Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Tour de France - The grand depart

743 views

Published on

Jill Gough and Craig Taylor’s presentation on the planning and delivery of the Grand Depart of the Tour de France 2014 – Wednesday 27th September 2017.

Published in: Education
  • Login to see the comments

  • Be the first to like this

Tour de France - The grand depart

  1. 1. Tour de France 2014 Presentation to:- Association of Project Managers Wednesday 27 September 2017
  2. 2. Three Inspirational Days Presented by: Jill Gough & Craig Taylor
  3. 3. Funding • Total Budget £27m • Local authorities - combined contribution of £11m • Government - up to £10 million available – Managed through the not-for-profit company TdFHUB2014 Ltd to co- ordinate planning for stages 1 and 2 and stage 3 up to the M25. • Transport for London - contributing £6m – To meet the costs associated with Stage 3. • Cost transparency – Information about these costs is in the public domain. TDFHUB2014 will account for its budget and report progress publicly.
  4. 4. 05 July 2014: Stage 1 Start: Leeds Finish: Harrogate • 127 miles • 205 kilometres • 17,000 metres of barriers • 3,800 stewards • 2,000 route Tour Makers
  5. 5. Start: York Finish: Sheffield • 128 miles • 207 kilometres • 34,000 metres of barrier • 4,500 stewards • 2,500 route Tour Makers 06 July 2014: Stage 2
  6. 6. Stage 3 • Transport for London (TfL) led • Appointment of event management company – Innovision • Outside GLA – Essex and Cambridge • Challenges around getting the riders to the start for Stage 3 and out of the country post the race
  7. 7. Scale of the Event Tour de France ‘Machine’ 4,500 people including: 198 riders (22 teams x 9)  1450 hotel beds reserved every day  10 emergency doctors and 6 ambulances  47 police motor cyclists  2,000 journalists  190 countries broadcasts  3.5 billion viewers  133 million internet pages viewed for 2012 race  Over 40 partners, mostly commercial  180 vehicles in the Caravan  15 million gifts handed out  4.8 million spectators on route
  8. 8. The Convoy
  9. 9. Facts and Figures The Reality  Economic benefit £128million  Over 70 km of bunting – 23,500 knitted jersey's  Over 25 hours of live TV coverage  Over 100 km of barriers and fencing (M1 Cambridge to London)  13,000 steward traffic and event safety  One shop sold a years worth of ice cream  1 million visits to www.letouryorkshire.com  Over 600 miles of parking restrictions  Upto 100 agencies and partners  1 million spectators at starts and finishes and spectator hubs  Upto 10,000 tour makers  Leeds station saw 243,000 people through it  2,225 performances as part of the cultural festival  Signals boosted by two wifi tractors  Traffic in London was 15-20% lower than a usual Monday  Groundwork for future regional joint working  Community cohesion strengthened
  10. 10. Programme Office Set-up
  11. 11. Our Purpose  To provide embedded programme management and procurement expertise to support the event  Co-ordinate planning for Stages 1 and 2 in Yorkshire  Work with Transport for London to support planning for Stage 3  To fill the gaps
  12. 12. Resources Applied  PMO Team appointed September 2013  Seconded into the company  Small but effective team  3 FTE Programme Resources  1 FTE Procurement Resource
  13. 13. Key Challenges  Delivery timescales 40 weeks and counting…..  Maintaining a single version of the truth  Applying appropriate governance  Delivering effective reporting  Engaging Geographically Dispersed Stakeholders  Driving collaboration on a regional scale never seen before  Effective Management of risk and issues  The scale of event support resources required
  14. 14. Baselining the preparation status  Assessment of current governance arrangements  Engagement with stakeholders to establish as is position and the quantum of work required  Best practice download from London Olympics delivery team  Review from TDFHub’s subject matter experts  Uk sport acting as a best practice facilitator
  15. 15. Governance Approach
  16. 16. Governance Overview
  17. 17. Local Authority Delivery The role of Leeds City Council: • Hosts to Grand Depart • Lead Local Authority – Event Organiser designation – Funding and contractual arrangements with other LA’s • Lead role in finance and procurement – Event cancellation insurance • TdFHUB support and delivery
  18. 18. Integrated Programme Schedule and Reporting
  19. 19. Timeline
  20. 20. Reporting • Dashboard – Planning – Operational • Key theme “Managing by exception” • Event time – Daily Rhythm – Sitreps • A periodic report of the current situation
  21. 21. Dashboard – Planning Phase
  22. 22. Dashboard – Operational Phase
  23. 23. Event Time - Daily Rhythm Situation Report received by Gold Command twice daily @ 6:30 for morning daily conference call (7:00) and @ 18:30 for evening daily conference call (19:00 ) – 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th July ALLPARTNERSAND STAKEHOLDERS Thematic Situation Reports to C3 by 6:00 and 18:00 daily - 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th July Secretariat writes consolidated Situation Report by 6:30 and 18:30 daily to send to Gold - 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th July Central logging system Hourly Reports
