THE CRC GUIDE TO         EATING DISORDERS     An introduction to the most common forms of eating disorders, with essential...
IntroductionEating disorders are life-threatening mental illnesses characterized by an obsession with foodand weight. Thes...
Anorexia NervosaPerhaps the most widely recognized eating disorder, anorexia nervosa (commonly referred toas “anorexia”) i...
   Depression – Physical weakening can exacerbate the body dissatisfaction and self-       loathing that are often at the...
Risk Factors for AnorexiaAlthough the precise cause of anorexia is unknown, certain factors can increase the risk ofdevelo...
Bulimia NervosaOne of the more common types of eating disorders, bulimia nervosa – which is often shortenedto just “bulimi...
Treatment for Bulimia NervosaDepending upon the nature and severity of a person’s affliction with bulimia nervosa,treatmen...
Binge Eating DisorderIndividuals who are compelled to eat abnormally large amounts of food – and who findthemselves unable...
Physically, many binge eaters are overweight or obese, and most have a history of unsuccessfulattempts to lose weight – th...
Compulsive Eating DisorderIndividuals who are afflicted with compulsive eating disorder (which is sometimes also referredt...
toward impulsive behaviors, and low self-image can all be contributing factors, as can familyhistory, genetic predispositi...
Other Eating DisordersThough anorexia, bulimia, binge eating, and compulsive eating are among the most commonforms of eati...
they may resort to extreme acts of further self-discipline including even stricter regimens andfasting."This transference ...
Complications of pica can include lead poisoning, malnutrition, abdominal problems, intestinalobstruction, hypokalemia, hy...
Eating Disorder TreatmentMost attempts to treat anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders consist of the followingthree ...
Residential Treatment ProgramsFor many people who are struggling with an eating disorder, effective treatment requirescomp...
Life Healing Center                        125 Vista Point Road – Santa Fe, New Mexico 87506                              ...
About UsThe majority of the information in this e-book was adapted from two websites:      Anorexia Nervosa Treatment (ht...
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The CRC Guide to Eating Disorders

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"An introduction to the most common forms of eating disorders, with essential information about causes, risk factors, and treatment options. An excellent starting point for anyone who is struggling with an eating disorder, or who suspects that someone they love is in danger."

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The CRC Guide to Eating Disorders

  1. 1. THE CRC GUIDE TO EATING DISORDERS An introduction to the most common forms of eating disorders, with essentialinformation about causes, risk factors, and treatment options. An excellent starting point for anyone who is struggling with an eating disorder, or who suspects that someone they love is in danger.
  2. 2. IntroductionEating disorders are life-threatening mental illnesses characterized by an obsession with foodand weight. These disorders are more common in women than men and typically start inadolescence, though their effects can be seen across all ages, races and genders.Genetics and emotional and psychological issues are at the root of many eating disorders. Inaddition, our society’s thirst for thinness and unrealistic ideals of beauty, lead many to developlow self-esteem and a negative body image.Because of the urgency of the risks associated with eating disorders, getting high-quality eatingdisorder treatment early on is the best way to combat the mental and physical consequences ofthese devastating mental illnesses.The purpose of this e-book is to provide a comprehensive introduction to eating disorders –including definitions, causes, risk factors, and treatment options – for individuals who arestruggling with a disorder themselves or who are worried about a loved one.This e-book is organized into the following sections: Contents Anorexia Nervosa ……………………………………………… Pages 2-4 Bulimia Nervosa ………………………………………………… Pages 5-6 Binge Eating Disorder ……………………………………….. Pages 7-8 Compulsive Eating ……………………………………………… Pages 9-10 Other Eating Disorders ………………………………………. Pages 11-13 Eating Disorder Treatment ………………………………… Page 14 Appendix A: Residential Treatment Programs ….. Pages 15-16 Appendix B: About Us ……………………………………….. Page 17 1
