Promoting Social Emotional Competence Individualized Intensive Interventions:  Determining the Meaning of  Challenging Beh...
<ul><li>Angela Searcy  [email_address]  708-845-2343 </li></ul><ul><li>Angela Searcy M.S., D.T.  holds a B.A. degree in En...
Agenda <ul><li>9-9:30 Introduction  </li></ul><ul><li>9:30-10:30 Challenging Behavior, Overview of </li></ul><ul><li>Break...
Learner Objectives <ul><li>This workshop will teach you to: </li></ul><ul><li>Understand the difference between PBS and tr...
National Centers & Resources <ul><li>Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL)  -  www.va...
Challenging Behavior <ul><li>What we are referring to when we say  </li></ul><ul><li>“ challenging behavior” is: </li></ul...
The Teaching Pyramid Designing Supportive Environments Building Positive Relationships Social Emotional Teaching Strategie...
Intensive Individualized Interventions <ul><li>Intensive individualized instruction and interventions are used with childr...
Research on PBS <ul><li>Effective for all ages of individuals with disabilities 2-50 years. </li></ul><ul><li>Effective fo...
Wrong Way – Right Way <ul><li>Wrong  Way </li></ul><ul><li>General intervention for all behavior challenges </li></ul><ul>...
Challenging Behavior  Communicates <ul><li>May be used to communicate a message when a child does not have language </li><...
Challenging Behavior Works <ul><li>Children engage in challenging behavior because “it works” for them. </li></ul><ul><li>...
Video 3a.2: Brendan – Before PBS
Video 3a.5: Brendan – With PBS
Video 3a.6: Brendan’s Family –  With PBS
Video 3a.7: Tim – Before PBS
Video 3a.8: Tim – With PBS
Video 3a.9: Importance of PBS
Dimensions of Communication <ul><ul><li>Every communicative behavior can be described by the form and function. </li></ul>...
Children Communicate  in Many Ways: <ul><li>Forms of communication </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Words </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>...
Children Communicate  a Variety of Messages <ul><li>Functions of communication </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Request object, activ...
Behavior Equation Joey is asked to come to circle. Teacher provides physical prompt to move him to group. Joey resists, cr...
Setting Event <ul><li>Event that occurs at another time that increases the likelihood the child will have challenging beha...
Behavior Equation Quan approaches computer and sees child working on program. Quan moves his picture to indicate that he i...
Behavior Equation   Maintaining Consequence Behavior Trigger Setting  Event Child leaves computer and Quan sits down and b...
Sample Setting  Event Chart Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri How does  he come to school? Rides the bus    Mom brings   Tantrum...
Evan <ul><li>Evan is playing with Duplos. He tries to attach a block to his stack of 3. He can’t quite get the blocks to c...
Evan Function:   Setting  Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence
Evan Function: Get help Setting Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence Playing with Duplos, can’t connect blocks L...
Shana <ul><li>Shana is sitting in her high chair with nothing on the tray. Her mother is stirring her oatmeal. Shana begin...
Function:   Shana Setting  Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence
Shana Function: Get oatmeal Setting Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence ? Hungry Sitting in high chair with not...
Tim <ul><li>Tim is riding a trike on the playground bike path. He sees a child move to the sandbox where Tim had just fini...
Tim Function:   Setting  Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence
Tim Function: Get toy back Setting Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence A child moves to the sandbox where Tim h...
Madison <ul><li>Madison is in housekeeping, putting on high heels and a hat. Emily moves into the area and selects a purse...
Madison Function:   Setting  Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence
Madison Function: Avoid sharing the purse Setting Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence Another child moves to ar...
Process of Positive Behavior Support <ul><li>Step 1: Establishing a collaborative team and identifying goals </li></ul><ul...
Potential Team Members <ul><li>Parents/Family </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher(s) </li></ul><ul><li>Assisting Teacher/Paraprofess...
Process of Positive Behavior Support <ul><li>Step 1: Establishing a collaborative team and  identifying goals </li></ul><u...
Functional Assessment <ul><li>A process for developing an understanding of a person’s challenging behavior and, in particu...
Functional Assessment <ul><li>Observe the child in target routines and settings. </li></ul><ul><li>Collect data on child b...
Everybody Helps <ul><li>Family collects data </li></ul><ul><li>Educational staff collects data </li></ul><ul><li>Therapist...
Sample  Setting Event Chart MON TUES WED THURS FRI SAT SUN What happened the night  before? Slept Poorly Yes  No Yes No Ye...
Sample Setting  Event Chart Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri How does  he come to school? Rides the bus    Mom brings   Tantrum...
Scatter Plot Student: Observer: Dates: Target Behavior: Using a scatter plot involves recording the times of day (and/or a...
Activity Analysis Child:  Rachel   Routine/Activity:  House Center Activity Description Behavior Expectations Problems Ste...
Child’s Name:  ______________ Week of:  _________________ Check the number of times the child is aggressive during the act...
Child’s Name:  Tim  Observer:  ___________________ Check yes (Y) or no (N) at time one (T1) and time two (T2) to indicate ...
Rate the problem behavior:   0 = no problems,  1 = whining, resisting, 2 = screaming, falling on floor, 3 = screaming, hit...
Child’s Name:  ______________________ Behavior:  ____ sitting ______ Week of:  _________________  Average Duration for Wee...
Activity Analysis Child:  Rachel   Routine/Activity:  Snack Activity Description Behavior Expectations Problems Steps: 1. ...
Observation Card Name: Observer: Date: General Context: Time: Social Context: Challenging Behavior: Social Reaction: POSSI...
Observation Card Example Name:   Karen  Observer:   teacher  Date:   1/22 General Context:   Choice time/art  Time:   10:0...
Video 3a.10: Observation Vignette #1
Observation Card Name:   Segment 1  Observer: Date: General Context:   Choice time Time: Social Context: . Challenging Beh...
Observation Card Example Name:  Segment 1 Observer:  Date:  General Context:  Choice time Time:  Social Context:  Playing ...
Video 3a.11: Observation Vignette #2
Observation Card Name:   Segment 2  Observer: Date: General Context:   Playground Time: Social Context: Challenging Behavi...
Observation Card Example Name:  Segment 2 Observer:  Date:  General Context:  Playground Time:  Social Context:  Playgroun...
Video 3a.14: Observation Vignette #5
Observation Card Name:   Segment 5  Observer: Date: General Context:   Circle with puppet Time: Social Context: .  Challen...
Observation Card Example Name:  Segment 5 Observer:  Date:  General Context:  Circle with puppet Time:  Social Context:  T...
