The State Of The CSU

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  • The State Of The CSU

    1. 1. THE STATE OF THE CSU & Public Higher Education in California February 20, 2008
    2. 2. PART I: WHO ARE WE?
    3. 3. ABOUT THE CSU <ul><li>The CSU is the largest 4 year university system in the Country. </li></ul><ul><li>400,000+ Students </li></ul><ul><li>23,000+ Faculty </li></ul><ul><li>23 campuses state-wide: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Humboldt, Chico, Sonoma, Sacramento, Maritime, Hayward, San Francisco , Stanislaus, San Jose, Monterey Bay, San Luis Obispo, Bakersfield, Channel Islands, Northridge, Los Angeles, Pomona, Dominguez Hills, San Bernadino, Long Beach, Fullerton, San Marcos, San Diego </li></ul></ul><ul><li>1960, Donahoe Higher Education Act </li></ul><ul><li>1982, The CSU System </li></ul>Source :http://csucareers.calstate.edu/About_the_CSU.asp
    4. 4. THE MISSION OF THE CSU <ul><li>“ TO ENCOURAGE AND PROVIDE ACCESS TO AN EXCELLENT EDUCATION TO ALL WHO ARE PREPARED FOR AND WISH TO PARTICIPATE IN COLLEGIATE STUDY” </li></ul>Source : http://www.calstate.edu/PA/info/mission.shtml
    5. 5. THE MISSION OF THE CSU CONT’D <ul><li>“ OFFERS DEGREE PROGRAMS IN ACADEMIC AND APPLIED AREAS THAT ARE RESPONSIVE TO THE NEEDS OF THE CITIZENS OF THIS STATE AND PROVIDES FOR REGULAR REVIEW OF THE NATURE AND EXTENT OF THESE PROGRAMS” </li></ul>Source : http://www.calstate.edu/PA/info/mission.shtml
    6. 6. THE CSU STUDENT PROFILE <ul><li>CSU students are not necessarily the traditional 18- to 22-year-olds . The most recent survey (2007) found that: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The average undergraduate age is 25. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Only about 1/8 live on campus. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Only 56% are dependent on parents. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>About 1/7 are married. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nearly 25% have dependents. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>80% have jobs, and 25% work over 30 hours. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nearly 30% are first generation students. </li></ul></ul>Source : http://calstate.edu/PA/2007Facts/students.shtml
    7. 7. THE MASTER PLAN OF HIGHER EDUCATION (1960) <ul><li>Original plan approved by The Regents and State Board of Education. </li></ul><ul><li>Special session of 1960 Legislature passed the Donahoe Higher Education Act. </li></ul><ul><li>Many key aspects were never enacted into law. </li></ul>Source : UC Office of the President, May 1999 http://www.ucop.edu/acadinit/mastplan/
    8. 8. THE MASTER PLAN’S 3 EDUCATIONAL SEGMENTS <ul><li>UC: State’s primary research institution: jurisdiction for doctoral degrees, law, medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine </li></ul><ul><li>CSU: Mission is undergrad & grad education, with emphasis on “applied” fields & teacher education </li></ul><ul><li>CC’s: Academic & vocational instruction (lower div. undergrad education, remedial instruction, ESL, workforce training services) </li></ul>Source : UC Office of the President, May 1999 http://www.ucop.edu/acadinit/mastplan/ UC Top 1/8 Graduating HS CSU Top 1/3 graduating HS <ul><li>Community Colleges </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Everyone else, with CC transfer students </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>given priority in admissions to CSU & UC </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. THE MASTER PLAN’S PROMISE(?) <ul><li>Commitment to universal access to higher education. </li></ul><ul><li>Commitment to principle of tuition-free education to residents of the state. </li></ul><ul><li>Fully funded, quality education available for those who want it. </li></ul>Source : UC Office of the President, May 1999 http://www.ucop.edu/acadinit/mastplan/
    10. 10. THE RESULTS <ul><li>Higher education available for every level of California’s workforce & industry </li></ul><ul><li>Homegrown educated workforce means CA businesses do not need to move or import workers they need </li></ul><ul><li>Highly educated workforce means higher tax-paying workforce </li></ul><ul><li>From then to now: California become’s the world’s fifth largest economy. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Chancellor Reed & the CSU Board of Trustees Established: UC: Board of Regents CSU: Board of Trustees CC: Board of Governors