  3. 3. Anorexia NervosaPerhaps the most widely recognized eating disorder, anorexia nervosa (commonly referred toas “anorexia”) is a dangerous and potentially deadly disorder that causes afflicted individuals tostarve themselves in misguided attempts to achieve their distorted image of “thinness”.The disorder is marked by extreme weight loss and an unwillingness to maintain a level thathealth professionals would consider to be even minimally normal for the person’s age, gender,and height. Though it primarily affects teenage girls and young women, anorexia can also occurin men and boys.Individuals who suffer from anorexia become fixated on body shape and weight, and regardlessof how emaciated they become, they remain convinced that they are “fat.” Though they willoften attempt to hide the effects of their disorder by withdrawing from friends and family, orby wearing baggy clothing, they actually view their self-starvation as a successful imposition ofself-discipline – and any weight gains as personal failures.Anorexic individuals employ a variety of techniques to control their weight. The following arefour of the most common measures anorexics take to avoid gaining even the slightest bit ofweight:  Refusing to eat foods that they believe to be high in calories or fat.  Restricting their diet to small amounts of a select number of low-calorie foods.  Bingeing (eating a large amount of food in a short period of time), then immediately purging (expelling the food from their bodies by taking laxatives or forcing themselves to vomit).  Refusing to eat in the presence of others (to avoid calling attention to their unhealthy eating habits).Though anorexia first manifests itself as a mental disorder, the malnutrition that results fromthe condition can inflict significant damage on sufferers’ physical and emotional health. Thefollowing are among the possible effects of anorexia:  Cardiac disease –The most common cause of death in individuals who are suffering from severe cases of anorexia.  Bradycardia – A dangerous slowing of the heart rate that results from self-starvation.  Brain Damage – Brain scans of anorexic patients have noted changes in brain structure as well as abnormal activity in parts of the brain. Some of this damage is reversible once an individual resumes a healthy diet, but certain impairments appear to be permanent.  Dehydration – Can lead to kidney failure, heart failure, seizure, brain damage and death. 2
  4. 4.  Depression – Physical weakening can exacerbate the body dissatisfaction and self- loathing that are often at the core of anorexia cases. Suicide is believed to be responsible for as many as 50 percent of all anorexia-related deaths.  Hyponatremia – The opposite of dehydration, drinking too much water can cause fluid in the lungs, brain swelling, nausea, vomiting, confusion, and death.  Muscle Atrophy – A body that is deprived of essential nutrients will begin feeding on itself, depleting muscle mass (including heart tissue) in the process.Though anorexia nervosa can cause severe – even deadly – damage to a person’s physical,mental, and emotional well-being, the good news about this disease is that, with propertreatment, recovery is possible.If you suspect that someone you know is struggling with anorexia, do not hesitate to help themget the treatment that they so desperately need.Causes of AnorexiaIts not known specifically what causes some people to develop anorexia. As with manydiseases, its likely a combination of biological, psychological and sociocultural factors.Biological – Some people may be genetically vulnerable to developing anorexia. Young womenwith a biological sister or mother with an eating disorder are at higher risk, for example,suggesting a possible genetic link. Studies of twins also support that idea.However, its not clear specifically how genetics may play a role. It may be that some peoplehave a genetic tendency toward perfectionism, sensitivity and perseverance, all traitsassociated with anorexia. Theres also some evidence that serotonin — one of the brainchemicals involved in depression — may play a role in anorexia.Psychological – People with anorexia may have psychological and emotional characteristics thatcontribute to anorexia. They may have low self-worth, for instance. They may have obsessive-compulsive personality traits that make it easier to stick to strict diets and forgo food despitebeing hungry. They may have an extreme drive for perfectionism, which means they may neverthink theyre thin enough.Sociocultural – Modern Western culture often cultivates and reinforces a desire for thinness.The media are splashed with images of waif-like models and actors. Success and worth areoften equated with being thin.Peer pressure may fuel the desire to be thin, particularly among young girls. However, anorexiaand other eating disorders existed centuries ago, suggesting that sociocultural values arentsolely responsible. 3
  5. 5. Risk Factors for AnorexiaAlthough the precise cause of anorexia is unknown, certain factors can increase the risk ofdeveloping anorexia, including the following:  Dieting. People who lose weight by dieting are often reinforced by positive comments from others and by their changing appearance. They may end up dieting excessively.  Unintentional weight loss. People who dont intentionally diet but lose weight after an illness or accident may be complimented on their new-found thinness. Reinforced, they may wind up dieting to an extreme.  Weight gain. Someone who gains weight may be dismayed with their new shape and may get criticized or ridiculed. In response, they may wind up dieting excessively.  Puberty. Some adolescents have trouble coping with the changes their bodies go through during puberty. They also may face increased peer pressure and may be more sensitive to criticism or even casual comments about weight or body shape. All of these can set the stage for anorexia.  