Video 3a.15: Observation Vignette #6
Observation Card Name:   Segment 6  Observer: Date: General Context:   Center time Time: Social Context: Challenging Behav...
Observation Card Example Name:  Segment 6 Observer:  Date:  General Context:  Floor play Time:  Social Context:  Teacher b...
“ KIS” <ul><li>“ KIS it” (Keep It Simple) - - Create simple, user-friendly forms to collect information (e.g., rating scal...
Home Observation Card
Home Observation Card
Functional Assessment Interview <ul><li>Define behavior (describe what you see) </li></ul><ul><li>Describe frequency and i...
Functional Assessment Interview <ul><li>Refer to Tim’s Sample Functional Assessment Interview </li></ul><ul><li>TimFAI.pdf...
Hypotheses Statements <ul><li>Triggers of the challenging behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Description of the challenging behavi...
Tim’s Support Planning Chart- Hypothesis Function : obtain toy/play Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence <ul><li>Group...
Tim’s Support Planning Chart Function : attention  Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence Parents  Setting Events  (if a...
Tim’s Support Planning Chart Function : to get what he wants  Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence <ul><li>ADHD  </li>...
Hypothesis Statement <ul><li>In group play situations (outside play/centers), Tim uses verbal aggression (threats), physic...
Hypothesis Statement <ul><li>Billy will use tantrums to request a social interaction.  Billy will initiate a chase game or...
Hypothesis Statement <ul><li>Marcia tantrums to escape moving to a new activity. When she is asked to transition from an a...
Not Sure About the  Hypothesis? <ul><li>What would make the  challenging behavior   stop ?  Is it something you would prov...
Working as a Collaborative Team <ul><li>Assign roles. </li></ul><ul><li>Determine agenda and time for meetings. </li></ul>...
Roles <ul><li>Facilitator  – person who guides group in stating agenda, work goals, time allocation </li></ul><ul><li>Reco...
Hypothesis Development <ul><li>Assign roles. </li></ul><ul><li>Review child description, observation, and interview. </li>...
Major Messages <ul><li>Challenging behavior has meaning for the child. </li></ul><ul><li>Children use behavior to access s...
Tim’s Support Planning Chart Function : Obtain toy/play Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence Setting Events  (if appli...
Behavior support Plans  <ul><li>This is a  THREE tier approach  to dealing with challenging behaviors  </li></ul>
Designing Supportive Environments Building Positive Relationships Social Emotional Teaching Strategies Individualized Inte...
<ul><li>Students respond better to adults who take a personal interest in them. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop positive relatio...
<ul><li>Paper Clip Test </li></ul><ul><li>Take 10 paper clips-Move a paper clip from right pocket to left each time you ma...
Your  Behavior Is Key <ul><li>Youth look to role models, and at-risk youth may not have many </li></ul><ul><li>“ Do As I S...
 
Consider this… <ul><li>Things you can’t change  </li></ul><ul><li>Parents  </li></ul><ul><li>Your organization  </li></ul>...
RAH – at Adams City High School (Respect – Achievement – Honor) RAH Classroom Hallway/ Commons Cafeteria Bathrooms Respect...
Designing Classroom Routines Routine Desired Behavior Signal Teach Routine Entering Class Walk in,  sit down start bell ri...
3 Before Me 1. Think to myself 2.  Check the direction chart. 3.  Ask a Classmate If you still need help clip your name to...
Manipulatives! Lindamood-Bell Visualizing and Verbalizing for Comprehension  <ul><li>Visual imagery (students visualize sc...
 
 
Few positive SW expectations defined, taught, & encouraged
Behavior Support Plan <ul><li>Behavior Hypotheses - Purpose of the behavior, your best guess about why the behavior occurs...
Video 3b.1: Observation Vignette #1
Video 3b.2: Observation Vignette #2
Video 3b.3: Observation Vignette #3
Simple Solutions Support!
Simple Solutions Steps to Arrival
CEDA Bridgeview Head Start
HSCI Curriculum Modifications Module Environmental Support
Marycrest Academy in Joliet
Lexington District 1 in South Carolina
Simple Solutions Before Children come to school in Indiana
<ul><li>Work Quietly. Stay on #2 </li></ul><ul><li>Be respectful of others and their work space . </li></ul><ul><li>Finish...
 
Students love choices and challenges! Whenever possible, give students choices - whether it's a long-range project on a co...
THINK-TAC-TOE Choose three! Draw a picture of the main character. Perform a play that shows the conclusion of a story. Wri...
 
 
How WE Wait –Mom/ Dad/Ya Ya!
Logan Square
NAEYC says…Read Story While children Act it Out
 
 
Logan Square!
By building this puzzle on a tray, this child is able to put the puzzle away intact, and continue working on it at a later...
Here a child is not yet using a functional grasp, so a materials adaptation is created by using a table easel to help her ...
Step 3:  Support Plan Development (cont.) <ul><li>Brainstorm  Prevention Strategies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strategies to ma...
Tim’s Support Planning Chart Function :  Obtain toy/play Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence <ul><li>Group play:  cen...
Promoting Social  Emotional Competence Designing Supportive Environments Building Positive Relationships Social Emotional ...
“ If a child doesn’t know how to read,  we teach . If a child doesn’t know how to swim,  we teach . If a child doesn’t kno...
Identifying Teachable Moments
 
 
Turtle Technique Recognize  that you  feel angry.   “ Think”  Stop. Go into shell.  Take 3 deep breathes.  And think calm,...
Centers!
Teach  Rules in the Context of Routines
On Monday When It Rained Book Nook Activity Example “ I feel excited when I get to go to my friend Coby’s house to play.” ...
Feeling Dice/Feeling Wheel
Would it be safe? Would it be fair? How would everyone feel? Problem Solving Steps Step 2
Simple Solutions Adaptation
<ul><li>People who fly into a rage always make a  bad  landing. </li></ul>Simple Solutions Educational Services© 2010  [em...
 
Walk away <ul><li>Would this help you calm down? </li></ul><ul><li>Is it safe to walk away now? </li></ul><ul><li>Did you ...
Ask for a Break <ul><li>A short break could help you come back better to think through a problem  </li></ul><ul><li>Ask fo...
Tell an Adult <ul><li>You don’t have to announce this to everyone. Sometimes you can  discretely  leave and get an adult a...
 
 
Lose a Game…Win a Friend! <ul><li>Being a sore loser can then led to not only losing the game but a friend!  </li></ul><ul...
