Spermatogenesis

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  • Aboral ectoderm Oral Ectoderm Endoderm Secondary ectoderm Skeletogenic cell Coelom
  • Spermatogenesis

    1. 1. Fate maps
    2. 2. Piebaldism due to mutation in KIT gene
    3. 3. TS of Seminiferous tubule
    4. 4. Spermiation
    5. 5. Human sperm
    6. 6. Human sperm in further detail
    7. 7. Motile apparatus of sperm
    8. 8. Acrosome formation
    9. 9. Changes in the No of germ cells in the human ovary
    10. 10. Growth of oocyte in frog
    11. 11. Schematic representation of Xenopus oocyte maturation
    12. 12. Oocyte in maturing stages
    13. 13. Cortical action in sea urchin
    14. 14. Cortical action in man
    15. 15. Fusion of egg and sperm membranes in sea urchin and mouse
    16. 16. Acrosome reaction in sea urchin egg
    17. 17. Events leading to the formation of fertilization envelop and the hyaline layer
    18. 18. Acrosome reaction in mammals
    19. 19. Formation of fertilization envelope
    20. 20. Wave of calcium release across sea urchin egg during fertilization
    21. 21. Comparison of Spermatogenesis and Oogenesis
    22. 22. Time line for the fertilization of sea urchin egg
    23. 23. Resting potential and Fertilization potential
    24. 24. Cleavage• Cleavage is a series of rapid mitotic divisions whereby the enormous volume of egg cytoplasm is divided into numerous smaller nucleated cells. These cleavage stages are called blastomeres. One consequence of this rapid division is that the ratio to cytoplasmic to nuclear volume gets increasingly smaller as cleavage progresses. The rate of cell division and the placement of blastomeres with respect to one another is completely under the control of proteins and mRNAs stored in the oocyte of the mother
    25. 25. Cell cycle of somatic and early blastomeres
    26. 26. Role microtubules and microfilamenta in cell division
    27. 27. Summary of Holoblastic and meroblastic cleavages
    28. 28. Holoblastic cleavage in sea cucumber
    29. 29. Cleavage in sea urchin
    30. 30. Cytoplasmic rearranement
    31. 31. Fate map of frog
    32. 32. Cleavage of a frog egg
    33. 33. Spiral cleavage in molluscs
    34. 34. Right and Left handed coiling in snail
    35. 35. Bilateral cleavage in tunicates
    36. 36. Radial and rotational cleavage, a comparison
    37. 37. Development of human embryo from fertilization to implantation
    38. 38. Compaction, cell junction formation and cavitation
    39. 39. Hatching of blastocyst from zona pellucida
    40. 40. Timing of human monozygotic twinning with relation to extraembryonic membranes
    41. 41. • Fate maps of different animals
    42. 42. Fate map of Sea urchin
    43. 43. Fate map of a tunicate
    44. 44. Formation of syncytial cables
    45. 45. Fate map of Fish
    46. 46. Sea urchin development
    47. 47. Discoidal Meroblastic cleavage
    48. 48. Meroblastic cleavage in Zebra fish
    49. 49. Overview of early development of selected animals
    50. 50. Blastula of Zebra fish
    51. 51. Cleavage of frog egg
    52. 52. fertilized egg of frog (cortical rotation) if we allow rotation the larva is normal, if rotation is inhibited with UVirradiation the embryo is featureless and vetralized if we treat the embryo with heavy water it willenhance microtubule formation resulting into the formation of cyclopean eye and over developed sucker and if we impose second rotation with centrifugation the result is conjoined twin
    53. 53. Ingression of primary mesenchyme cells
    54. 54. Axis formation in chick
    55. 55. Invagination of the vegetal plate
    56. 56. Archenteron formation in sea urchin
    57. 57. Gastrulation in Zebra Fish
    58. 58. Fate map of frog
    59. 59. Asymmertry of amphibian egg
    60. 60. Organization of secondary axis by dorsal blastopore tissue
    61. 61. Exp of Nieuwkoop and Nakamura
    62. 62. Cell movements during frog gartrulation
    63. 63. Cell movement during frog gastrulation
    64. 64. Epiboly of ectoderm
    65. 65. Cell movement during gastrulation in Xenopus
    66. 66. Early movements of frog gastrulation
    67. 67. Gastrulation• It is the process of highly integrated cell and tissue movements and their rearrangements so as to develop a three layered embryo composed of ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm.
    68. 68. Types of cell movements
    69. 69. Cell movement in embryo of chick
    70. 70. Formation of blastoderm in chick
    71. 71. Formation of two laryered blastoderm in chick
    72. 72. Migration of endodermal and mesodermal cells through the primitive streak
    73. 73. Cell movement of P/Streak
    74. 74. First week of human development
    75. 75. Eye Development

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