Transitions. Whether its a new school, home or job, a relationship breakup, or the death or illness of a loved one, change can bring emotional distress. One way to cope, especially in situations that may be out of someones control, is to latch on to something that they can control, such as their eating.  Sports, work and artistic activities. Athletes, actors and television personalities, dancers, and models are at higher risk of anorexia. For some, such as ballerinas, ultra- thinness may even be a professional requirement. Sports associated with anorexia include running, wrestling, figure skating and gymnastics.  Media and society. The media, such as television and fashion magazines, frequently feature a parade of skinny models and actors. But whether the media merely reflect social values or actually drive them isnt clear-cut. In any case, these images may seem to equate thinness with success and popularity. 4
  6. 6. Bulimia NervosaOne of the more common types of eating disorders, bulimia nervosa – which is often shortenedto just “bulimia” – Is a serious condition marked by a repeated pattern of binging (eating largeamounts of food in a short period of time) and purging (immediately expelling that food fromthe body, often by taking laxatives or forcing oneself to vomit.If left untreated, bulimia can lead to a number of health consequences, including anxiety/panicdisorders, heart damage, impaired kidney functions, digestive system damage, and depression.A number of studies have also found that bulimic individuals are increasingly apt to engage inunhealthy, risky behaviors such as self-mutilation, unsafe sex, and drug/alcohol abuse.As with most eating disorders, bulimia is most prevalent among teen girls and young women –though boys, men, and women of all ages have been known to suffer from the condition.Because the behavior is often accompanied by significant levels of disgust and shame, manybulimics become proficient at hiding their actions, as well as the results of those actions.Symptoms of Bulimia NervosaThe following are among the most common symptoms associated with bulimia:  An obsession with food, eating habits, weight, and body shape  Evidence of purging (for example, disappearing from sight immediately after a meal, or purchasing enemas, laxatives, and other similar medications).  Excessive exercising, extended periods of fasting, or other extreme activities designed to counter the effects of continued bingeing  Continued self-criticism, especially of one’s weight and body shape  Isolation, withdrawal, and a pattern of secretive behavior  Loss of interest in previously important friends, events, or activities  Abdominal pain, bloating, constipation and irregular menstruation  Dental erosion and a swelling of the salivary glands  Weakness, lethargy, and depression  Constant complains of being cold, even in warm environmentsAs with other forms of eating disorders, the causes of bulimia nervosa are far from completelyunderstood. Experts attribute the onset of the condition to the interplay of a complex set ofinternal and external factors, including (but not limited to) depression, impulsive behavior, poorself-esteem, societal pressure, and genetic predisposition.Physically, many bulimics were once overweight (or at least believed themselves to beoverweight), and their disorder began as a misguided attempt to achieve a more acceptableappearance. 5
  7. 7. Treatment for Bulimia NervosaDepending upon the nature and severity of a person’s affliction with bulimia nervosa,treatment may consist of outpatient therapy, hospitalization, or a stay in a residentialtreatment facility.After ensuring that a patient is not in any immediate medical danger as the result of herbehavior, treatment often incorporates a variety of therapeutic techniques (including individualcounseling, group therapy, and family therapy). Nutrition education is also common, as is thedevelopment of an aftercare support network.Ultimately, the goals of any bulimia treatment program are to eliminate the compulsion tobinge and purge and to address any underlying physical, emotional, or social issues that mayhave been responsible for, or caused by, the development of the eating disorder.Though bulimia can wreak significant havoc on the lives of sufferers and those who love, carefor, and depend upon them, effective treatment can put afflicted individuals back on the pathtoward healthy self-acceptance and the pursuit of their greatest potential. 6