    12. 12. THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES <ul><li>Trustee Officers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, President </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Roberta Achtenberg, Chair (SF Local) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jeffrey Bleich, Vice Chair </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Christine Helwick, Secretary </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Richard West, Treasurer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Charles B. Reed, CSU Chancellor </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Appointed Trustees </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Herbert Carter, Carol Chandler, Debra S. Farar, Kenneth Fong, George Gowgani, Melinda Guzman, William Hauck, Raymond Holdsworth, Jr., Ricardo F. Icaza, Bob Linscheid, Peter Mehas, Lou Monville, Jennifer Reimer, Craig R. Smith, Glen Toney, Kyriakos Tsakopoulos, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2 STUDENT TRUSTEES: 2-yr terms (Appointed by Gov.) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ex-Officio Trustees </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor of CA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>John Garamendi, Lt. Governor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fabian Nunez, Speaker of the Assembly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jack O’ Connell, Superintendent of Public Instruction </li></ul></ul>Source :www.calstate.edu/BOT
    13. 13. The Folks Who Provide the Money The Governor & The State Legislature
    14. 14. PART II: THE SCREW OVER
    15. 15. THE CALIFORNIA BUDGET <ul><li>JULY-DEC: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Agencies prepare budget, Dept. of Finance, reviews, changes budget </li></ul></ul><ul><li>JANUARY 10th: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Governor announces budget </li></ul></ul><ul><li>JANUARY: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Budget bill introduced in state Assembly and Senate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Legislative Analyst’s Report </li></ul></ul><ul><li>FEB-APRIL: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Subcommittee hearings (Assembly Budget) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Subcommittee hearings (Senate Budget and Fiscal Review) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>MAY: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Revise of revenues and Governor’s budget proposal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Full committee hearings in Assembly and Senate </li></ul></ul><ul><li>JUNE: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Assembly/Senate Votes (2/3 vote) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Budget Conference Committee </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assembly/Senate Votes </li></ul></ul><ul><li>JULY 1st: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Governor item-vetoes, signs budget </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. THE BUDGET AND STUDENT FEES <ul><li>Student fees are based on two parts: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>State-based fees </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Campus-based fees </li></ul></ul><ul><li>DIFFERENCE BETWEEN STUDENT FEES AND TUITON </li></ul><ul><li>Due to CA’s economic woes, much needed money for the Education Budget (K-16) was nowhere to be found. </li></ul><ul><li>In 2002, then Gov. Gray Davis, initiates first student fee increase (10%) due to 2002 CA budget crisis. </li></ul><ul><li>2003, Consideration of 30% fee increase for the CSU. </li></ul><ul><li>Instead, state-based student fees continue to rise 10% each semester throughout 2003. </li></ul>Source :Press-Telegram Friday, June 13, 2003 www.presstelegram.com
    17. 17. Chancellor Reed & Governor Schwarzenegger agree on a “Compact on Higher Education”, a non-binding agreement on state funding for the CSU in future years. May 2004
    18. 18. WAT THE COMPACT MEANS TO US <ul><li>“ Minimum level of funding needed to prevent further erosion” to the CSU budget. </li></ul><ul><li>Ensures that students “have access to the classes they need to graduate in a timely manner.” </li></ul><ul><li>Increase in student fees that “should be gradual, moderate, and predictable, and should be considered in context of total cost of attendance.” </li></ul><ul><li>Locks us into bad budgets from now on! </li></ul>Source :www.calstate.edu/BudgetCentral/110504compact.doc
    19. 19. THOSE DAMN STUDENT FEE INCREASES Fall 2002-Fall 2010
    20. 20. HOLD UP… CALIFORNIA IS ONCE AGAIN IN A BUDGET CRISIS!!
