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Managing complexity: taking back control, Carolyn Limbert, Wednesday 21st January 2015

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A presentation given by Carolyn Limbert to the APM Planning, Monitoring and Control SIG and guests in Coventry 2015.

Carolyn Limbert, Harmonic – by popular demand the Mayonnaise analogy was back. When prioritising using MoSCow technique, not everything is a must have!

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Managing complexity: taking back control, Carolyn Limbert, Wednesday 21st January 2015

  1. 1. Managing Complexity – Taking Back Control Carolyn Limbert, Principal Planner, Harmonic Ltd, January 2015
  2. 2. Overview ● Realities of Delivery ● What is Complex? ● Complexity Landscape ● Communication
  3. 3. On Paper… Adapted from; (Dombkins, 1997) Scope: WHAT Objectives are to be achieved Delivery: HOW To implement objectives Low Uncertainty High Uncertainty Low Uncertainty Initiation Concept Definition Mobilisation Implementation Closure
  4. 4. The Reality… Adapted from; (Dombkins, 1997) Scope: WHAT Objectives are to be achieved Delivery: HOW To implement objectives Low Uncertainty High Uncertainty Low Uncertainty Closure Initiation Concept Definition Mobilisation
  5. 5. (MPA Annual Report 2013-14)
  6. 6. What is Complex? Making Mayonnaise? Building a Stadium?
  7. 7. Environment + Change = Complex?
  8. 8. Aircraft Carrier – Complicated or Complex?
  9. 9. Back to Basics – Context is key! New view on PM Performance CostTime Performance Time Cost Context Financing (Strategic Highway Research Program, 2012) “The intrinsic complexity of projects, in part, is driven by political, social, technological and environmental issues, as well as tight fiscal pressures, end user expectations which may change dramatically during the life of a project, and government instability.” (ICCPM, 2012)
  10. 10. The Landscape 10 Requirements What are the common challenges present in a complex project landscape? Funding / Finance Uncertainty Culture Assumptions Trades Change Tempo Decision Making Optimism Unrealistic Solutions Lack of Maturity Geography Behaviours Systems of Interests Regulatory Organisational Capability Ambiguity Risk Stakeholders Dependencies Duration
  11. 11. Types of Project (PA Consulting, RUSI 2006)Intricacy Uncertainty Straightforward Projects Complicated Projects Volatile Projects V Vee Model Waterfall Model Emergence Model Option Model
  12. 12. Complex Systems
  13. 13. Now What?
  14. 14. Perception
  15. 15. Know your areas of Influence & Conrol (INCOSE UK Capability Working Group) Influence Control Influence – Control Spectrum Purpose Focus Value Solution Enterprise Capability Service Product Influence Control Influence Control Influence Scope: WHAT Objectives are to be achieved Delivery: HOW To implement objectives Low Uncertainty High Uncertainty Low Uncertainty Initiation ConceptConcept DefinitionDefinition Mobilisation Implementation Closure Scope: WHAT Objectives are to be achieved Delivery: HOW To implement objectives High Uncertainty Low Uncertainty Closure Initiation ConceptConcept DefinitionDefinition Mobilisation Im plem entation
  16. 16. Systems Thinking System Engineering Enterprise Environment Management Enterprise Processes Investment Management System Life Cycle Process Management Resource Management Quality Management Project Processes Planning Assessment Control Decision Making Risk Management Configuration Management Information Management Technical Processes Stakeholder Requirements Definition Requirements Analysis Architectural Design Implementation Integration Verification Transition Validation Operation Maintenance Disposal Enterprise Environment Management Agreement Processes Investment Management Process Guidelines
  17. 17. Systems Thinking ● You cannot optimise a system by separately optimising its components ● Focus on defining customer needs and required functionality early in the development cycle ● Understand the whole problem before you try to solve it
  18. 18. Requirements Prioritisation Must have •The Project cannot deliver on the target date without this •There is no point deploying the solution without this requirement •The solution will not be legal / safe / fit for purpose Should have •The requirement is important but not vital •The requirement may be painful to leave out but the solution is still viable •The requirement may need some form of workaround Could have •The requirement is wanted or desirable but less important •If the requirement is left out, the impact is minimal Wont have* •Project team has agreed it will not deliver this requirement •Requirement is not needed for the solution, and is a low priority Agile DSDM – MoSCoW Prioritisation * This time…
  19. 19. Summary ● Know your landscape ● Perception is Key! ● Identify your areas of influence and maximise your areas of control ● Understand your Must Have Requirements ● Early and continual customer buy-in and collaboration
  20. 20. Any Questions? CarolynLimbert Principal Planner Carolyn.limbert@harmonicltd.co.uk
  21. 21. To find out more about upcoming events please visit our website www.apm.org.uk/events This presentation was delivered at an APM event

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