  8. 8. Binge Eating DisorderIndividuals who are compelled to eat abnormally large amounts of food – and who findthemselves unable to control how much, how often, or how quickly they eat – are oftendiagnosed as suffering from a binge eating disorder. For these people, neither the lack ofhunger nor feelings of being uncomfortably full can force them to stop eating.These recurring, out-of-control periods of binge eating are often prompted by “triggers” such asfeelings of personal disgust, domestic pressures, job-related stress, and social or academicfailures (or perceived failures). Binge eaters are often repulsed by their behavior, frustrated bytheir lack of control, and consumed by guilt both during and after their binges. This shameoften leads to secretive behavior, withdrawal from family and friends, and a growing sense ofisolation.Binge eaters who fail to receive effective treatment are at increased risk for developing anumber of related consequences, including obesity, depression, panic/anxiety disorders, andother eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia.Symptoms of Binge Eating DisorderAlmost everyone has eaten more than he should at one time or another – but to meet thethreshold of binge eating disorder, a person must do so on a recurring basis (at least twice aweek for at least six months). Binge eaters also exhibit many of the following symptoms:  Lack of control over the quantity and quality of the food being eaten.  Frequent binges even when not feeling hungry.  Eating much more quickly than is normal or acceptable.  Consuming abnormally large amounts of food, and continuing to eat past the point of being uncomfortably or even painfully full.  Eating alone or in secrecy due to a sense of shame related to the amount and speed with which one eats.  Being disgusted by one’s eating habits – and one’s inability to control or change these habits.Causes of Binge Eating DisorderAs with all types of eating disorder, binge eating is caused by a complex set of factors that arenot completely understood by health experts. Many binge eaters have histories of depression,impulsive behavior, and other psychological problems, but no definitive causal relationshipshave been established between these conditions and a tendency to binge beyond one’s control. 7
  9. 9. Physically, many binge eaters are overweight or obese, and most have a history of unsuccessfulattempts to lose weight – though, as with the conditions enumerated in the previousparagraph, the cause-effect relationship between dieting and binge eating is far from concrete.Treatment of Binge Eating DisorderDepending upon the nature and severity of an individual’s binge eating disorder, treatment mayconsist of outpatient therapy, hospitalization, or a stay in a residential treatment facility.Treatment often follows a three-phase approach: diagnosing and treating any physicalproblems, addressing underlying emotional/psychological issues, and developing strategies forcontinued recovery and relapse prevention.As formerly disordered eaters regain control over their behavior, they build their sense of self-worth and rediscover their ability to form and maintain mutually beneficial relationships withother people, all of which leads to an increased likelihood that they will be able to function ashealthy and productive members of their communities. 8
  10. 10. Compulsive Eating DisorderIndividuals who are afflicted with compulsive eating disorder (which is sometimes also referredto as “emotional eating”) feel that they have no control over when, where, how much, or howoften they eat.Compulsive eaters often experience a great deal of shame due to this condition, which maymanifest itself by extremely quick eating, the consumption of large amounts of food, acompulsion to eat even when one is not hungry or already uncomfortably full, or non-stopeating throughout one’s waking hours.Because of the embarrassment that is associated with this condition, many compulsive eaterswill refuse to eat in the presence of others – a practice that unfortunately often serves only tocompound and exacerbate their sense of personal isolation.Some episodes of compulsive eating may be the result of “triggers” such as work-related stress,relationship pressures, academic setbacks, or other failures (both real and imagined).Compulsive eaters use food the way that is evocative of alcoholism or drug addiction – theyturn to food in misguided attempts to dull emotional pain, hide from life stresses, and avoiddealing with problems in their personal and professional relationships.Often (but not always) overweight, compulsive eaters may feel stereotyped by societalattitudes toward individuals with weight problems – which can increase their shame and senseof isolation and intensify the nature of their disorder.Symptoms of Compulsive Eating DisorderThe primary symptom of compulsive eating disorder is that individuals who have this conditionfeel that they are incapable of controlling what, how, or how much they eat. Compulsive eatersoften eat alone, eat virtually non-stop throughout the day, and consume large quantities ofsugary foods (which are craved for the temporary mood elevations they may cause).Akin to the experience of drug addicts or alcoholics, compulsive eaters can also havewithdrawal symptoms – both physical and psychological – when they are unable to eat for evenrelatively short periods of time.Causes of Compulsive Eating DisorderAs is the case with the other forms of eating disorders that are explored on this site, the causesof compulsive eating remain somewhat mysterious. Addiction, nutrition, and mental healthexperts believe that compulsive eaters are prompted to engage in this behavior by a complexseries of factors both within themselves and from outside sources. Depression, a tendency 9
