Knowledge Management Education: A Framework towards the Development of  a Comprehensive Degree Program André Saito [email_...
Background <ul><li>Emergence of the knowledge society </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge  as economic resource </li></ul></ul...
Goal <ul><li>To build a framework that facilitated the development of KM programs and courses. The framework should: </li>...
Methodology <ul><li>Survey of existing KM programs </li></ul><ul><li>Content analysis of course descriptions </li></ul><ul...
Findings   Survey of KM programs Regularly offered 29 Not regular 7 Not available 17 Master’s 23 Certificate/ Diploma 4 Do...
Findings   Analysis of courses’ descriptions <ul><li>Standardizing the names of the courses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledg...
Findings   Analysis of courses’ descriptions  (cont.) <ul><li>Listing and categorizing topics </li></ul><ul><li>Business <...
Developing the framework   The  Contents  part <ul><li>List of topics, grouped into four perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Te...
Developing the framework   The  Proficiency Levels  part <ul><li>Three levels of expected proficiency </li></ul><ul><ul><l...
Developing the framework   The  Profile  chart <ul><li>Contents  and  Proficiency Levels  combine to show the  Profile  of...
Implications   Analyzing existing programs <ul><li>Individual courses can be analyzed and  combined  to assess segments of...
Implications   Analyzing existing programs  (cont.) Common core Specialization Program as a whole Common core Specializati...
Implications   Developing programs and courses <ul><li>1. Define general  profile  according to learning needs of intended...
Summary <ul><li>Proposed framework for developing knowledge management programs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Contents : Business,...
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Knowledge management education

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Presents a framework for facilitating the development of graduate programs in knowledge management. Paper presented at KSS 2004, the 5th International Symposium on Knowledge and Systems Sciences, Ishikawa, Japan.

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Knowledge management education