    21. 21. THE 2008-08 BUDGET CRISIS Governor Schwarzenegger has proposed a 10% budget cut across most public sectors! <ul><li>Compact not in effect this year </li></ul><ul><li>CSU Cut by $312.9million = 10% of CSU General Budget Fund </li></ul><ul><li>CSU Budget Dependents on 10% Fee Hikes = $73 million, meaning possible increase of more than 10% for 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>No funding for New Cal Grant Students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Goal is to completely eliminate this program </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Close access to 10,000 potential CSU Students (enrollment growth of 2.5% projected fall 08) </li></ul><ul><li>Close 45 State Parks and Beaches </li></ul><ul><li>$4.7 billion eliminated from heath and human services </li></ul><ul><li>K – 12 this year mid year cut of $400million+4bill for 08/09 </li></ul>
    22. 22. WHAT THIS MEANS TO STUDENTS <ul><li>Larger class sizes </li></ul><ul><li>Fewer staff = less advising, less services </li></ul><ul><li>Fewer faculty = fewer classes, delayed graduation dates </li></ul><ul><li>Higher student fees=more jobs, more high-interest loans </li></ul>Source :ASK ANY STUDENT, FACULTY, OR STAFF MEMBER
    23. 23. <ul><li>US public colleges are unlikely to train enough qualified nurses, engineers, scientists, teachers. (National Governors Association report, “A Compact for Postsecondary Education”) </li></ul><ul><li>California will face a shortage of college-educated workers in the next 20 years (Public Policy Institute of CA) </li></ul><ul><li>CSU Tuition Trends Mirror the U.S.’s </li></ul>If there is no change:
    24. 24. CSU Tuition Trends Mirror the U.S.’s From 1980 to 2003 , inflation and incomes: BUT , Tuition at public universities: increased less than 150% increased 517%
    25. 25. STUDENT GRANT AID IS INADEQUATE TO MEET THE NEED <ul><li>Federal Pell Grants no longer really cover needs of low income students </li></ul><ul><li>Grants that used to cover nearly 60% of average tuition, fees, room and board at public four-year colleges, now only cover 33%. </li></ul>Source : CPEC
    26. 26. Student Loans 2002 : less than 40% of federal aid was grant aid. 2004 : almost 2/3 of public university grads had student loan debt. Graduates from public 4-year universities owe more than $17,000 – doubled from 10 years earlier.
    27. 27. CSU - 1985 CSU - 2005 Percent of student fees as part of CSU Budget
    28. 28. Source : Working for California: The Impact of the California State University, ICF Consulting, Nov. 2004 Every $1 the state invests in the CSU generates $4.41 in spending. = -> THECSU
    29. 29. WE ARE THE SOLUTION! <ul><li>Jobs for CA’s Economy: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CSU supports 207,000 jobs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Estimated 1.7 million CSU alumni in CA support an additional 320,000 jobs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>CSU provides some $760 million in taxes to the state of California </li></ul>Source : Working for California: The Impact of the California State University, ICF Consulting, Nov. 2004
    30. 30. Privatization of Higher Education Shifting the cost of running our public universities from the public at large to students and their families.
    31. 31. Percent of State General Funds Allocated to CSU <ul><li>Percent of State General Funds allocated to CSU Drops 34% in past 20 Years </li></ul><ul><li>Source: CPEC </li></ul>
    32. 32. CSU State General Funds in Constant Dollars (in millions) <ul><li>Adjusted for inflation, the CSU received $383 million LESS from the state in 2006/07 than it did in 2002/03 when the budget crisis began </li></ul>
    33. 33. … than on higher education . If current trends continue, in five years California will be spending more money on prisons…
    34. 34. DOWN THE ROAD <ul><li>The pipeline of students in K-12 is two third students of color, and it is critical to the state’s future that more students from underserved communities attend college </li></ul><ul><li>The CSU has experienced an increase in enrollment of first time freshmen from underserved communities over the past years as a result of our partnership with K-12 and community-based organizations </li></ul><ul><li>The largest growth has been among first-time freshman Hispanic (9.5%) and Native American students(8.5%). African American student enrollment is up by 6.5% </li></ul>
    35. 35. PART III: THE FIGHT CFA & Student Victories Spring 2004 – Spring 2007
