Attack toolkit webinar 9-7-11

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This is a slide show from an interactive training designed for tobacco control advocates and enthusiasts working with youth and young adults. In the training, we reviewed content and navigation of the ATTACK Toolkit. With the help from Jeff Jordan, President and Founder of Rescue Social Change Group, we highlighted how Social Branding strategy promotes tobacco-free lifestyles.

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Attack toolkit webinar 9-7-11

  1. 1. ATTACK Toolkit Webinar on Social Branding© 9-7-11 www.ATTACKtobacco.net
  2. 2. ATTACK Toolkit OverviewNavigating ToolkitSocial Branding© www.ATTACKtobacco.net
  3. 3. Social Branding© Jeff Jordan, M.A. President/FounderRescue Social Change Group www.ATTACKtobacco.net
  4. 4. COMMERCIAL MARKETING ! SOCIALMARKETING BAR AND CLUB PROMOTIONS Sepe E, Glantz, SA. Bar and club tobacco promotions in the alternative press: targeting young adults. Am J Public Health. 2002 Jan;92(1):75-8.
  5. 5. Departmentof Medicine “The field representatives…will be recruited from within the local scene, thus they will acquire the respect and trust of these “trend-setters.” They will speak their language, dress their dress, and walk their walk….Once our relationship is solidified with the nightclub owners, management, and staff, we will begin to subtly train the employees on how to influence smokers…” KBA for RJR, 1996, 516619663/9766
  6. 6. SEGMENTATION SEGMENTATIONThe process of classifying a EXAMPLEmarket into distinct segmentsthat behave in similar ways or Play Video: “MOUNTAIN DEW”have similar needs.
  7. 7. San Diego Young Adult Subcultures Four Distinct 10% Subcultures Were 17% Identified Hipsters 21% Urban Partiers 52% LGBTSmoking by Subculture Hipsters and Smoking Attitudes Subculture Size Current Smoking Compared to the other bar subcultures: Regular Smoking 52% 50% • Hipsters significantly less likely to support action against tobacco industry 38% 30% 32% • 28% of Hipsters, 35% of others 29% 21% • Hipsters equally agree SHS dangerous 19% 15% 17% 13% • 58% agreement among both Hipsters and others 10% • Hipsters equally agree smoking “useful” Urban Hipster Pop LGBT • 33% of Hipsters, 35% of others agree
  8. 8. Social Concern & Risk Behaviors Social Concern and Risk Behaviors SD YA Social Concern and Reported Smoking Behavior (p<.001) 100% 80% 84% 75% 60% 66% 56% 52% 40% 35% 20% 20% 0% 1% 1-3 4-6 7-9 10-12 13-15 16-18 19-21 22-25 Center for Tobacco Control Research & Education UCSFYOUNG ADULT SMOKING IN BARS CA ME NM OKStatewide YA 18.0 25.0 25.4 27.0Prevalence (BRFSS)Current Smoking 56.3 51.5 46.8 57.2Young Adult Bar-GoersRegular Smoking 28.2 19.4 21.0 34.0(20+ Days in Past 30)SOCIAL BRANDING ®A behavioral change strategythat utilizes certain commercialmarketing tactics to change thesocial image associated withcertain behaviors within specificpeer group populations.
  9. 9. How is Social BrandingDifferent?• Meaningful Segmentation• Direct Experience Vs. Information• Social Image & Identity vs. Knowledge• Diffusion of Innovations• Selective Empowerment• Cultural Authenticity & Relevance
  10. 10. How is Social Branding Different? • Meaningful Segmentation COMMUNE • Direct Experience Vs. Information • Social Image & Identity vs. Knowledge Play Video: “COMMUNE” • Diffusion of Innovations • Selective Empowerment • Cultural Authenticity & Relevance Center for Tobacco Center for Tobacco Control Research & Control Research & Education UCSF Education UCSFMETHODS 50%• Series of cross sectional surveys using randomized venue-based 40% sampling • Enumerated all Hipster bars and clubs and most popular nights EXPOSURE for Hipsters 30% • Randomly selected venues and times for intercept survey• Cross sectional surveys at four time points: 20% • Baseline N=1,105 collected over 14 weeks • FU1 (10m) N=1,174 • FU2 – collected in three parts, with a goal of 1200 surveys total 10% over the year: part1 (22m) N=277, part 2 (28m) N=507, part 3 N=500• Respondents age 18-26 present in or around bars at randomly Total Sample p <.05 0% selected time were eligible to participate Hipsters p <.1 Baseline 10 Months 22 Months 28 Months 32 Months SC Hipster p <.1 n = 1,105 n = 1,174 n = 277 n = 507 n = 500
  11. 11. Center for Tobacco Center for Tobacco Control Research & Control Research & Education UCSF Education UCSF 30% 80% 24% 70% “Likes” 18% CURRENT 60%Campaign 12% SMOKING Total Sample (p=0.003, 50% OR=0.71 95% CI [0.57, 0.89]) Hipsters (p=0.001, OR=0.62 6% 95% CI [0.47, 0.82]) 40% SC Hipsters (p=0.006, OR=0.43 [0.23, 0.79]) Total Sample p <.01 0% Total Sample 30% Hipsters p <.05 Baseline 10 Months 22 Months 28 Months 32 Months Hipsters Baseline 10 Months 22 Months 28 Months 32 Months SC Hipster p <.05 n = 1,105 n = 1,174 n = 277 n = 507 n = 500 SC Hipster n = 1,105 n = 1,174 n = 277 n = 507 n = 500 Center for Tobacco Center for Tobacco Control Research & Control Research & Education UCSF Education UCSF 80% FINDINGS 75% • Campaign awareness increasing over time • Awareness and Liking highest among the target audience (Hipsters with high social concern) BINGE 70% • Increasing association between Commune and HipstersDRINKING 65% • over time, particularly among Socially Concerned Hipsters Increasing association between Commune and anti- tobacco themes over time 60% • Significant decrease in Current smoking from 56% at baseline to 49% at FU2 (p<0.01) Total Sample p <.001 Hipsters p <.001 55% Baseline 10 Months 22 Months 28 Months 32 Months • Unexpected significant decrease in binge drinking in past n = 1,105 n = 1,174 n = 277 n = 507 n = 500 month from 79% at baseline to 69% at 28m (p<0.001) Discussion & QuestionsJeff Jordan, MAjeff@rescuescg.com RescueSCG.com
  12. 12. Resources• Rescue Social Change Group www.rescuescg.com• ATTACK Toolkit www.ATTACKtobacco.net www.ATTACKtobacco.net
  13. 13. Kimberly Bankston-Leeklee@sacbreathe.org916-444-5900 x211Alex Tyannikovatyannikov@sacbreathe.org916-444-5900 x206ATTACK Toolkit Project – www.ATTACKtobacco.netBreathe California of Sacramento-Emigrant TrailsSacramento, CAwww.SacBreathe.org www.ATTACKtobacco.net

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