 
 
 
 
Anger Scale Difficulties  What Does it Look Like ? How Does it make you Feel? 5 Screaming, throwing, cursing Hot, see red ...
Step 4: Support Plan Development (cont.) <ul><li>Brainstorm ideas about what  new skills  should be taught to replace chal...
Tim’s Support Planning Chart Function :  Obtain toy/play Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence <ul><li>Group play:  cen...
Step 5: Support Plan Development (cont.) <ul><li>Brainstorm ideas about how to respond to challenging behavior when it occ...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Simple Solutions Adaptation at Ezzard Charles Montessori
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Intense interventions for north adams 2012

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Intense interventions for north adams 2012

  1. 1. Promoting Social Emotional Competence Individualized Intensive Interventions: Determining the Meaning of Challenging Behavior Module 3a and 3b Handout
  2. 2. <ul><li>Angela Searcy [email_address] 708-845-2343 </li></ul><ul><li>Angela Searcy M.S., D.T. holds a B.A. degree in English and secondary education with teacher certification though the state of Illinois and a M.S. degree in early childhood development from Erikson Institute, with a specialization in Infant Studies and a credential in developmental therapy. </li></ul><ul><li>Angela is the owner and founder of Simple Solutions Educational Services , has over 20 years of experience in the field of education, is an approved professional development provider by the Illinois State Board of Education , a national trainer for Lakeshore Learning in Carson, California , , and The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) at Vanderbilt University </li></ul><ul><li>A former associate at the Neuropsychology Diagnostic Center in Orland Park, Illinois, Angela has specialized training in the neurosciences and is a nationally recognized speaker with extensive experience working with professionals, young children, and their families as an early childhood teacher, child development specialist, staff developer, mental health consultant, parent educator, language arts teacher, college professor and tutor. Her expertise encompasses developing behavior modification programs from a neuropsychological perspective, and creating professional development grounded in neuroscience research related to adult learning. </li></ul><ul><li>She has been featured on Chicago Public Radio’s Chicago Matters , Chicago Parent and Chicago Baby Magazines and is a regular speaker for the Learning and the Brain Conference Sponsored by Harvard, Yale and Stanford Universities. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Agenda <ul><li>9-9:30 Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>9:30-10:30 Challenging Behavior, Overview of </li></ul><ul><li>Break 10:30-10:45 </li></ul><ul><li>10:45-12Case Study Activity: Behavior planning ,Behavior Equation ,The Process of PBS, Building a Team, Introduction to Functional Assessment ,Functional Assessment Observation,Conducting Observations, Data to Collect </li></ul><ul><li>12-1 lunch </li></ul><ul><li>1-2:45 PBS,Case Study Activity: Determining the Function Functional Assessment Interview,Not Sure about The Hypothesis </li></ul><ul><li>2:45-3 wrap up </li></ul>
  4. 4. Learner Objectives <ul><li>This workshop will teach you to: </li></ul><ul><li>Understand the difference between PBS and traditional discipline approaches. </li></ul><ul><li>Define forms and function of communication and identify the behavioral mechanisms that contribute to viewing challenging behavior as communicative. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify methods that may be used to determine the function of challenging behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>Use interview and observation data to determine the communicative function of challenging behavior and develop behavior hypotheses. </li></ul>
  5. 5. National Centers & Resources <ul><li>Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL) - www.vanderbilt.edu/csefel </li></ul><ul><li>Technical Assistance Center for Social Emotional Intervention (TACSEI) www.challengingbehavior.org </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning </li></ul><ul><li>www.CASEL.org </li></ul><ul><li>edutopia.org </li></ul><ul><li>The Center for Effective collaboration and Practice www.cecp.air.org </li></ul>
  6. 6. Challenging Behavior <ul><li>What we are referring to when we say </li></ul><ul><li>“ challenging behavior” is: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Any repeated pattern of behavior that interferes with learning or engagement in pro-social interactions with peers and adults </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Behaviors that are not responsive to the use of developmentally appropriate guidance procedures. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Prolonged tantrums, physical and verbal aggression, disruptive vocal and motor behavior (e.g., screaming, stereotypy), property destructions, self-injury, noncompliance, and withdrawal </li></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 7. The Teaching Pyramid Designing Supportive Environments Building Positive Relationships Social Emotional Teaching Strategies (PBS) Individualized Intensive Interventions Few children Children at-risk All children
  8. 8. Intensive Individualized Interventions <ul><li>Intensive individualized instruction and interventions are used with children who have very persistent and severe challenging behavior and do not respond to the typical preventive practices, child guidance procedures, or social emotional teaching strategies that would normally work with most children. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Research on PBS <ul><li>Effective for all ages of individuals with disabilities 2-50 years. </li></ul><ul><li>Effective for diverse groups of individuals with challenges: mental retardation, oppositional defiant disorder, autism, emotional behavioral disorders, children at risk, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>PBS is the only comprehensive and evidence-based approach to address challenging behavior within a variety of natural settings. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Wrong Way – Right Way <ul><li>Wrong Way </li></ul><ul><li>General intervention for all behavior challenges </li></ul><ul><li>Intervention is reactive </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on behavior reduction </li></ul><ul><li>Quick fix </li></ul><ul><li>Right Way </li></ul><ul><li>Intervention matched to purpose of the behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Intervention is proactive </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on teaching new skills </li></ul><ul><li>Long-term interventions </li></ul>
  11. 11. Challenging Behavior Communicates <ul><li>May be used to communicate a message when a child does not have language </li></ul><ul><li>May be used instead of language by a child who has limited social skills or has learned that challenging behavior will result in meeting his or her needs </li></ul>
  12. 12. Challenging Behavior Works <ul><li>Children engage in challenging behavior because “it works” for them. </li></ul><ul><li>Challenging behavior results in the child gaining access to something or someone (i.e., obtain/request) or avoiding something or someone (i.e., escape/protest). </li></ul>
  13. 13. Video 3a.2: Brendan – Before PBS
  14. 14. Video 3a.5: Brendan – With PBS
  15. 15. Video 3a.6: Brendan’s Family – With PBS
  16. 16. Video 3a.7: Tim – Before PBS
  17. 17. Video 3a.8: Tim – With PBS
  18. 18. Video 3a.9: Importance of PBS
  19. 19. Dimensions of Communication <ul><ul><li>Every communicative behavior can be described by the form and function. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Form : the behavior used to communicate. </li></ul><ul><li>Function : the reason or purpose of the communicative behavior. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Children Communicate in Many Ways: <ul><li>Forms of communication </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Words </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sentences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Point to a picture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eye gaze </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pulling adult </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Crying </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Biting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tantrums </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>? </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Children Communicate a Variety of Messages <ul><li>Functions of communication </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Request object, activity, person </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Escape demands </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Escape activity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Escape a person </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Request help </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Request social interaction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Comment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Request information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Request sensory stimulation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Escape sensory stimulation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>? </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. Behavior Equation Joey is asked to come to circle. Teacher provides physical prompt to move him to group. Joey resists, cries, and hits teacher. Teacher moves away from Joey and allows Joey to select a different activity. Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence
  23. 23. Setting Event <ul><li>Event that occurs at another time that increases the likelihood the child will have challenging behavior. Setting events serve to “set the child up” to have challenging behavior. </li></ul>
  24. 24. Behavior Equation Quan approaches computer and sees child working on program. Quan moves his picture to indicate that he is next. Quan observes and waits for his turn. Child leaves computer and Quan sits down and begins working. Setting Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence
  25. 25. Behavior Equation Maintaining Consequence Behavior Trigger Setting Event Child leaves computer and Quan sits down and begins working. Quan hits child and pushes his body on the child’s chair. Quan approaches computer and sees child working on program. Quan was up most the night with an asthma attack. He arrives at school looking sleepy and with dark circles under his eyes.