  1. 1. Knowledge Management Education: A Framework towards the Development of a Comprehensive Degree Program André Saito [email_address] Tunç Medeni [email_address] Marcelo Machado [email_address] Katsuhiro Umemoto [email_address] <ul><li>KSS 2004 The 5 th International Symposium on Knowledge and Systems Sciences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>November 10-12, 2004, Ishikawa, Japan </li></ul></ul>Ver 2.2 – 2004-11-09 School of Knowledge Science Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
  2. 2. Background <ul><li>Emergence of the knowledge society </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge as economic resource </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Explosion of publications, activities, institutions, products </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Establishment of KM as an academic discipline </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge workers vs. “ knowledge managers ” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>KM: from practice to research to education </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Diversity of perspectives in KM </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Many contributing fields : economics, management science, computer science, systems science, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Roughly two main approaches : people -oriented and technology -oriented </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Goal <ul><li>To build a framework that facilitated the development of KM programs and courses. The framework should: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Present a comprehensive perspective to KM </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>e.g. integrating the main contributing fields, and the people - and the technology -oriented approaches </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Serve the educational needs of a wide audience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>e.g. senior executives, middle managers and entry-level professionals. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allow programs/courses with different structures and formats </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>e.g. graduate degree programs, short diploma programs, individual courses. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Methodology <ul><li>Survey of existing KM programs </li></ul><ul><li>Content analysis of course descriptions </li></ul><ul><li>Design of the framework </li></ul><ul><li>Verification of the framework by analyzing existing courses and programs </li></ul>
  5. 5. Findings Survey of KM programs Regularly offered 29 Not regular 7 Not available 17 Master’s 23 Certificate/ Diploma 4 Doctoral 2 Focus on 23 KM master’s programs: Computer Science, Information Systems, Engineering 9 Library and Information Science, Communication 8 Management, Public Policy, Economics 6 Initial list of 53 KM programs 29 programs offered regularly
  6. 6. Findings Analysis of courses’ descriptions <ul><li>Standardizing the names of the courses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge Management Foundations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge Management Technologies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organization of Information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organizational Learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information Storage and Retrieval </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Competitive Intelligence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Management of Information Organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Communities of Practice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Most frequent courses (in 21 programs) : </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Findings Analysis of courses’ descriptions (cont.) <ul><li>Listing and categorizing topics </li></ul><ul><li>Business </li></ul><ul><li>Context </li></ul><ul><li>People </li></ul><ul><li>Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Information </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Competitive intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>Business value of KM </li></ul><ul><li>Competitive advantage </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge strategy </li></ul><ul><li>The information society </li></ul><ul><li>Information economics </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge work </li></ul><ul><li>Ethics and legal issues </li></ul><ul><li>Power and leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of practice </li></ul><ul><li>Team management </li></ul><ul><li>KM roles </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational behavior </li></ul><ul><li>Change management </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational learning </li></ul><ul><li>Organization of information </li></ul><ul><li>Information retrieval </li></ul><ul><li>Information policy </li></ul><ul><li>Information architecture </li></ul><ul><li>Types of knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge life-cycle </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge processes </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge representation </li></ul><ul><li>Corporate portals </li></ul><ul><li>Document management </li></ul><ul><li>Decision support systems </li></ul><ul><li>IT infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Etc. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Developing the framework The Contents part <ul><li>List of topics, grouped into four perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge repositories </li></ul><ul><li>Corporate portals </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge discovery, data mining </li></ul><ul><li>Decision support systems </li></ul><ul><li>Artificial intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative environments </li></ul><ul><li>Etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational learning </li></ul><ul><li>Communities of practice </li></ul><ul><li>Power and leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational behavior and culture </li></ul><ul><li>Change management </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge professionals </li></ul><ul><li>Etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Types of knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Organization of knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge life-cycle </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge processes/ activities </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge architecture </li></ul><ul><li>Taxonomies </li></ul><ul><li>Etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Business </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge economy/ society </li></ul><ul><li>Innovation, competitive advantage </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Competitive intelligence </li></ul><ul><li>Inter-organizational KM </li></ul><ul><li>Intellectual capital </li></ul><ul><li>Etc. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Developing the framework The Proficiency Levels part <ul><li>Three levels of expected proficiency </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1. Awareness : getting acquainted , recalling topics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2. Comprehension : understanding , dealing with topics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3. Application : applying topics actively in real situations </li></ul></ul>B T O K Awareness Comprehension Application
  10. 10. Developing the framework The Profile chart <ul><li>Contents and Proficiency Levels combine to show the Profile of a program or course. </li></ul>Competitive Intelligence (B 2 K 2 T 1 O 1 ) Leadership and Management (B 1 K 1 T 0 O 2 ) T O K B T O K B
  11. 11. Implications Analyzing existing programs <ul><li>Individual courses can be analyzed and combined to assess segments of a program or the whole program </li></ul><ul><li>Common core </li></ul><ul><li>Required courses : </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge Management </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational Analysis and Design </li></ul><ul><li>Management Information Systems </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge Technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Information Policy </li></ul><ul><li>Organization of Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Capstone Course/ Practicum </li></ul><ul><li>Specialization </li></ul><ul><li>Required courses : </li></ul><ul><li>Database Management </li></ul><ul><li>Information Systems Analysis & Design </li></ul><ul><li>Electives : </li></ul><ul><li>Information Storage and Retrieval </li></ul><ul><li>Searching Electronic Databases </li></ul><ul><li>Metadata for Internet Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Internet Fundamentals and Design </li></ul>Example: MSc. in KM, specializing in Information Systems
  12. 12. Implications Analyzing existing programs (cont.) Common core Specialization Program as a whole Common core Specialization T O K B T O K B T O K B T O K B T O K B T O K B T O K B T O K B T O K B T O K B T O K B T O K B T O K B T O K B T O K B T O K B
  13. 13. Implications Developing programs and courses <ul><li>1. Define general profile according to learning needs of intended audience </li></ul><ul><li>2. Design individual courses, assigning topics according to general profile </li></ul>Profile of the program as a whole Profiles of individual courses KM Foundations Knowledge Strategy Change Management Knowledge Technologies T O K B T O K B T O K B T O K B T O K B
  14. 14. Summary <ul><li>Proposed framework for developing knowledge management programs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Contents : Business, Knowledge, Technology, and Organization perspectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Proficiency Levels : awareness, comprehension, or application of content </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Profile chart </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The framework can be used for: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Assessing existing courses and programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Developing new programs and courses according to learning needs </li></ul></ul>

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