Task 3

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Task 3

  1. 1. Task 3 Gather Data through formal processes
  2. 2. <ul><li>Prepare a presentation or paper discussing the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Tips for ensuring survey sampling is correct </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid double-barreled questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep the questions short </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t antagonize your respondents </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Limit open-ended questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t lead with responses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider the respondents’ attention span </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Prepare a presentation or paper discussing the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Tips for creating questionnaires </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Understand the reasons and background for your survey. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You need to consider your audience before you can develop questions and format your survey. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Determining your sample size will help you decide which type of survey to use. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Define your survey’s mission </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The key to a successful survey is ensuring that your questions are concise, easy-to understand and give you valid and reliable information. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Prepare a presentation or paper discussing the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Tips for interviewing groups </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep the number of questions to five to six. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask open-ended questions; avoid simple yes or no questions. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask the questions in a logical order, moving from the general to the specific. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use probes, such as: “Does anyone feel differently?” or “Are there any other points of view?” </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Prepare a presentation or paper discussing the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Tips for interviewing groups </li></ul><ul><li>Conducting the Interview </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Welcome the group and give an overview of the interview, including its purpose and process. Ask participants to speak one at a time and note that it’s fine for people to disagree. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tell participants how the information from the interview will be used and whether they could be identifiable in any products. Let them know that individual comments will be confidential. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage participants to share their points of view even when they’re different. Tell the group there are no right or wrong answers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be clear about which questions are ones you want answered by everyone and which ones can be answered by anyone wants to speak. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider including activities to promote discussion and deeper thinking, such as starting with a force-field analysis before discussing the issue. </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Prepare a presentation or paper discussing the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Data bias _ particularly how easy it is to manipulate data analysis to suit a particular goal – including ways to control bias when gathering data through formal processes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make sure that your terminology is not emotive or directional </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be aware of the context your questions are set in </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Questions should be used purposely to achieve well-defined goals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do not load your questions with non-neutral wording eg. “ Are you in favor of educational institution requiring that all lecturers join a union, thus raising educational costs?” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do not word your questions so they unduly influence responses eg. “ do you think the US was right or wrong in sending American troops to stop the Communist Invasion of South Korea?” </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Prepare a presentation or paper discussing the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Data bias-Open ended questions-pros </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Puts interviewee at ease </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides rich detail </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reveals avenues of further questioning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allows more spontaneity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Easier for an unprepared interviewer </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Prepare a presentation or paper discussing the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Data bias-Open ended questions-cons </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Too much irrelevant detail </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May lose control of the interview </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lengthy answers that do not give much useful information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interviewer may seem unprepared </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May give impression of fishing expedition </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Prepare a presentation or paper discussing the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Data bias-Closed question-pros </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Save time easy to compare interviews </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Get to the point </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep control of the interview </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cover lots of ground quickly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Get relevant data </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Prepare a presentation or paper discussing the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Data bias-Closed questions-cons </li></ul><ul><ul><li>An interviewer who uses this method of questioning will only get their own opinion confirmed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Boring for the interviewee </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fails in obtaining rich detail </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Miss the main ideas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>May fail to build rapport between the interviewer and the interviewee </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>Prepare a presentation or paper discussing the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Use Closed-ended questions rather than Open-ended ones </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most questionnaires rely on questions with a fixed number of response categories from which respondents select their answers. These are useful because the respondents know clearly the purpose of the question and are limited to a set of choices where one answer is right for them.   </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>An open-ended question is a written response. For example: &quot;If you do not want a company picnic, please explain why&quot;. If there are an excessive number of written response questions, it reduces the quality and attention the respondents give to the answers.  </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>Prepare a presentation or paper discussing the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Tips for writing questions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Thoroughly research your subject </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid double-barreled questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be relevant </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Write a short questionnaire. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>above all. your questionnaire should be as short as possible. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use simple words </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Start with interesting questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Don't write leading questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Put your questions in a logical order. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>The issues raised in one question can influence how people think about subsequent questions. </li></ul></ul></ul>

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