  24. 24. SITUATION REPORTING (SITREP) • To provide Gold commanders with key information and general situational awareness to enable strategic decision making for the event Reporting on • Overall Assessment and Critical/Key Issues, on Stages 1, 2 and 3 by functional area • Local Authority reports – including readiness status, crowd management, exception reporting • ASO issues, Weather, Crowd predictions & Dignitary management
  25. 25. Event Time - Issue Management • Live issues log during the event, reviewed hourly
  26. 26. Event Time - Lessons Learned • Issues and look ahead prepared at the end of each day • Based around feedback on functional areas • Reviewed on the evening gold call
  27. 27. Approach to Risk Management
  28. 28. Approach to Risk - Tools • Reporting Framework • Strategic risk register • Operational risk register • Operational Risk Management • Quantative Risk Assessment (QRA)
  29. 29. Risk Reporting Framework • Setting reporting tolerances: – Risk tolerance line – Which risks are to be reported on, new, changing risk status, those above the tolerance line. • Signed off and agreed by SRO’s • Presentation – Dashboard – Risk log – Risk Map
  30. 30. Strategic Risk Register • Managed by Programme office and owned by the Senior Responsible Owners Group (SRO’s) • Reported to and challenged by :- – Company Board – SRO’s – Audit Committee
  31. 31. Strategic risks - examples • Budget overspend • Public Disorder • Extremism / Protests • Terrorist attack • Inclement weather - flooding • Overcrowding • Cyber attack • Industrial action
  32. 32. Operational Risk Register • Managed by the programme office, owned by the Boards feeding into the SRO’s
  33. 33. Operational risk management - approach Operational Risk Register - Type, description, sources, consequences, controls, countermeasures, actions and owner Contractor / Partner Contingencies StandardOperating Procedures TdFHUB Contingencies Business as usual – briefings / training
  34. 34. Quantative Risk Assessment (QRA) • TDFHUB2014LtdContingencyplanasat16/4/2014- InConfidence Revisionsinblue Detail ofBid Potential Impact DateTitle Outline ofrisk RevEstCost Methodofquantification Calculation ofrevised risk exposure RevImpact Rev Probability Contingency bidstodate Contingency Approvals 1 Volunteerprogramme Additional volunteersrequireddue toincreasedattendance orparticular areaidentifiedascausingunforseencrowdmanagementissues 150 3 4 112.5 Unit cost of volunteer £40 Jul-14 2 CrowdManagement Venuesandlocationsunsuitable fordealingwithlarge crowds,includes supportforunfundedauthorities 648 4 3 324 35 ShowandEvent contractvariation Unit cost of volunteer £40 Jun-14 180 UnfundedAuthorities forHolme Mossplus Kirklees Stage 3 contingencyasguarantoroflastresort 700 4 5 665 TFL contract cost liability£1.84m Jun-14 UnforseenhighwayscostsforStage 3asTDFguarantoroflastresort 0 4 2 0 Omitted as not longer a risk Jun-14 5 RouteDressing Additional signage requiredimprovementtoviewerexperience 55 3 2 13.75 Based on signage per stage 5000 Jul-14 6 VIPS/Dignitaries LargerthanexpectednumbersofVIPs 25 2 2 6.25 Cost of transport, accommodation, tickets Jul-14 7 Change inIntelligence Additional resourcesrequiredtomanage situation 38 3 1 1.9 Localised need -Hard barriers 1 km barriers 800 per km. stewards 2045 per kmJul-14 Heatwave -increasedresource costs 15 3 2 3.75 Bowser and limited bottled water. Hire cost 165 for one bowser Jul-14 Floodingofkeypointsonroute 375 3 2 93.75 Rerouting infrastructure cost 7500 per km (2.1 m central procurement/400 km route plus uplift) Jul-14 9 Communications Servercapacityunderestimatedrequiringincrease 50 4 3 25 50k for press connectivity May-14 45 TestingandExercise StaffCosts 11 ITinfrastructure Additional resoucingconferencingandvideoconferencing 120 3 4 90 90 ANLoggingSystem plussetupfor commandroom Percentage of total cost . Increased costs to reflect additional IT and resource requirements Jun-14 12 Unknown Unknownunknowns 700 4 3 350 25% of contingency Jul-14 Totals 3628 2085.3 350 Probability Impact 5% 1 20% 25% 2 40% 50% 3 60% 75% 4 80% 95% 5 100% 10 3 4 8 May-14 May-14 Testingandexercise programme 52 2 5 49.4 Percentage of total cost . Increased costs to reflect additional IT and resource requirements Chris Scott plus additional staff Stage 3Contract Communicationstotravellers Requirementforadditonal resources 700 Extreme Weather Travel Demand Management Costs of communications input to mitigate the circumstances and inform the publci of the changes Note the Holme Moss bid will be funded via this risk heading3 3 350
  35. 35. QRA Risk Map RISK & CONTINGENCY MAP Highly Significant 5 Major 4 4b Stage 3 unforseen highways costs (0K) 2 Crowd Mgmnt (324K) 9 Server Capacity (25k) 12 Unknown (350K) 4a Stage 3 Contract (665K) VH Very High Risk - Control action must be taken immediately Moderate 3 7 Change in intelligence picture (1.9K) 5 Route dressing (13.75k) 8 Extreme weather (97.5K) 3 Travel demand mangement (350k) 1 Volunteer Programme (112.5k) 11 Infrastructure (50.25 k) H High Risk - control action must be a priority Minor 2 6 VIPs and Dignitaries (6.25k) 10 Testing and Exercise Programme (49.4 k) M Medium Risk - control action to be taken as a matter of routine Insignificant 1 L Low risk - No control action required, but will need to be monitored 1 2 3 4 5 Rare Unlikely Possible Probable Almost Certain KEY PROBABILITY