  26. 26. Sample Setting Event Chart Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri How does he come to school? Rides the bus    Mom brings   Tantrum at a.m. circle    His behavior? Tantrum at snack    Tantrum at small group   
  27. 27. Evan <ul><li>Evan is playing with Duplos. He tries to attach a block to his stack of 3. He can’t quite get the blocks to connect. He looks up at the adult and begins fussing. He holds the stack of blocks up, looks at the blocks, and looks at the adult. The adult helps him put the blocks together. </li></ul>
  28. 28. Evan Function: Setting Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence
  29. 29. Evan Function: Get help Setting Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence Playing with Duplos, can’t connect blocks Looks up at adult, fusses, holds up blocks, looks at block/adult Adult helps put blocks together.
  30. 30. Shana <ul><li>Shana is sitting in her high chair with nothing on the tray. Her mother is stirring her oatmeal. Shana begins crying and bangs her head on the back of the seat. Her mother says to her, &quot;It's not cool enough, honey; just a minute.&quot; Shana stops crying when the oatmeal is placed on her tray . </li></ul>
  31. 31. Function: Shana Setting Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence
  32. 32. Shana Function: Get oatmeal Setting Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence ? Hungry Sitting in high chair with nothing on tray mom stirring oatmeal. Cries, gangs head. Mom says, “it’s not cool enough, just a minute,” then gives oatmeal.
  33. 33. Tim <ul><li>Tim is riding a trike on the playground bike path. He sees a child move to the sandbox where Tim had just finished building a road-way. He leaps off his trike and tackles the child. He hits the child. An adult comes over to intervene. She comforts the child and scolds Tim. Tim goes to the sandbox and continues construction on his road-way. </li></ul>
  34. 34. Tim Function: Setting Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence
  35. 35. Tim Function: Get toy back Setting Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence A child moves to the sandbox where Tim has just built something. Tackles and hits child. Adult intervenes and scolds Tim, comforts other child. Tim continues road-way.
  36. 36. Madison <ul><li>Madison is in housekeeping, putting on high heels and a hat. Emily moves into the area and selects a purse from the dress-up box. Madison shouts “no” and bites Emily. A teacher comes over; she asks Madison to go to the thinking chair and takes Emily to the bathroom to look at the bite. After 4 minutes, Madison leaves the thinking chair and returns to housekeeping. She grabs the purse Emily had selected and continues to play. Emily leaves the bathroom with the teacher and then begins an art activity where the teacher is present. </li></ul>
  37. 37. Madison Function: Setting Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence
  38. 38. Madison Function: Avoid sharing the purse Setting Event Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence Another child moves to area and gets a toy (purse). Shouts “no,” bites child. Sent to “thinking chair,” other child consoled. 4 minutes later, Madison leaves chair and returns to play with purse.
  39. 39. Process of Positive Behavior Support <ul><li>Step 1: Establishing a collaborative team and identifying goals </li></ul><ul><li>Step 2: Gathering information (functional assessment) </li></ul><ul><li>Step 3: Developing hypotheses (best guess) </li></ul><ul><li>Step 4: Designing behavior support plans </li></ul><ul><li>Step 5: Implementing, monitoring, evaluating outcomes, and refining plan in natural environments </li></ul>
  40. 40. Potential Team Members <ul><li>Parents/Family </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher(s) </li></ul><ul><li>Assisting Teacher/Paraprofessional </li></ul><ul><li>Therapists </li></ul><ul><li>Administrative Staff </li></ul><ul><li>Other(s) </li></ul>
  41. 41. Process of Positive Behavior Support <ul><li>Step 1: Establishing a collaborative team and identifying goals </li></ul><ul><li>Step 2: Gathering information (functional assessment) </li></ul><ul><li>Step 3: Developing hypotheses (best guess) </li></ul><ul><li>Step 4: Designing behavior support plans </li></ul><ul><li>Step 5: Implementing, monitoring, evaluating outcomes, and refining plan in natural environments </li></ul>
  42. 42. Functional Assessment <ul><li>A process for developing an understanding of a person’s challenging behavior and, in particular, how the behavior is governed by environmental events. </li></ul><ul><li>Results in the identification of the “purpose” or “function” of the challenging behavior. </li></ul>
  43. 43. Functional Assessment <ul><li>Observe the child in target routines and settings. </li></ul><ul><li>Collect data on child behavior, looking for situations that predict challenging behavior and that are linked with appropriate behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>Interview persons most familiar with the child. </li></ul><ul><li>Review records. </li></ul>
  44. 44. Everybody Helps <ul><li>Family collects data </li></ul><ul><li>Educational staff collects data </li></ul><ul><li>Therapists collect data </li></ul><ul><li>Collect data in ALL settings </li></ul>
  45. 45. Sample Setting Event Chart MON TUES WED THURS FRI SAT SUN What happened the night before? Slept Poorly Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Mom on Midnight Shift Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No How was his behavior? Tantrum in A.M. Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Tantrum in P.M. Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No Yes No
  46. 46. Sample Setting Event Chart Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri How does he come to school? Rides the bus    Mom brings   Tantrum at a.m. circle    His behavior? Tantrum at snack    Tantrum at small group   
  47. 47. Scatter Plot Student: Observer: Dates: Target Behavior: Using a scatter plot involves recording the times of day (and/or activities) in which the behavior does and does not occur to identify patterns over days or weeks Rachel Maya 10/1 through 10/12 Hitting Peers Behavior did not occur Behavior did occur Did not observe NA Dates Time Activity 10/1 10/2 10/3 10/4 10/5 10/8 10/9 10/10 10/11 10/12 7:30 Arrival Free Choice 9:00 Planning 9:30 Centers 10:30 Snack 11:00 Outside 11:30 Small Group 12:00 Lunch 12:30 Nap 1:30 Outside 2:30 P.M. Circle 3:00 Departure
  48. 48. Activity Analysis Child: Rachel Routine/Activity: House Center Activity Description Behavior Expectations Problems Steps: 1. Select materials 1. Pick materials that no one is using. 2. Pretend in roles 2. Use materials appropriately. 3. Exchange materials with peers 3. Don’t take from peer. 3. Takes materials from others. 4. Follow peers’ lead or accept role assignment 4. Maintain engagement. 4. Ignores peers, interferes in play. 5. Clean-up 5. Put materials on shelf in correct area.
