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Hearing Aids

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Hearing Aids

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Hearing Aids

  1. 1. HEARING AIDS
  2. 2. PRESENTER: Maliha Farooqui Syeda Wajeeha Shumaila Sheikh Yasmeen Jamil Rahat Umer Asma Agha
  3. 3. THE BASIC INFORMATION YOU NEED TO KNOW MALIHA NIZAM
  4. 4. WHAT IS HEARING AID? A hearing aid or deaf aid is an electro acoustic device which is designed to amplify sound for the wearer, usually with the aim of making speech more intelligible.
  5. 5. WHEN IT USED?  When any problem in the flow of acoustic energy through different parts lead to hearing problem. Ear is the most important sensory organ for communication.  Human Ear consisting three parts  Outer Ear  Middle Ear  Inner Ear
  6. 6. DIAGNOSIS OF HEARING DISORDER.  Different Audiometric test help in diagnosing the hearing disorder.
  7. 7. DEGREES OF HEARING LOSS
  8. 8. FOUR TYPES OF HEARING LOSS  Conductive Hearing Loss Hearing loss caused by something that stops sounds from getting through the outer or middle ear. This type of hearing loss can often be treated with medicine or surgery.  Sensorineural Hearing Loss Hearing loss that occurs when there is a problem in the way the inner ear or hearing nerve works.  Mixed Hearing Loss Hearing loss that includes both a conductive and a sensorineural hearing loss.  Auditory Neuropathy Spectrum Disorder Hearing loss that occurs when sound enters the ear normally, but because of damage to the inner ear or the hearing nerve, sound isn't organized in a way that the brain can understand.
  9. 9. METHODS Auditory Brain: A- hearing Aid:  Conventional Hearing Aid  Bone Anchored Hearing Aid  Implantable Hearing Aid B- Implant  Cochlear Implant  Brainstem Implant C- Assistive Device For The Deaf
  10. 10. HEARING AID DEVICE TO AMPLIFY SOUND ---3 PARTS  Microphone: pick up sound and convert to electrical impulses.  Amplifier: magnifies electrical impulses  Receivers: convert electrical impulses back to sound Types  Conductive hearing Aid  Bone conductive hearing Aid
  11. 11. Bone Anchored Hearing Aid Based on the principle on the bone conduction Candidacy profile.  Chronic inflammation or the infection of Air canal  Children with malformed or absent outer canal  Unilateral Deafness BAHA consisting: Titanium Fixture Abutment Sound processor
  12. 12. COCHLEAR IMPLANT  Electronic device- electrical stimulation of auditory nerves  Components 1- External:  sound processor  Mic  transmitter 2- Internal:  Receiver/ stimulator  Electrode array
  13. 13. ASSISTIVE DEVICE Help in special difficult situations warm of danger signals 3 Group 1. Assistive listening devices and systems 2. Altering devices 3. Telecommunication devices Training Speech reading Auditory training Speech conversation
  14. 14. IDENTIFICATION OF DIFFERENT TYPES SYEDA WAJEEHA
  15. 15. WHAT ARE HEARING AIDS?  Hearing aids are sound-amplifying devices designed to aid people who have a hearing impairment.
  16. 16. SIMILARITIES OF HEARING AIDS:  Most hearing aids share several similar electronic components, including a microphone that picks up sound; amplifier circuitry that makes the sound louder; a miniature loudspeaker (receiver) that delivers the amplified sound into the ear canal; and batteries that power the electronic parts.
  17. 17. HEARING AID DIFFER BY:  Design  Technology used to achieve amplification (i.e., analog vs. digital)  Special features
  18. 18. TYPES OF HEARING AIDS:  Analog hearing aids; and  Digital hearing aids
  19. 19. ANALOG HEARING AID:  Analog hearing aids make continuous sound waves louder.  These hearing aids essentially amplify all sounds (e.g., speech and noise) in the same way.  Some analog hearing aids are programmable.  They have a microchip which allows the aid to have settings programmed for different listening environments, such as in a quiet place, like at a library, or in a noisy place like in a restaurant, or in a large area like a soccer field.  The analog programmable hearing aids can store multiple programs for the various environments.  As the listening environment changes, hearing aid settings may be changed by pushing a button on the hearing aid.  Analog hearing aids are becoming less and less common.