  36. 36. Programme Office - Lessons learned  Ensure you have an adequate timescale to deliver  Do not underestimate the scale of resources required to manage the process – you will always need more  Consider the IT system needed for sharing information between partners  Establish partnerships and relationships with partners as early as possible. Create a common purpose and strong vision  Governance is key – ensure the right people with the right capability and skills are utilised for boards. SRO Group enables integration across all stakeholders
  37. 37. Procurement
  38. 38. Central Procurement Overview: • Competitive tender process • WRG appointed as main contractor: – Traffic Management - CTM – Barriers, Fencing, Trackway -Eve – Stewarding and Marshalling – Show and Event – Medical Support and First Aid - Venture – Temporary Toilet Facilities – A1 – Signage and Wayfinding – Icon – Radio Communications - Delta
  39. 39. Central Procurement • Over 100km of Barriers • 2,500 Temporary Toilets • Over 1,200 individual combinations of wayfinding signage was designed and installed with over 70km of bunting. • 13,000 stewards - 3,800 Stewards were deployed on Stage 1 and 4500 on Stage 2 to ensure the event was kept safe and secure.
  40. 40. Central Procurement • The single most complex Radio Network the UK has ever seen was installed to ensure we have 100% coverage across both stages. • Over 30,000 cones and 7,500 signs were deployed to both ensure the race route is kept sterile whilst minimising disruption across the region. • Over 1,200 medical personnel were deployed across stages 1 and 2 in addition to the uplifted provision YAS are putting in place and what the ASO bring. This is the equivalent of setting up 11 A&E departments.
  41. 41. Other procurement activity • Massive range of procurement activity ranging from an event weather forecaster, buying whistles for the Tour Makers to procuring three planes to get the riders from the end of Stage 3 in London to the start of Stage 4 in France!
  42. 42. Readiness
  43. 43. Readiness Principles: • Succinct way of monitoring progress – Moving from ‘we will be’ to ‘we are • Way of monitoring risk - reputational • Identifying where resource is required • Emerging issues • Accountability and responsibility for readiness – Chief Executives sign off and ownership • RAG rating as basis
  44. 44. Readiness - timeline HUB – first readiness report by theme (April) LA – first return (May) Moderation , action plan and feedback (May) LA - second return (June) Moderation, action plan and feedback (June) SRO sign off (20th June) Final testing - working towards Green to Go (+21st June) Readiness declared (3rd July)
  45. 45. RAG ratings Rating Description Green Successful delivery of the project to time, cost and quality appears highly likely and there are no major outstanding issues that at this stage appear to threaten delivery significantly. Green/Amber Successful delivery appears probable; however, constant attention will be needed to ensure risks do not materialise into major issues threatening delivery. Amber Successful delivery appears feasible but significant issues already exist, requiring management attention. These appear resolvable at this stage and, if addressed promptly, should not present a cost/schedule overrun. Amber/Red Successful delivery of the project is in doubt, with major risks or issues apparent in a number of key areas. Urgent action is needed to ensure these are addressed, and whether resolution is feasible. Red Successful delivery of the project appears to be unachievable. There are major issues on project definition, schedule, budget, quality and/or benefits delivery, which at this stage do not appear to be manageable or resolvable. The project may need re-scoping and/or its overall viability reassessed
  46. 46. Readiness - scorecard Route / Venue Operations C3 Highways and Transport Safety and Security Comms Finance and Procurement Own RAG Rating (1st report) Green Green Green Green / Amber Green Green Own RAG Rating (2nd report) Green Green Green Green / Amber Green Green TdFHUB RAG Rating (1st report) Green / Amber Amber / Red Amber Green / Amber Green Amber TdFHUB RAG Rating (2nd report) Green Green / Amber Green / Amber Green Green Green
  47. 47. Economic & Social Benefits
  48. 48. Economic & Social Benefits 2007 • Over 3 million people turned out • 2 stages brought £90 million benefit to the economy • Publicity value worth a further £35 million 2014 • Over 4.8 million spectators across the 3 days • £128 million boost to the local economy • Raises profile of the health and environmental benefits of cycling 2million still cycle, 1million cycle more frequently
  49. 49. Economic & Social Benefits 2014 “There is no doubt the Grand Départ of the Tour de France was incredible for many businesses in Yorkshire and the benefits will be felt for many years to come.” Gary Verity, CEO of Welcome to Yorkshire
  50. 50. Contact for further information: Jill Gough – Head of Programme Projects Programmes and Procurement Unit Leeds City Council Email: jill.gough@leeds.gov.uk Tel: 07584002400

×