NOAA Satellite Partnerships That Matter

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2011 American Astronautical Society Robert H. Goddard Memorial Symposium--Charles Baker, NOAA

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  • Jason-2
  • See Backup Chart 26 for Cospas-SARSAT Flyout
  • NOAA Satellite Partnerships That Matter

    1. 1. NOAA Satellite Partnerships that Matter 49 th AAS Robert H. Goddard Memorial Symposium March 31, 2011 Charles S. Baker Deputy Assistant Administrator for Satellite and Information Services National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    2. 2. NOAA-NASA Partnership: Beginnings <ul><li>TRIOS-1 launched April 1, 1960. </li></ul><ul><li>In May 1961, President Kennedy requested $53 million for “a satellite system for worldwide weather observation. Such a system will be of inestimable commercial and scientific value, and the information it provides will be made freely available to all the nations of the world.” </li></ul><ul><li>In January 1962, Commerce and NASA signed an agreement outlining the responsibilities of each agency. </li></ul>
    3. 3. NOAA-NASA Partnership: Five Decades of Success <ul><li>38 POES satellites have flown – 5 are flying today </li></ul><ul><li>15 GOES Satellites have flown – 5 are flying today </li></ul><ul><li>NOAA also uses data from NASA’s own satellites </li></ul>* NOAA-19 Launched February 6, 2009 GOES-15 Launched May 4, 2010
    4. 4. NOAA-NASA Partnership: Future <ul><li>GOES – R </li></ul>JPSS
    5. 5. NOAA-EUMETSAT Partnership <ul><li>Polar-orbiting satellites </li></ul><ul><ul><li>EUMETSAT flies in morning orbit; NOAA flies in afternoon orbit; exchange of all data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NOAA instruments fly on EUMETSAT satellites; EUMETSAT instruments fly on NOAA satellites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The benefits: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cost savings on both sides </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Common technology </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Common data for weather, climate, and oceans </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Geostationary satellites </li></ul><ul><ul><li>EUMETSAT and NOAA exchange GOES and METEOSAT data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Satellite backup agreement </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. US-European Partnership: Jason
    7. 7. NOAA Partnerships: International Organizations
    8. 8. NOAA-CNES Partnership: Data Collection <ul><li>Thirty year cooperation with French space agency (CNES) </li></ul><ul><li>CNES-built Argos data collection systems fly on NOAA and other satellites </li></ul><ul><li>Relays in situ data from sources such as climate stations, stream gauges, tide gauges, moored ocean buoys, drifting floats, ships, birds, fish, marine mammals, and land animals </li></ul><ul><li>Worldwide coverage </li></ul><ul><li>Able to locate the transmission with an accuracy of 150 meters </li></ul>
    9. 9. NOAA Search and Rescue Partnership <ul><li>Canada and France provide NOAA and EUMETSAT instruments as part of globally coordinated system with Russia </li></ul><ul><li>Accurate, timely, reliable distress alert location data to help search and rescue authorities </li></ul><ul><li>Over 28,000 rescues since inception in 1982, including the rescue of Abby Sunderland (shown below) </li></ul>

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