Highest
    20. 20. Dormitory Dependables Trips and Treats Home & Heritage (Kaleidoscope Creativity) Medium engagement 41% population, 30% of audiences Risk-averse, not culture-averse Location and lifestage are critical Donate: 4% arts, 14% museums Donors: 5% £100+ arts, 1% museums Digital: Moderate – light, varies lifestage Volunteer: Some, general 21%, culture 1% Participation: Some, varies
    21. 21. Kaleidoscope Creativity Up Our Street Facebook Families Heydays Less engagement 37% population, 10% of audiences Do engage, but low proportions Lack of interest AND lack of resources Donate: 4% arts, 10% museums Donors: 1% £100+ arts, 0% museums Digital: Moderate – light, varies lifestage Volunteer: Some, general 17%, culture 0% Participation: Low
    22. 22. Q&A
    23. 23. What makes different segments tick? Benefits and preferences
    24. 24. Benefits explored through 1st panel survey Populationsurvey AudienceFinderData Practice AudienceSpectrum Taking Part New level of access Mosaic Box Office data Primary Research data Digital Analytics Panel survey Testing Case Studies
    25. 25. Benefits • Entertainment and social are hygiene factors – everyone wants them • Circa 1/3 all segments want to learn something new • Highly engaged are looking for much more – reputation, stimulation • They will do more homework as a result • Lower engaged groups are more likely to want to relax • Overall, all segments are put off by the idea of “unconventional”, especially later life-stage groups
    26. 26. Programme Preferences – similarities & differences “Everyman” activities include • At least 30% of each segment go to musicals • At least 40% of each segment go to film • At least 30% of each segment go to collections museums and galleries Distinctive habits • “Contemporary” audiences - super-engagers with eclectic tastes • Panto a preference for medium and less-engaged • Higher-engaged more like to visit museums for specific interest • Participation varies between segments, highly engaged dominating
    27. 27. Barriers? • Only 27% of least engaged think the “arts is not for me” • Only 17% least engaged say they don’t feel welcome • All 10 segments cite “lack of time” as the main barrier to attendance • Is inertia or indifference the biggest barrier? • And if so…
    28. 28. Who influences who? How?
    29. 29. Drivers explored through 1st panel survey Populationsurvey AudienceFinderData Practice AudienceSpectrum Taking Part Mosaic Box Office data Primary Research data Digital Analytics Panel survey Testing Case Studies
    30. 30. Who influences who? • All segments most influenced by people they know • No clear “maven” segments, • but highly engaged recommend more, influenced by networks • Highly engaged influenced by professional reviews • But also confident in own opinions • Overall influence of online ratings claimed circa 60% • Venue provided information still important circa 60%, especially important to knowledgeable, highly engaged • Children influence 25% families • Curatorial recommendation rated low • Google (20%) then Facebook (3%) key referrals
    31. 31. How does digital change things?
    32. 32. Digital explored throughout Populationsurvey AudienceFinderData Practice AudienceSpectrum Taking Part Mosaic Box Office data Primary Research data Digital Analytics Hitwise Panel survey Testing Case Studies
    33. 33. Digital habits • Everyone uses the internet • Everyone says they rely on it more now than 5 years ago • In all segments, less that 1% have no access, never browse • Life stage makes a difference to how • Younger – including less engaged - groups use more social media • Only small numbers say social media is important communication • Most people prefer online ticketing • Highly engaged, urban groups are tech fanatics, using it to organise their lives, consume media (good targets for apps)
    34. 34. Digital engagement • More people are watching live-streamed performances than going to opera • Difference is more marked outside urban centres • Highly engaged, urban - born digital art/ art online • Engagement with online collections matches profile of onsite audiences… Some change • Significant numbers using online information to extend their experience, eg post-experience
    35. 35. Digital for decision-making • All agree, use web to find out more • 2/3 use interest to plan total visits • 60% say replaced print communication • 40% say it doesn’t! • All segments say they do more cultural activity because they have better online access to information • Different segments want different kinds of information for reassurance
    36. 36. Digital for influencing • Overwhelmingly, people still prefer face-to-face or phone to suggest activities • Email second preference • However, around 30% younger audiences use social media to recommend and to arrange cultural activities
    37. 37. Overview
    38. 38. More Engaged Open to range of experiences Entertainment and social matter “Challenge”/ “Reputation” More active seekers More likely to instigate activities Driven by a personal passion Recommend to others more frequently Confident navigators Less Engaged Shorter menu Entertainment and social matter “Relax” Passive intenders Need clearer match to benefits
    39. 39. Rural/ Suburban Audiences Traditional tastes Range of artforms Highly social More influenced by companions Frequency affected by access Urban Audiences Eclectic tastes (style) Highly-engaged – contemporary Interested in topicality Don’t mind attending alone Frequent and active
    40. 40. With children 25% influenced by children’s choices 25% attend museums as a family People with younger children do less Culture offer less part of social life How to rekindle relationships
    41. 41. Implications?
    42. 42. New strategies
    43. 43. Strategies developed through testing Populationsurvey AudienceFinderData Practice AudienceSpectrum Taking Part Mosaic Box Office data Primary Research data Digital Analytics Panel survey Testing Case Studies
    44. 44. Superengagers & Highly engaged Speak to multiple benefits Maximise relationships Income, advocacy Content and involvement Digital revolution starts here
    45. 45. Medium engaged Increase supply - touring and streaming Focus on lowering practical barriers Manage risk Connect through the familiar Iconic programme Focus on social benefits Different kind of loyalty
    46. 46. Less engaged Pro-active invitation to overcome inertia Different offer, different place Get closer More involvement Co-creation, special practice Creative People & Places Digital a qualified opportunity
    47. 47. Who ARE the people formerly known as?
    48. 48. Enlist the Super-engagers Donors Crowd-funders Digital innovators Volunteers Participants Innovators Influencers Pioneers… where they go, others follow
    49. 49. Retaining, growing and developing audiences? Ansoff matrix: New and existing audiences New digital content, new channels, new models Love Experiment Test! Caution Homework! Make friends
    50. 50. Thanks Anne.torreggiani@theaudienceagency.org www.theaudienceagency.org www.audiencefinder.org www.culturehive.org 020 7407 4625

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