  20. 20. DIGITAL HEARING AID:  Digital hearing aids have all the features of analog programmable aids, but they convert sound waves into digital signals and produce an exact duplication of sound.  Computer chips in digital hearing aids analyze speech and other environmental sounds.  The digital hearing aids allow for more complex processing of sound during the amplification process which may improve their performance in certain situations (for example, background noise and whistle reduction).  They also have greater flexibility in hearing aid programming so that the sound they transmit can be matched to the needs for a specific pattern of hearing loss.  Digital hearing aids also provide multiple program memories.  Most individuals who seek hearing help are offered a choice of only digital technology these days.
  21. 21. DIFFERENT STYLES OF HEARING AIDS YASMEEN JAMIL
  22. 22. BEHIND-THE-EAR (BTE) AID:  It have all the features of analog programmable aids, but they convert sound waves into digital signals and produce an exact duplication of sound.  Computer chips in digital hearing aids analyze speech and other environmental sounds.  The digital hearing aids allow for more complex processing of sound during the amplification process which may improve their performance in certain situations (for example, background noise and whistle reduction).  They also have greater flexibility in hearing aid programming so that the sound they transmit can be matched to the needs for a specific pattern of hearing loss. Digital hearing aids also provide multiple program memories.  Most individuals who seek hearing help are offered a choice of only digital technology these days.
  23. 23. "MINI" BTE (OR "ON-THE-EAR") AIDS:  A new type of BTE aid called the mini BTE (or "on- the-ear") aid.  It also fits behind/on the ear, but is smaller.  A very thin, almost invisible tube is used to connect the aid to the ear canal.  Mini BTEs may have a comfortable ear piece for insertion ("open fit"), but may also use a traditional ear mold.  Mini BTEs allow not only reduced occlusion or "plugged up" sensations in the ear canal, but also increase comfort, reduce feedback and address cosmetic concerns for many users.
  24. 24. RECEIVER IN THE EAR (RITE) HEARING AIDS:  Receiver in-the-ear (RITE) (or loudspeaker in- the-ear) aids are often smaller than BTE aids because some part of the device sits inside the ear.  Like open ear BTEs, they can be easier to put in than an ear mould if you find fiddly tasks awkward.  There are different RITE hearing aids for different levels of hearing loss.  If your hearing loss is severe, you may need a type where the receiver sits in an ear mould.
  25. 25. IN THE EAR (ITE) HEARING AIDS:  These fit entirely into your ear.  The working parts are either in a small compartment clipped to the earmould or inside the moulded part itself.  ITE aids tend to need repairing more often than BTE aids.
  26. 26. COMPLETELY IN THE CANAL (CIC) HEARING AIDS:  These are even smaller than ITE aids, so they are less visible.  They are unlikely to be suitable if you have severe hearing loss or frequent ear infections.  These hearing aids are contained in tiny cases that fit partly or completely into the ear canal.  They are the smallest hearing aids available and offer cosmetic and some listening advantages.  However, their small size may make them difficult to handle and adjust for some people.
  27. 27. BODY WORN HEARING AIDS:  These have a small box that you clip to your clothes or put in your pocket.  This is connected by a lead to the earphone.  Some people find the controls less fiddly than those on smaller hearing aids.  Some body-worn aids are very powerful.
  28. 28. BONE CONDUCTION HEARING AIDS:  These are for people with conductive hearing loss or people who can't wear conventional hearing aids.  They deliver sound through the skull via vibrations
  29. 29. DIFFERENT PARTS OF HEARING AIDS, FAULT FINDING AND MINOR REPAIR SHUMAILA SHEIKH
  30. 30. HEARING AIDS: DIFFERENT PARTS  There are different types of hearing aid, but they all have the same five key components.
  31. 31. DIFFERENT PARTS  The microphone on the outside of the hearing aid picks up sound from the air as it enters the ear and converts sound waves into digital signals  The amplifier strengthens the digital signals  The speaker converts the digital signals into vibrations that then pass through the inner ear to the brain  A tiny battery powers the hearing aid  A microchip - a miniature computer that helps us tune and personalize your hearing aid to your individual needs
  32. 32. CIC HEARING AIDS PARTS  CIC hearing aids has only few parts you can notice and point out.  Moreover, It varies from one device to another.  Here are the basics and the most common parts with a few words on the functionality of each part.
  33. 33. CIC HEARING AIDS PARTS  Microphone Trivial, it receives the sounds from the surroundings. Note that there is usually only a single microphone on CIC devices. It limits some of the CIC abilities. Other hearing aids can have directional microphones and get more out of the sounds they receive.  Battery compartment The biggest of all CIC parts... Typically, it covers most of the front panel. You have to fit a size 10 battery in, and be able to open it.  Removal cord A simple nylon cord with a tiny knob so you can take the thing out. Keep in mind that CIC hearing aids are located deep in the ear canal. Once it is in you can hardly see or touch it, let alone take it out. That's why they put this cord...  Vent The purpose of the vent is to prevent occlusion feeling. It enables air and sounds to bypass the hearing aid. The vent hole on the diagram above is simply a tunnel running through the hearing aid. On some CIC it looks a bit different but the concept is the same: to enable ventilation.