  49. 49. Child’s Name: ______________ Week of: _________________ Check the number of times the child is aggressive during the activity. Aggression includes: hits, pinches, pulls hair, bites, kicks, & scratches. Activity Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Average Arrival ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___510 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 Circle ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 Lunch ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 Average ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20 ___0 times ___1-5 times ___5-10 times ___10-15 ___15-20 ___+20
  50. 50. Child’s Name: Tim Observer: ___________________ Check yes (Y) or no (N) at time one (T1) and time two (T2) to indicate whether the child is interacting with a peer at the time of observation. T1 and T2 observations should be at least 5 minutes apart. Activity Date:____ Date:____ Date:____ Date:____ Date:____ Centers T1 : T2 : x _ Y __Y __N x _N T1 : T2 : __Y __Y __N __N T1 : T2 : __Y __Y __N __N T1 : T2 : __Y __Y __N __N T1 : T2 : __Y __Y __N __N Lunch T1 : T2 : __Y __Y x _N x _N T1 : T2 : __Y __Y __N __N T1 : T2 : __Y __Y __N __N T1 : T2 : __Y __Y __N __N T1 : T2 : __Y __Y __N __N Outside T1 : T2 : __Y x _ Y x _N __N T1 : T2 : __Y __Y __N __N T1 : T2 : __Y __Y __N __N T1 : T2 : __Y __Y __N __N T1 : T2 : __Y __Y __N __N Ratio: __ 2 __ #yes __ 6 __ total # observed _____#yes ____total # observed _____#yes ____total # observed _____#yes ____total # observed _____#yes ____total # observed
  51. 51. Rate the problem behavior: 0 = no problems, 1 = whining, resisting, 2 = screaming, falling on floor, 3 = screaming, hitting, other aggression Amy’s Transition Week of: _________________ Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Arrival 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 Circle 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 Nap 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 Clean-up 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 Other: _ Bus Ride _ 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 0 1 2 3 Average Score Average Score: 3 Average Score: 2.2 Average Score: 1.4 Average Score: 1.4 Average Score: .8
  52. 52. Child’s Name: ______________________ Behavior: ____ sitting ______ Week of: _________________ Average Duration for Week: ___ 9 ___ minutes Starting from the bottom, shade the number of boxes that represent the length of the target behavior. Each box represents TWO minutes. Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday 30 30 30 30 30 28 28 28 28 28 26 26 26 26 26 24 24 24 24 24 22 22 22 22 22 20 20 20 20 20 18 18 18 18 18 16 16 16 16 16 14 14 14 14 14 12 12 12 12 12 10 10 10 10 10 8 8 8 8 8 6 6 6 6 6 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 2 2 2
  53. 53. Activity Analysis Child: Rachel Routine/Activity: Snack Activity Description Behavior Expectations Problems Steps: 1. Sit in chair. 1. Stay in seat. 2. Take food from plate when passed. 2. Take one item, wait for turn. 2. Takes multiple items, puts hand in bowl, grabs while plate is passed. 3. Eat food on plate. 3. Eat from own plate. 3. Takes food from other children’s plates. 4. Drink juice from own cup. 4. Drink and put cup on table. 5. Ask for more food. 5. Ask using please. 5. Grabs food when she wants more. 6. Wipe face with napkin. 6. Use napkin, not clothing. 7. Throw plate/cup/napkin away when finished. 7. Clear place, throw in trash.
  54. 54. Observation Card Name: Observer: Date: General Context: Time: Social Context: Challenging Behavior: Social Reaction: POSSIBLE FUNCTION:
  55. 55. Observation Card Example Name: Karen Observer: teacher Date: 1/22 General Context: Choice time/art Time: 10:00 Social Context: Playing alone in house. Teacher comes over to Karen and asks her to come to the art table for art. When she doesn’t respond, the teacher tries to assist her by taking her arm to nudge her to stand. Challenging Behavior: Karen pulls away and begins to protest by saying, “No! I not go to art!” as she pulls away from the teacher. Social Reaction: The teacher walks away and says, “I will be back in a few minutes to see if you are ready.” POSSIBLE FUNCTION: Escape art
  56. 56. Video 3a.10: Observation Vignette #1
  57. 57. Observation Card Name: Segment 1 Observer: Date: General Context: Choice time Time: Social Context: . Challenging Behavior: Social Reaction: POSSIBLE FUNCTION:
  58. 58. Observation Card Example Name: Segment 1 Observer: Date: General Context: Choice time Time: Social Context: Playing alone in block play. Goes over to a group of children playing. Challenging Behavior: Sticks out tongue and makes raspberry sound, hits boy, scratches his shoulder. Social Reaction: Boy yells at him, friend brings him a lizard, boy yells to teacher. Possible Function: Initiate social interaction/Join play
  59. 59. Video 3a.11: Observation Vignette #2
  60. 60. Observation Card Name: Segment 2 Observer: Date: General Context: Playground Time: Social Context: Challenging Behavior: Social Reaction: POSSIBLE FUNCTION:
  61. 61. Observation Card Example Name: Segment 2 Observer: Date: General Context: Playground Time: Social Context: Playground play with 2 friends. Girl goes to basket and gets truck just like the other friend’s truck Challenging Behavior: He tries to take her truck, shoves, pushes, and continues tugging for toy. Social Reaction: Gets toy for a second, continues to fight girl for toy , teacher reprimands and carries him away. Possible Function: Obtain the toy (same truck as “best friend’s”)
  62. 62. Video 3a.14: Observation Vignette #5
  63. 63. Observation Card Name: Segment 5 Observer: Date: General Context: Circle with puppet Time: Social Context: . Challenging Behavior: Social Reaction: POSSIBLE FUNCTION:
  64. 64. Observation Card Example Name: Segment 5 Observer: Date: General Context: Circle with puppet Time: Social Context: Teacher kisses children’s cheeks with puppet. Says, “Say good-bye to MiMi” Teacher gets up to put away puppet. Challenging Behavior: Hitting self on head with fist, pull at shirt Social Reaction: Adult says “Ryan, ready to dance? Want to dance Ryan?” Goes and sits in her lap and is happy. Possible Function: Adult attention
  65. 65. Video 3a.15: Observation Vignette #6
  66. 66. Observation Card Name: Segment 6 Observer: Date: General Context: Center time Time: Social Context: Challenging Behavior: Social Reaction: POSSIBLE FUNCTION:
  67. 67. Observation Card Example Name: Segment 6 Observer: Date: General Context: Floor play Time: Social Context: Teacher brings him to the floor, sits him down, and then leaves Challenging Behavior: Pulls shirt off one arm, hits head with fist, thrusts back, head bangs. Social Reaction: Teacher returns, helps him with getting shirt back on and then hugs him. Possible Function: Adult attention