  11. 11. toward impulsive behaviors, and low self-image can all be contributing factors, as can familyhistory, genetic predisposition, and the impact of societal pressures and life stresses.Treatment for Compulsive Eating DisorderTherapy is often the primary component of treatment plans for patients who are suffering fromcompulsive eating disorder. Depending upon the nature and severity of the condition,treatment may include individual, group, family, and/or marital therapy.The compulsion to overeat can be a challenging condition to overcome, but therapy that issupplemented by nutrition information, behavior modification techniques, and theestablishment of a health support network can help patients to regain control over their livesand pursue considerably happier futures. 10
  12. 12. Other Eating DisordersThough anorexia, bulimia, binge eating, and compulsive eating are among the most commonforms of eating disorders, they are not the only ones that continue to plague men, women,adolescents, and teenagers throughout the world.The following eating disorders may be lesser known than the ones described in earlier sectionsof this e-book – but their relative rarity should not be confused with a lack of danger. Anyonewho is struggling with any type of eating disorder is in need of immediate professionalintervention.Body Dysmorphic DisorderBody Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) is a preoccupation or obsession with a defect (real orimagined) in one’s physical appearance.Examples of BDD behaviors include obsessing to the point of severe depression (sometimesincluding thoughts about or attempts at suicide) over physical attributes such as freckles, alarge nose, blotchy skin, wrinkles, acne, scarring.People suffering with BDD may often have a low self-esteem and unreasonable fears ofrejection from others due to their perceived ugliness. Some sufferers realize that theirperception of the "defect" is distorted, but find the impulse to think about it uncontrollable.There are two types of Body Dysmorphic Disorder: delusional and non-delusional. Thedelusional type (in which the person actually has hallucinations of a completely imagineddefect, or an imagined gross exaggeration of a small defect), is less common and more severe.Men and women living with BDD may practice unusually compulsive rituals to look at, hide,cover and/or improve their defect(s). They may spend a great deal of time looking atthemselves, and often try to convince others of how ugly they are. They may be compulsive insearching out doctors to treat them with medications and/or plastic surgery.BDD sufferers may go to great lengths to improve their appearance, including using methodsthat are dangerous. Some may even attempt their own surgery, or commit suicide.OrthorexiaOrthorexia Nervosa is an obsession with a "pure" diet, where it interferes with a persons life. Itbecomes a way of life filled with chronic concern for the quality of food being consumed. Whenthe person suffering with Orthorexia Nervosa slips up from wavering from their "perfect" diet, 11
  13. 13. they may resort to extreme acts of further self-discipline including even stricter regimens andfasting."This transference of all of lifes value into the act of eating makes orthorexia a true disorder. Inthis essential characteristic, orthorexia bears many similarities to the two well-known eatingdisorders anorexia and bulimia. Where the bulimic and anorexic focus on the quantity of food,the orthorexic fixates on its quality. All three give food an excessive place in the scheme of life."(Steven Bratman, M.D., October 1997)As noted by BeyondVeg.com, Orthorexia Nervosa should only be characterized when it meetsthe following conditions:  Long-term -- Paying attention to healthy food for a few weeks where it becomes a normal and healthy routine not obsessed over, would not be considered a disorder)  Significant negative impact on an individuals life -- Thinking about food is a means of avoiding the stresses of life or negative emotions, or thinking about food occupies the majority of a person’s day.  Food rituals are not better explained by something such as religious ritesPicaPica is a widely misunderstood phenomenon. This disorder is defined as a compulsive cravingfor eating, chewing or licking non-food items or foods of no nutritional value. These can includesuch things as chalk, plaster, paint chips, baking soda, starch, glue, rust, ice, coffee grounds, andcigarette ashes.Pica may be linked to certain mineral deficiencies (for example, insufficient iron or zinc).Pica can be associated with developmental delays, mental deficiencies and/or a family historyof the disorder. There may be psychological disturbances that lead to Pica as well, such asconditions in which a child lives in a low-income or poor family, or who lives in an environmentof little love and support.Because of the inherent danger in eating non-food items, it is extremely important that anindividual suffering with Pica be evaluated by a doctor, given the correct diagnosis, and treatedpromptly. The treatment that will follow will depend on the causes of the behavior.If the compulsion is driven by a vitamin or mineral deficiency, supplements will be prescribed;Examination of the home environment, behavior-modification therapy and psychologicaltreatment may also be needed.Pica is fairly common in pregnant women and symptoms usually disappear following the birthof the child. 12