  34. 34. HEARING AID REPAIRS  Age and use can take their toll on hearing aids, and while there’s always the option of replacing a hearing aid that has become damaged, sometimes it’s better to attempt some common hearing aid repairs first.
  35. 35. HEARING AID REPAIRS Common Hearing Aid Repairs  Depending on the issue, it may be able to troubleshoot or repair your hearing aid on their own. Here are a few common hearing aid fixes you can try right now:  Replace the battery  Remove and reinsert your hearing aid  Clean your hearing aid  Replace the wax filter  Open and close the battery compartment  Check your input settings
  36. 36. HEARING AID FEATURES AND FITTING RAHAT UMER
  37. 37. HEARING AID FEATURES Directional microphones  Sound from a specific direction amplified to a greater level  May help listeners to understand speech in noisy environments Feedback suppression  Squeals suppressed when the hearing aid gets too close to the phone or has a loose‐fitting ear mould T‐coil (Telephone switch)  Sound picked up from the telephone when switching to the "T‐ coil" setting  Help to reduce the chance of hearing aid "whistling“  Also works well in environments (e.g., theaters, auditoriums, etc.) where there is induction loop or FM installation
  38. 38. HEARING AID FITTING  Get a medical check up from a licensed physician to rule out any medical reasons for hearing loss.  In some cases, hearing loss is medically or surgically treatable.  Certain medical conditions may underlie the person’s hearing loss.  Seek hearing aid fitting from a licensed hearing healthcare professional.  Audiological exam, including hearing evaluation  Provide proper gain and setting: Too much amplification may cause discomfort & additional hearing loss.
  39. 39. HEARING AID CARE & MAINTENANCE  Keep hearing aids away from any moisture and heat, which may cause damage to the internal electronics.  Clean hearing aids as instructed.  Power consumption & battery safety:  Turn off hearing aids when not in use.  Keep batteries and hearing aids away from children and pets.  Visit the hearing healthcare professional on a regular basis to have hearing aids inspected.
  40. 40. HEARING AID BENEFITS & LIMITATIONS Benefits  Ability to hear sounds that could not be heard previously, and help oral communication  Ability to hear speech over the telephone Limitations  Do not restore normal hearing  All sounds, including background noise and undesired sounds, are made louder.  Sounds, including own voice, might seem too loud at first.  May need to be replaced every several years
  41. 41. LEARNING TO LISTEN WITH HEARING AIDS  Understand your hearing loss & set realistic expectations  Allow yourself time to adjust and request fine‐tuning  Involve your family members to understand hearing loss and hearing aids  Learn about communication strategies, including dealing with background noise & utilizing visual cues  Join support groups  Learn about Assistive Listening Devices (ALDs)
  42. 42. HEARING AIDS VS. PERSONAL SOUND AMPLIFICATION PRODUCTS (PSAPS) Hearing Aids  Any wearable sound‐amplifying medical device  Aiding persons with, or compensating for impaired hearing PSAPs  NOT medical devices; wearable electronic consumer products  Amplifying environmental sound for non‐hearing impaired consumers for use in a variety of listening situations  Not intended or labeled to compensate for hearing loss
  43. 43. ASSESSMENT ASMA AGHA
  44. 44.  When you visit the audiologist for the first time, case history form must be fill out.  A series of question to help the hearing healthcare professional better understand the medical and hearing history and health.  A subjective account of the symptoms a patient is experiencing so that it can use it in conjunction with a physical exam to make a diagnosis.
  45. 45. UNDERSTANDING CASE HISTORY FORM AND ITS QUESTIONS 1. Do you or have you experienced ear pain, fullness or blockage? 2. Do you or have you experienced any ringing, whooshing, roaring or other sounds when a sound is not actually present? 3. Have you ever had an ear infection or ear surgery? 4. Do you have hearing loss in your family? 5. What are your hobbies? What is your occupation? 6. Have you experienced dizziness or loss of balance? What is/was that like? 7. What medications are you currently taking? 8. Questions on general health status?
  46. 46. CONCLUSION Audiologic rehabilitation is “ any activity, method, recourse, technology and/ or a device that facilitate or enhances communication and participation in an activities”

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