  68. 68. “ KIS” <ul><li>“ KIS it” (Keep It Simple) - - Create simple, user-friendly forms to collect information (e.g., rating scales, checklists). </li></ul>
  69. 69. Home Observation Card
  70. 70. Home Observation Card
  71. 71. Functional Assessment Interview <ul><li>Define behavior (describe what you see) </li></ul><ul><li>Describe frequency and intensity </li></ul><ul><li>Explore possible setting events </li></ul><ul><li>Identify predictors (triggers) </li></ul><ul><li>Identify maintaining consequences </li></ul><ul><li>Identify current communicative functions </li></ul><ul><li>Describe efficiency of the behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Describe previous efforts </li></ul><ul><li>Identify possible reinforcers </li></ul>
  72. 72. Functional Assessment Interview <ul><li>Refer to Tim’s Sample Functional Assessment Interview </li></ul><ul><li>TimFAI.pdf </li></ul>
  73. 73. Hypotheses Statements <ul><li>Triggers of the challenging behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Description of the challenging behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Responses that maintain the challenging behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Purpose of the behavior </li></ul>
  74. 74. Tim’s Support Planning Chart- Hypothesis Function : obtain toy/play Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence <ul><li>Group play: centers and outside play </li></ul><ul><li>Setting Events (if applicable): </li></ul>Verbal aggression (threats), physical aggression (hit, push, kick, punch), property destruction <ul><li>Peers give up toys/items </li></ul><ul><li>Peers leave area </li></ul><ul><li>Adults intervene with negative attention on Tim </li></ul>Preventions New Skills New Responses
  75. 75. Tim’s Support Planning Chart Function : attention Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence Parents Setting Events (if applicable): Hits cries Want’s her way <ul><li>No recess </li></ul>Preventions New Skills New Responses To Challenging Behavior: To Use of New Skill:
  76. 76. Tim’s Support Planning Chart Function : to get what he wants Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence <ul><li>ADHD </li></ul><ul><li>Wrote note for home </li></ul><ul><li>Setting Events (if applicable): </li></ul>Throws objects Doesn’t listen <ul><li>Teacher talks softly to him </li></ul><ul><li>Sit in thinking chair </li></ul><ul><li>Move to red light </li></ul>Preventions New Skills New Responses To Challenging Behavior: To Use of New Skill:
  77. 77. Hypothesis Statement <ul><li>In group play situations (outside play/centers), Tim uses verbal aggression (threats), physical aggression (hit, push, kick, punch), and property destruction (throwing or banging toys) to obtain toys and/or join play. When this occurs, the peer relinquishes the desired toy and leaves the play area and/or an adult intervenes and provides Tim with excessive negative attention. </li></ul>
  78. 78. Hypothesis Statement <ul><li>Billy will use tantrums to request a social interaction. Billy will initiate a chase game or request to be held by pulling the adult’s hand or positioning the adult. If the adult does not comply, Billy will cry loudly, scream, and bring his hands to his face or ears. Often the adult will comply with his request or pick him up. </li></ul>
  79. 79. Hypothesis Statement <ul><li>Marcia tantrums to escape moving to a new activity. When she is asked to transition from an activity (e.g., playing in the sandbox) to another activity, she will whine, cry, pretend to vomit, slap at the adult, and scream. When she does this, the adult lets her stay a little longer with the original activity or picks her up kicking and screaming. </li></ul>
  80. 80. Not Sure About the Hypothesis? <ul><li>What would make the challenging behavior stop ? Is it something you would provide or allow the child to access? Or is there something to remove? Or can you allow the child to leave? </li></ul><ul><li>If still unsure, collect more data in the same context. </li></ul><ul><li>Some challenging behavior may have the same form but serve multiple functions . </li></ul><ul><li>Some challenging behaviors may begin around one function (e.g., escape) and continue to serve another function (e.g., gain attention). </li></ul>
  81. 81. Working as a Collaborative Team <ul><li>Assign roles. </li></ul><ul><li>Determine agenda and time for meetings. </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure group participation through facilitation and participatory processes. </li></ul>
  82. 82. Roles <ul><li>Facilitator – person who guides group in stating agenda, work goals, time allocation </li></ul><ul><li>Recorder – person who writes down the discussion </li></ul><ul><li>Time Keeper – Person who tracks time and warns when agenda item is ending </li></ul><ul><li>Reporter – person who shares group information, makes presentation </li></ul><ul><li>Encourager – person who provides feedback to group members </li></ul><ul><li>Jargon-buster – person who asks the question “what do you mean when you say ‘gobbley-gook’ and helps the group with communicating clearly </li></ul>
  83. 83. Hypothesis Development <ul><li>Assign roles. </li></ul><ul><li>Review child description, observation, and interview. </li></ul><ul><li>Complete final page of interview. </li></ul><ul><li>Determine functions of challenging behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>Write hypothesis statement for at least one function. </li></ul><ul><li>Report to group. </li></ul>
  84. 84. Major Messages <ul><li>Challenging behavior has meaning for the child. </li></ul><ul><li>Children use behavior to access something or someone (obtain/request) or avoid something or someone (escape/protest). </li></ul><ul><li>The process of Functional Assessment is used to determine the function or purpose of challenging behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>Hypotheses statements describe the triggers, challenging behavior, maintaining consequences, and function. </li></ul>
  85. 85. Tim’s Support Planning Chart Function : Obtain toy/play Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence Setting Events (if applicable): Preventions New Skills New Responses <ul><ul><li>Does not teach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Change in classroom or teacher or schedule </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Teaches child replacement skill that honors the function </li></ul><ul><li>To Challenging Behavior: </li></ul><ul><li>To Use of New Skill: </li></ul><ul><li>Must monitor new skill </li></ul><ul><li>Must have several reinforcement that honors function </li></ul><ul><li>Fade over time based on progress </li></ul>