    36. 36. Spring 2004 Campaign <ul><li>“NO BUDGET CUTS” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MAIN ISSUES </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Governor proposed an estimated $311 million cut to the CSU’s 2004/05 budget </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Complete Elimination of EOP programs </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Fee increases </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>10% undergraduates </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>40% for graduate students </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Changes to Financial Aid </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Financial Aid would not pick up the fee increase difference </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    37. 37. 2004 Allies <ul><li>EOP </li></ul><ul><li>Campus unions – Academic Professionals of California (APC), California State Employee Association (CSEA now know as CSUEU). </li></ul><ul><li>Professors </li></ul><ul><li>Student Organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Alumni, Local Community, (This was done through our Coalition to save the CSU effort). </li></ul><ul><li>Key ASI/CSSA </li></ul><ul><li>CSU,UC,CC </li></ul>
    38. 38. STUDENTS TAKE TO THE STREETS April 26, 2004 Rally at Governor’s LA Office
    39. 39. Thousands of Cal State Students Protest Proposed Budget Cuts in front of Gov. Schwarzenneger's Regional Office, Downtown LA Rally April 26, 2004
    40. 40. CSULA Student Walkout Spring 2004
    41. 41. CSUEB Faculty & Students Walkout Spring 2004
    42. 42. ADDITONAL ACTIONS – Spring ‘04 <ul><li>Walkout FU,SF </li></ul><ul><li>Angelides Forum, EB,SA </li></ul><ul><li>Rallies, LA,NO,SA,SO </li></ul><ul><li>Teach-ins LA,PO,NO </li></ul><ul><li>Town Hall Meetings, LA,SB,SF,SJ </li></ul><ul><li>EOP Rally - SF </li></ul>
    43. 43. Spring 2004 VICTORY <ul><li>Restored $40 million to the CSU Budget </li></ul><ul><li>Saved EOP </li></ul><ul><li>Restored the Link between Financial Aid and the Fee Increases </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced graduate fees from 40% to 20% to credential students, 25% for non-credential students </li></ul>
    44. 44. Spring 2005 Actions <ul><li>Letter Writing Campaign </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Collected 3,547 letters statewide delivered to the Gov. & Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez, Don Perata, Budget Subcommittee hearing at the Senate and Assembly levels </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In early April students held the following events on campus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Teach-ins, town halls, movie nights, & guerilla theater </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Campus walk-outs, rallies </li></ul></ul><ul><li>April 20 th press conference at the Capitol with other higher ed. folks </li></ul><ul><li>April 27 th BIG Actions; </li></ul><ul><ul><li>LA Region Gov. Restaurant, Schatzi’s. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bay Area: Gov. Office in SF </li></ul></ul>
    45. 45. Spring 2005 Victory <ul><li>Restored $7 million to Outreach and Retention Programs </li></ul>
    46. 46. Spring 2006: Due to our actions in Spring ‘04, Spring ‘05, Fall ’05. 10% Fee Hikes bought out.
    47. 47. Summer 2006 Victory <ul><li>DOMINGUEZ HILLS: </li></ul><ul><li>“Keep Hope Alive, Don’t take the $2.5” Campaign: Restored $1 million to the CSUDH Campus after initial cut of $2.5 million due to missing enrollment targets </li></ul>
    48. 48. Faculty, Students, and Staff MARCH to the CSU Chancellor’s office in Long Beach Nov 15, 2006 1,500
    49. 49. Spring 2007 Actions Faculty Picket Lines , Student Solidarity Walk-outs against Fee Increases
    50. 50. CSULA Student Rally April 25, 2007
    51. 51. SFSU Hundreds of Students Walkout April 26, 2007
    52. 52. Letter Drive urging the CSU Legislators to Buy Out the 10% Fee Hike : 7,000 Letters collected in 1 ½ weeks Lobby Day May 9, 2007
    53. 53. CSU Board of Trustees Meeting May 22, 2007 Students deliver the same 7,000 letters to the legislators to the CSU Board of Trustees
    54. 54. Victory 2007 <ul><li>$7 million funding to Outreach Programs </li></ul><ul><li>Because of Student activism & solidarity with faculty: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Better salaries were won, to ensure retention of quality faculty </li></ul></ul>
    55. 55. PLANS OF ACTION
    56. 56. The CSU Alliance <ul><li>Faculty, staff (unions) </li></ul><ul><li>Administration </li></ul><ul><li>$386 million dollars </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fully fund this upcoming year 08-09 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A buyout of the 10% fee increase </li></ul></ul>

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