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Food trends

food trends

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Food trends

  1. 1. Food Trends Chef Ashokkumar
  2. 2. Every year we look forward to putting something new on our plate. It is no different as we set sail on a culinary journey .Traditional ingredients are being rehashed and flowers are replacing Indian spices. There is a growing interest in Vietnamese and Teppanyaki food as newer experiences becomes the name of the game. Find out what will keep you hungry for more.
  3. 3. Flowers vs spice “You would want to go to work after having biryani for lunch. The focus is on making Indian food lighter. Traditionally biryani was cooked with 35 ingredients but now you have simpler versions such as coriander-spiced biryani,” flowers are replacing traditional spices to lend aroma to food. You can soak aromatic flowers in water and use it to cook food. You can also use a small amount of jasmine tea water to make jasmine- flavoured rice.
  4. 4. Indian cuisine, fusion confusion While a continuous curiosity to try new food has created fusion variations, the downside is authentic Indian is on its way out. we are stepping away from the traditional Indian fare due to globalisation and restaurants’ relentless focus on profits given their time and resource constraints. There was a certain degree of craftsmanship that went into preparing Indian food that would begin with a prayer, grinding fresh spices and slow cooking. We are losing out on this refined Indian food culture and therefore taking a step back when it comes to authentic desi cuisines.
  5. 5. Shopping for your groceries As locally sourced vegetables and fruits become the norm, there is no looking beyond your neighbourhood
  6. 6. Natural ingredients/minimally processed food Chefs see a continuing trend of guests looking for food that hasn’t had much done to it — that’s been grown with minimal pesticides, fertilizers and antibiotics, and that hasn’t had much added to it after harvest
  7. 7. Healthful kids’ menus Helping young people eat better is a national concern, and chefs see that trend continuing with items such as the grilled chicken strips paired with unsweetened applesauce
  8. 8. New cuts of meat Rising commodity prices, particularly for beef, and a general sense of culinary adventure, are opening the door in terms of both supply and demand for relatively new or less frequently utilized cuts of meat, such as the teres major, or shoulder tender, pictured here.
  9. 9. Hyper-local sourcing Herb walls in restaurants, rooftop beehives and farms owned by the restaurants themselves, or by their neighbors, have all become sources for ingredients in restaurants, and that’s something chefs expect to continue in the coming year
  10. 10. Locally grown produce Local fruits and vegetables resonate with customers and speak to seasonality like nothing else, which is one reason why salad chain Sweetgreen highlighted local radishes in the Roasted Salmon + Radish dish it promoted this spring, which also included organic arugula and kale, beets and carrots in a mustard-oregano vinaigrette.
  11. 11. Sustainable seafood Concerns over safeguarding the planet have gone mainstream, and that means striving for sustainable seafood, such as this keta salmon from Alaska, whose state constitution requires that sustainable fishing practices be followed.
  12. 12. Housemade/artisan ice cream Small touches can go a long way. Making ice cream in-house or having it custom-made for your restaurant is a trend chefs see continuing into 2016
  13. 13. Fresh/housemade sausage Housemade charcuterie keeps culinary tradition alive and can give chefs added credibility among their guests and peers. Curing whole hog legs for prosciutto or other ham can be costly and time consuming, but the cost of entry for housemade sausage is considerably lower.
  14. 14. Housemade/artisanal pickles Little touches that highlight attention to detail appeal to many restaurant-goers these days. That’s illustrated by the trend toward pickles that are either made in house or sourced from small-batch producers.
  15. 15. Ancient grains As part of a trend away from food perceived as excessively “processed,” many consumers are looking for food made the way our ancestors ate it. Hence the term “ancient grains,” which can mean anything from amaranth to teff to quinoa to millet to varieties of wheat, corn or rice that are not seen as commodities. Starbucks’ Ancient Grain Flatbread, seen here in its Chicken Santa Fe Panini, is made mostly of organic Khorasan wheat.
  16. 16. Authentic ethnic cuisine Telling guests where food comes from physically — such as from a local farm or small-scale producer — is one approach to helping them feel connected with their food. Another is telling them the origins of the dish itself. Serving creations with origins in distant lands helps guests go on an adventure without leaving town. So does serving food that springs from the local community,
  17. 17. Farm/estate branded items A sign of growing interest by many consumers about where their food comes from, many restaurants are now stating on their menus which local producers are supplying them.
  18. 18. Thank You

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food trends

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