  86. 86. Behavior support Plans <ul><li>This is a THREE tier approach to dealing with challenging behaviors </li></ul>
  87. 87. Designing Supportive Environments Building Positive Relationships Social Emotional Teaching Strategies Individualized Intensive Interventions
  88. 88. <ul><li>Students respond better to adults who take a personal interest in them. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop positive relationships with all students </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure the ratio between positive and negative experiences for students is about 5 positives for every negative. </li></ul>
  89. 89. <ul><li>Paper Clip Test </li></ul><ul><li>Take 10 paper clips-Move a paper clip from right pocket to left each time you make a negative comment ---if you don’t have any paper clips after a half hour add more positives! </li></ul>Building Positive Relationships with Students Play Time & Attention Home visits Share Empathy Notes home Happy Grams
  90. 90. Your Behavior Is Key <ul><li>Youth look to role models, and at-risk youth may not have many </li></ul><ul><li>“ Do As I Say, Not As I Do” does not work </li></ul><ul><li>Short phrases are key—two sentences or less—even things like “Stay on task” or “Focus” </li></ul><ul><li>Brain reacts to positive statements </li></ul><ul><li>Lengthy arguments muddy the waters </li></ul><ul><li>Be a broken record, but don’t be nagging </li></ul>
  91. 92. Consider this… <ul><li>Things you can’t change </li></ul><ul><li>Parents </li></ul><ul><li>Your organization </li></ul><ul><li>Your coworker </li></ul><ul><li>This new generation </li></ul><ul><li>Things you can change </li></ul><ul><li>How you present information </li></ul><ul><li>How you speak to the child (ren) </li></ul><ul><li>How long, how fast, the location </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher directed, child directed, small groups, large groups </li></ul><ul><li>You expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Rate of reinforcement </li></ul><ul><li>Materials you use </li></ul><ul><li>Your approach </li></ul>
  92. 93. RAH – at Adams City High School (Respect – Achievement – Honor) RAH Classroom Hallway/ Commons Cafeteria Bathrooms Respect Be on time; attend regularly; follow class rules Keep location neat, keep to the right, use appropriate lang., monitor noise level, allow others to pass Put trash in cans, push in your chair, be courteous to all staff and students Keep area clean, put trash in cans, be mindful of others’ personal space, flush toilet Achievement Do your best on all assignments and assessments, take notes, ask questions Keep track of your belongings, monitor time to get to class Check space before you leave, keep track of personal belongings Be a good example to other students, leave the room better than you found it Honor Do your own work; tell the truth Be considerate of yours and others’ personal space Keep your own place in line, maintain personal boundaries Report any graffiti or vandalism
  93. 94. Designing Classroom Routines Routine Desired Behavior Signal Teach Routine Entering Class Walk in, sit down start bell ringer High five/greeting walking in the door Positive and Negative Examples first week of class/ongoing/who will get the sticker??? Obtaining class attention Students need to stop whatever they are doing and immediately look in my direction Teacher says “class” lights out singing bowl Positive and Negative Examples first week of class/ongoing/who’s the fastest??? FAST PASS Getting Help during seat work/group time Use 3 before me Visual on Wall as reminder/direction chart
  94. 95. 3 Before Me 1. Think to myself 2. Check the direction chart. 3. Ask a Classmate If you still need help clip your name to the chart for teacher help.
  95. 96. Manipulatives! Lindamood-Bell Visualizing and Verbalizing for Comprehension <ul><li>Visual imagery (students visualize scenes in detail); </li></ul>
  96. 99. Few positive SW expectations defined, taught, & encouraged
  97. 100. Behavior Support Plan <ul><li>Behavior Hypotheses - Purpose of the behavior, your best guess about why the behavior occurs </li></ul><ul><li>Prevention Strategies - Ways to make events and interactions that trigger challenging behavior easier for the child to manage </li></ul><ul><li>Replacement Skills – New skills to teach throughout the day to replace the challenging behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Responses - What adults will do when the challenging behavior occurs to ensure that the challenging behavior is not maintained and the new skill is learned </li></ul>
  98. 101. Video 3b.1: Observation Vignette #1
  99. 102. Video 3b.2: Observation Vignette #2
  100. 103. Video 3b.3: Observation Vignette #3
  101. 104. Simple Solutions Support!
  102. 105. Simple Solutions Steps to Arrival
  103. 106. CEDA Bridgeview Head Start
  104. 107. HSCI Curriculum Modifications Module Environmental Support
  105. 108. Marycrest Academy in Joliet
  106. 109. Lexington District 1 in South Carolina
  107. 110. Simple Solutions Before Children come to school in Indiana
  108. 111. <ul><li>Work Quietly. Stay on #2 </li></ul><ul><li>Be respectful of others and their work space . </li></ul><ul><li>Finish your work. </li></ul><ul><li>Clean up. </li></ul><ul><li>Complete task ticket. </li></ul><ul><li>Put your work in your center folder. </li></ul><ul><li>Fix or finish an old center. </li></ul>
  109. 113. Students love choices and challenges! Whenever possible, give students choices - whether it's a long-range project on a country they select, or coloring a map with crayon, marker, or colored pencil! I try to give as many &quot;small&quot; forced choices as possible, even if it seems insignificant. Linda Norman Ayer Middle School Ayer, MA Grade Levels: 6-8 Read more on TeacherVision: http://www.teachervision.fen.com/slideshow/classroom-management/52282.html#ixzz1LP9U9fhM
  110. 114. THINK-TAC-TOE Choose three! Draw a picture of the main character. Perform a play that shows the conclusion of a story. Write a song about one of the main events. Write a poem about two main events in the story. Make a poster that shows the order of events in the story. Dress up as your favorite character and perform a speech telling who you are. Create a Venn diagram comparing and contrasting the introduction to the closing. Write two paragraphs about the main character. Write two paragraphs about the setting.
