Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Universal design for museum programs (GBMER workshop)

645 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Universal design for museum programs (GBMER workshop)

  1. 1. Universal Design Nora Nagle & Anna Lindgren-Streicher Museum of Science, Boston GBMER 1/21/14
  2. 2. Inclusion in museums CAISE inquiry group framework • Physical inclusion • Cognitive inclusion • Social inclusion
  3. 3. Physical inclusion Defining universal design The design of products and environments to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design. Center for Universal Design North Carolina State University
  4. 4. Physical inclusion Principles of universal design • • • • • • • Equitable use Flexibility in use Simple and intuitive Perceptible information Tolerance for error Low physical effort Size and space for approach and use Copyright © 1997 NC State University, The Center for Universal Design
  5. 5. Cognitive inclusion Universal design for learning • Recognition learning: multiple, flexible methods of presentation. • Strategic learning: multiple, flexible methods of expression and apprenticeship. • Affective learning: multiple, flexible options for engagement. (Rose and Meyer, 2002) Photo by Emily Maletz
  6. 6. Inclusion in museums • Museums are places where design is used to facilitate learning • Museums offer the possibility of multi-sensory learning activities • Museums provide groups of visitors with the opportunity to learn through conversations Photo by Emily Maletz
  7. 7. Introduction to the Universal Design Guidelines Photo © Michael Malyszko
  8. 8. Three Main Concepts Three main ideas can be used by museum educators while developing and implementing programs. 1. Repeat and reinforce main ideas 2. Multiple entry points / ways of engagement 3. Physical and sensory access
  9. 9. The Three Main Concepts 1. Repeat and reinforce main ideas 2. Multiple entry points / ways of engagement 3. Physical and sensory access
  10. 10. Why repeat and reinforce main ideas? • Learners have different preferences for receiving information: – Audial – Tactile – Visual • Helpful for those with different attention spans or short-term memory – Can relate to a disability or context of the situation
  11. 11. Considerations for Developing a Program • Explicitly state and focus on the main idea. • Break down the program into distinct pieces. • Be explicit about this breakdown.
  12. 12. Designing Props and Materials • All information (visual, aural, and tactile) should support one another. • Have hands-on elements that can be passed around to reinforce main ideas. Photo by Emily Maletz
  13. 13. Delivering your Presentation • Repeat key ideas. • Use images and text for emphasis. • Check in with the audience along the way. • Next level: Offer opportunities to preview materials before the program. Photo by Emily Maletz
  14. 14. Repeat and Reinforce Wrap-Up • Learners have different preferences for receiving information: – Audial – Tactile – Visual • Helpful for those with different attention spans or short-term memory. – Can relate to a disability or context of the situation
  15. 15. The Three Main Concepts 1. Repeat and reinforce main ideas 2. Multiple entry points / ways of engagement 3. Physical and sensory access
  16. 16. Why make multiple entry points and multiple ways of engagement available? • Different levels of content knowledge and personal experiences • Gives a wide range of visitors an avenue for understanding • Multiple examples provide visitors ways to connect to the content
  17. 17. Developing a program • Connect to a range of prior experiences • Make it fun and engaging for all learners • Consider multiple analogies for the same idea • Use examples and non-examples • Build multiple layers into the program
  18. 18. Developing a program
  19. 19. Multiple Entry Point and Engagement • Different levels of content knowledge and personal experiences • Gives a wide range of visitors an avenue for understanding • Multiple examples provide visitors ways to connect to the content
  20. 20. The Three Main Concepts 1. Repeat and reinforce main ideas 2. Multiple entry points / ways of engagement 3. Physical and sensory access
  21. 21. Why provide physical and sensory access? • People are diverse in their abilities: – How they can navigate an area – How much they can hear & see – How much they can sit or stand
  22. 22. Designing Props and Materials • Large and high-contrast text and images • Caption video • Use color • Tactile models • Next level: Provide handouts
  23. 23. Set Up and Prep • Good visibility of presenter’s face • Good visibility of materials on cart • Don’t block your slides / demos • Next level: Consider available seating • Next level: ASL interpreter
  24. 24. Delivering your Presentation • • • • Announce accessibility options Encourage all learners to participate Include pauses for processing ideas Provide auditory descriptions
  25. 25. Contact & Credits Nora Nagle nnagle@mos.org Anna Lindgren-Streicher alstreicher@mos.org Photo/Photos on slides 6, 7, 13, 14, 20, and 27 by Emily Maletz Graphic Design for the Nanoscale Informal Science Education (NISE) Network. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Award #0940143

×