  14. 14. Complications of pica can include lead poisoning, malnutrition, abdominal problems, intestinalobstruction, hypokalemia, hyperkalemia, mercury poisoning, phosphorus intoxication, anddental injury.Prader-Willi SyndromePrader-Willi Syndrome is a congenital condition (present at birth) and is believed to be causedby an abnormality in the genes that occurs (though statistically it does not seem to run infamilies). Children born with Prader-Willi Syndrome may have early feeding difficulties that leadto tube feeding, and often have a degree of behavioral and/or mental problems (some severe).The person with Prader-Willi Syndrome has an insatiable appetite. This can lead to obesity,stealing, and eating pet foods and items that are spoiled.This continuous appetite is caused by a defect in the hypothalamus -- a part of the brain thatregulates hunger -- that causes the person to never actually feel full. There may be sleepdisorders and abnormalities, bouts of rage, a higher threshold for pain, compulsive behaviorssuch as picking at the skin, and even psychoses.Physical problems associated with Prader-Willi Syndrome can be delayed motor development,abnormal growth, speech impairments, stunted sexual development, poor muscle tone, dentalproblems, obesity and diabetes type II. The life expectancy of a person with Prader-WilliSyndrome may be normal if weight is controlled.Sleep Eating DisorderSleep Eating Disorder typically falls into the category of sleep disorders, though it is a combinedsleep-eating problem. Sufferers tend to be overweight and have episodes of recurrent sleepwalking, during which time they binge on usually large quantities of food, often high in sugar orfat. Most often, sufferers do not remember these episodes, putting them at great risk ofunintentional self-injury.Because of the compulsive nature of this illness, sufferers are at the same physical health risksas those of Compulsive Overeaters with the added risks of sleep walking. It is not uncommon tofind a person suffering to be anxious, tired, stressed and angry.It is important to be aware that throughout life, during positive and negative stress periods,people may experience eating and/or sleep pattern problems. If either or both of theseconditions persist or interfere with daily life, then it is important to identify the underlyingcause(s) of the problem. Problems with eating and sleeping are defined as usually over/undereating or too much or too little sleep. 13
  15. 15. Eating Disorder TreatmentMost attempts to treat anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders consist of the followingthree components:  Restoring the patient to an appropriate healthy weight.  Addressing emotional/psychological conditions that may have caused or exacerbated the eating disorder.  Rehabilitating the patient and preparing for long-term recoveryEspecially in cases of severe weight loss, the first step in this process is often undertaken in ahospital or residential facility, where the patient’s diet and behavior can be highly structuredand closely monitored. Residential care also allows health care professionals to treat medicalissues that may have resulted from continued self-starvation.Among the conditions that would suggest the need for hospitalization or residential care arethe aforementioned severe weight loss, extreme bingeing and purging, dramatic metabolicdisturbances, psychosis, and high risk of suicide.Once the disordered eater’s weight begins to improve, treatment staff can then begin toaddress issues such as poor self-image, negative self-esteem, and the distorted thought patternthat prompted the development of the eating disorder. Psychotherapy is a common andeffective technique during this phase, and family involvement is often encouraged.To reduce or eliminate the likelihood that a patient will return to previous unhealthy eatingbehaviors, many treatment plans involve nutrition education, psychosocial intervention, andinstruction in the proper use of appropriate medications.Depending upon the nature of each eating disorder patient, individual, group, family, andmarital therapy sessions may be advised, and psychotropic medications (particularly selectiveserotonin reuptake inhibitors) have proved to be beneficial.Because many people with eating disorders fail to recognize that their behavior is unhealthy,resistance to treatment is far from uncommon – and continued emotional support may be thecrucial component of successful, relapse-free recovery. 14