  111. 117. How WE Wait –Mom/ Dad/Ya Ya!
  112. 118. Logan Square
  113. 119. NAEYC says…Read Story While children Act it Out
  114. 122. Logan Square!
  115. 123. By building this puzzle on a tray, this child is able to put the puzzle away intact, and continue working on it at a later time. HSCI Curriculum Modifications Module
  116. 124. Here a child is not yet using a functional grasp, so a materials adaptation is created by using a table easel to help her keep her hand in the appropriate position. HSCI Curriculum Modifications Module
  117. 125. Step 3: Support Plan Development (cont.) <ul><li>Brainstorm Prevention Strategies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Strategies to make routines or activities easier for the child </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strategies to soften the triggers </li></ul></ul>
  118. 126. Tim’s Support Planning Chart Function : Obtain toy/play Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence <ul><li>Group play: centers and outside play with peers </li></ul><ul><li>Setting Events (if applicable): </li></ul>Verbal aggression (threats), physical aggression (hit, push, kick, punch), property destruction <ul><li>Peers give up toys/items </li></ul><ul><li>Peers leave area </li></ul><ul><li>Adults intervene with negative attention to Tim </li></ul>Preventions New Skills New Responses <ul><li>Pre-teach skills by role playing via scripted story </li></ul><ul><li>Use visual cards to help him remember lessons when in difficult situation </li></ul><ul><li>Self-monitoring form to work on new skills </li></ul>To Challenging Behavior: Use of New Skill:
  119. 127. Promoting Social Emotional Competence Designing Supportive Environments Building Positive Relationships Social Emotional Teaching Strategies Individualized Intensive Interventions
  120. 128. “ If a child doesn’t know how to read, we teach . If a child doesn’t know how to swim, we teach . If a child doesn’t know how to multiply, we teach . If a child doesn’t know how to drive, we teach. If a child doesn’t know how to behave, we……..... …….teach? ……punish? Why can’t we finish the last sentence as automatically as we do the others?” Tom Herner (NASDE President ) Counterpoint 1998, p.2)
  121. 129. Identifying Teachable Moments
  122. 132. Turtle Technique Recognize that you feel angry. “ Think” Stop. Go into shell. Take 3 deep breathes. And think calm, coping thoughts. Come out of shell when calm and think of a solution.
  123. 133. Centers!
  124. 134. Teach Rules in the Context of Routines
  125. 135. On Monday When It Rained Book Nook Activity Example “ I feel excited when I get to go to my friend Coby’s house to play.” “ I feel upset when my mommy didn’t get me anything.”
  126. 136. Feeling Dice/Feeling Wheel
  127. 137. Would it be safe? Would it be fair? How would everyone feel? Problem Solving Steps Step 2
  128. 138. Simple Solutions Adaptation
  129. 139. <ul><li>People who fly into a rage always make a bad landing. </li></ul>Simple Solutions Educational Services© 2010 [email_address] 866-660-3899
  130. 141. Walk away <ul><li>Would this help you calm down? </li></ul><ul><li>Is it safe to walk away now? </li></ul><ul><li>Did you ask permission to walk away from an adult? </li></ul><ul><li>How would everyone feel? </li></ul><ul><li>Would it make things worse? </li></ul><ul><li>Do’s </li></ul><ul><li>Do tell others “I need to walk away now. We can talk later” </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t </li></ul><ul><li>Walk away while children are speaking to you </li></ul>Simple Solutions Educational Services© 2010 [email_address] 866-660-3899
  131. 142. Ask for a Break <ul><li>A short break could help you come back better to think through a problem </li></ul><ul><li>Ask for a drink of water, go to the bathroom, take three deep breaths, do something you like ( color for a few minutes) </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes we need a break from our friends </li></ul><ul><li>Times to ask for a break: </li></ul><ul><li>Sleepy </li></ul><ul><li>Frustrated </li></ul><ul><li>Overwhelmed </li></ul>Simple Solutions Educational Services © 2010 [email_address] 866-660-3899
  132. 143. Tell an Adult <ul><li>You don’t have to announce this to everyone. Sometimes you can discretely leave and get an adult and ask the adult to not share who asked for help </li></ul><ul><li>When to get an adult: </li></ul><ul><li>When someone is about to get hurt </li></ul><ul><li>When you are about to get hurt </li></ul><ul><li>When you need more tools to solve a problem </li></ul>Simple Solutions Educational Services© 2010 [email_address] 866-660-3899
  133. 146. Lose a Game…Win a Friend! <ul><li>Being a sore loser can then led to not only losing the game but a friend! </li></ul><ul><li>You can play and win another time </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone should get a chance to win </li></ul><ul><li>Win a friend by saying “good game” </li></ul>Simple Solutions Educational Services© 2010 [email_address] 866-660-3899
  134. 151. Anger Scale Difficulties What Does it Look Like ? How Does it make you Feel? 5 Screaming, throwing, cursing Hot, see red 4 Walking away-but adult or student won’t let me Trying to calm myself, sweating, getting hot 3 Yelling Getting mad, body tight 2 Arguing –but calm Getting frustrated 1 Try to ignore the problem-don’t respond Ok -cool
  135. 152. Step 4: Support Plan Development (cont.) <ul><li>Brainstorm ideas about what new skills should be taught to replace challenging behavior; write new skills on chart. </li></ul>
  136. 153. Tim’s Support Planning Chart Function : Obtain toy/play Trigger Behavior Maintaining Consequence <ul><li>Group play: centers and outside play with peers </li></ul><ul><li>Setting Events (if applicable): </li></ul>Verbal aggression (threats), physical aggression (hit, push, kick, punch), property destruction <ul><li>Peers give up toys/items </li></ul><ul><li>Peers leave area </li></ul><ul><li>Adults intervene with negative attention to Tim </li></ul>Preventions New Skills New Responses <ul><li>Pre-teach skills by role playing via scripted story </li></ul><ul><li>Use visual cards to help him remember lessons when in difficult situation </li></ul><ul><li>Self-monitoring form to work on new skills </li></ul><ul><li>Asking to play </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone can play with the toys </li></ul><ul><li>Asking for teacher’s help </li></ul>To Challenging Behavior: To Use o New Skill:
  137. 154. Step 5: Support Plan Development (cont.) <ul><li>Brainstorm ideas about how to respond to challenging behavior when it occurs; write new responses on chart. </li></ul>
  138. 163. Simple Solutions Adaptation at Ezzard Charles Montessori

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