  16. 16. Residential Treatment ProgramsFor many people who are struggling with an eating disorder, effective treatment requirescomprehensive care and round-the-clock supervision.For these individuals, the optimal treatment option is likely to be a residential treatmentprogram. In addition to providing a safe, secure, and nurturing environment in which patientscan heal from the devastating impact of eating disorders, residential programs also provide awide range of support services, including nutritional education, family support, and thedevelopment of effective transition plans and continuing care opportunities.The following are among the nation’s most renowned and respected residential eating disordertreatment programs for men, women, and teenagers. Carolina House 176 Lassiter Homestead Road – Durham, North Carolina 27713 www.carolinaeatingdisorders.com 919-372-7951Carolina House is a residential treatment center in Durham, North Carolina, for women suffering fromanorexia, bulimia and binge eating disorder that combines medical care, psychiatry, psychotherapy anddietary interventions.Located in a beautiful craftsman style farmhouse and surrounded by 10 acres of forest, Carolina Houseprovides a beautiful, safe and nurturing environment in which women can heal. Center for Hope of the Sierras 3740 Lakeside Drive, Suite 201 – Reno, Nevada 89509 www.centerforhopeofthesierras.com 775-828-4949Center for Hope of the Sierras provides an intimate setting ideal for healing and recovery for individualssuffering from anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, binge eating disorder, and related disorders. Centerfor Hope offers residential, partial hospitalization, and intensive outpatient treatment to women andadolescents.Center for Hope offers one of the country’s only specialized residential tracks for the complex treatmentof co-occurring diabetes and eating disorders. Highly individualized and compassionate treatment isprovided by team of professionals who specialize in the treatment of eating disorders. 15
  17. 17. Life Healing Center 125 Vista Point Road – Santa Fe, New Mexico 87506 www.life-healing.com 800-989-7406The Life Healing Center takes an individualized approach to the treatment of emotional trauma, mentalhealth disorders and various forms of addiction.Life Healing Center has been providing comprehensive, integrative residential treatment for traumaresolution and addictive disorders for more than 15 years. Located in the hills above Santa Fe, NewMexico, the LHC facility treats the whole person – body, mind and spirit. Montecatini 2524 La Costa Avenue – Carlsbad, California 92009 www.montecatinieatingdisorder.com 760-436-2657Montecatini is an eating disorder treatment program for women that provides individualized treatmentat residential, partial hospitalization and intensive outpatient levels of care. The eating disorderspecialists at Montecatini have been providing holistic, multidisciplinary treatment that incorporatesmedical management, psychiatric care, individual, group and family therapy, and nutrition counselingfor more than 20 years Sierra Tucson 39580 S. Lago del Oro Parkway – Tucson, Arizona 85739 www.sierratucson.com 800-842-4487The internationally recognized Eating Disorders Program at Sierra Tucson comprehensively treats eatingdisorders for males or females who suffer from anorexia, bulimia, or compulsive overeating/binge eatingdisorder. Sierra Tucson’s full integrative approach cares for the body, mind, and spirit and treatscoexisting diagnoses such as depression, trauma, and chemical dependency. The Victorian 505 29th Street – Newport Beach, California 92663 www.eatingdisordertreatment.com 800-647-0042The Victorian is a world-renowned, Victorian-style facility for the treatment of women with eatingdisorders and co-existing substance abuse issues in Newport Beach, California. Staffed by the bestclinical experts in the field, The Victorian is an intimate and caring place for women to stop theiranorexia, bulimia, binge eating and compulsive overeating, identify the causes of their self-destructivebehaviors, and forge a pathway to change. 16
  18. 18. About UsThe majority of the information in this e-book was adapted from two websites:  Anorexia Nervosa Treatment (http://www.anorexia-nervosa-treatment.com)  Something Fishy (www.something-fishy.org)Anorexia Nervosa Treatment is an treatment-based site with information on the most commontypes of eating disorders. Something Fishy is the world’s most popular eating disorder-relatedsite, featuring not only a wealth of information, but also active support forums for individualswho are struggling with eating disorders as well as for family members and survivors.These two sites, and the six residential treatment programs listed in the previous section, areproud members of CRC Health Group, the nation’s premier provider of behavioral healthcareservices.Offering the nation’s largest array of personalized treatment options, CRC enables individuals,families, and professionals to choose the most appropriate setting for their behavioral,addiction, weight management, and therapeutic education needs.CRC Health Group is deeply committed to making its services widely and easily available tothose in need, while maintaining a passion for delivering the most advanced treatmentavailable.For more about CRC Health Group visit www.crchealth.com or call (877) 637-6237. 17

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