MARKET AN ALYSIS                                                               Worldwide Software 2008–2012 Forecast Summa...
T ABLE OF CONT ENT S                                                                                                      ...
LIST OF T ABLES                                                                                                           ...
LIST OF FIGURES                                                                                                           ...
IN THIS STUDYThis IDC study provides a comprehensive summary of the worldwide packagedsoftware market for 2007 and a five-...
Operating EnvironmentsMarket revenue and forecasts are also segmented by operating environment.Operating environments are ...
FIGURE 1Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Primary Market andRegion, 2007   Application development and            dep...
Worldwide Software Market Drivers, 2008–2012IDC published a number of predictions studies in late 2007 and early 2008 with...
note is that many organizations that may have not yet jumped on the SOA    bandwagon for a variety of reasons may be compe...
often involved a fairly large vendor, such as FileNet, Cognos, Hyperion, or    Stellent, being acquired by an even larger ...
that these relationships will leverage the acquisition/consolidation boom in other    software markets to provide a manage...
strategies dominate, but they are changing. Hybrid business models emerging    now will evolve further and solidify over t...
This study also includes revenue data for each of the three primary markets: AD&D,applications, and SIS. AD&D revenue is c...
Competitive Market Maps including the top 10 vendors in each primary market arepresented in Figures 2–4. Common to all of ...
FIGURE 3Applications Competitive Market Map                    Adobe                    IBM         Sage Group            ...
FIGURE 4System Infrastructure Software Competitive Market Map                      VMware                                 ...
Worldwide Performance in 2007 by Primary MarketApplication Development and DeploymentThe AD&D markets include software pro...
T ABLE 2 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Top 100 Vendors, 2005–2007 ($M)                                           ...
T ABLE 2 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Top 100 Vendors, 2005–2007 ($M)                                           ...
T ABLE 2 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Top 100 Vendors, 2005–2007 ($M)                                           ...
T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M)                                                    ...
T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M)                                                    ...
T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M)                                                    ...
T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M)                                                    ...
T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M)                                                    ...
T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M)                                                    ...
T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M)                                                    ...
T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M)                                                    ...
IDC Worldwide Software 2008-2012 Forecast Summary
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IDC Worldwide Software 2008-2012 Forecast Summary

  1. 1. MARKET AN ALYSIS Worldwide Software 2008–2012 Forecast Summary Richard V. Heiman IDC OPINION The worldwide software market underwent very strong revenue growth from $231.1 billion in 2006 to $262.7 billion in 2007, an annual increase of 13.7%. However, from 2007 to 2012, the projected compound annual growth rate (CAGR) is a more modestwww.idc.com 7.7%. IDC believes that: ! The 2007 growth was in part due to the weakness of the U.S. dollar against other major currencies.F.508.935.4015 ! The software industry is maturing and consolidating. This phenomenon continued in 2007 and will do so in the future. ! Emerging market drivers such as Eureka 2.0, software appliances, service- oriented architecture (SOA), and virtualization will provide growth opportunitiesP.508.872.8200 even in the face of macroeconomic uncertainties and volatility. ! Successful software vendors will be those that can best adapt their technologies and business models to the continually changing dynamics of the marketplace.Global Headquarters: 5 Speen Street Framingham, MA 01701 USA Filing Information: July 2008, IDC #213259, Volume: 1 Software Overview: Market Analysis
  2. 2. T ABLE OF CONT ENT S PIn This Study 1Methodology ............................................................................................................................................. 1Executive Summary.................................................................................................................................. 2S i t u a t i o n O ve r v i e w 8Worldwide Software Market Performance in 2007.................................................................................... 8Future Outlook 136Forecast and Assumptions ....................................................................................................................... 136Market Context ......................................................................................................................................... 162Essential Guidance 163Learn More 163Related Research ..................................................................................................................................... 163Appendix A: Worldwide Software Market Sizing and Forecast Methodology............................................ 168Appendix B: Worldwide Software Market Forecast Summary Glossary ................................................... 170Appendix C: Competitive Market Map Methodology................................................................................. 214#213259 ©2008 IDC
  3. 3. LIST OF T ABLES P 1 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Region and Primary Market, 2007.......................... 3 2 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Top 100 Vendors, 2005–2007 ................................ 14 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ................................................ 16 4 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor and Region, 2007....................................... 38 5 Worldwide Application Development and Deployment Software Revenue by Top 50 Vendors, 2005–2007.................................................................................................................... 68 6 Worldwide Application Development and Deployment Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ................................................................................................................................... 69 7 Worldwide Application Development and Deployment Software Revenue by Vendor and Region, 2007................................................................................................................................ 75 8 Worldwide Application Software Revenue by Top 50 Vendors, 2005–2007 ................................ 83 9 Worldwide Application Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 .............................................. 84 10 Worldwide Application Software Revenue by Vendor and Region, 2007 ..................................... 99 11 Worldwide System Infrastructure Software Revenue by Top 50 Vendors, 2005–2007 ................ 120 12 Worldwide System Infrastructure Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007.............................. 121 13 Worldwide System Infrastructure Software Revenue by Vendor and Region, 2007..................... 127 14 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Top 50 Vendors and Operating Environment, 2007 ....................................................................................................................... 135 15 Key Forecast Assumptions for the Worldwide Software Market, 2008–2012............................... 137 16 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Primary Market and Region, 2007–2012 ................ 159 17 Worldwide Application Development and Deployment Software Revenue by Operating Environment, 2007–2012 ............................................................................................................. 161 18 Worldwide Application Software Revenue by Operating Environment, 2007–2012 ..................... 161 19 Worldwide System Infrastructure Software Revenue by Operating Environment, 2007–2012..... 161 20 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue, 2005–2012: Comparison of June 2007 and June 2008 Forecasts ............................................................................................................................ 162 21 Exchange Rates, 2003–2007 ....................................................................................................... 170©2008 IDC #213259
  4. 4. LIST OF FIGURES P 1 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Primary Market and Region, 2007 .......................... 3 2 Application Development and Deployment Competitive Market Map........................................... 10 3 Applications Competitive Market Map .......................................................................................... 11 4 System Infrastructure Software Competitive Market Map ............................................................ 12 5 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Primary Market, 2007–2012 ................................... 160 6 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Region, 2007–2012 ................................................ 160 7 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue, 2005–2012: Comparison of June 2007 and June 2008 Forecasts ............................................................................................................................ 163#213259 ©2008 IDC
  5. 5. IN THIS STUDYThis IDC study provides a comprehensive summary of the worldwide packagedsoftware market for 2007 and a five-year revenue forecast by geographic region andoperating environment through 2012. Vendor revenue and market share for nearly1,000 vendors are provided for 2007.MethodologyThis study, published annually, encompasses the entire packaged software market,with the applicable market segment elements outlined below. Appendix A describesthe methodology used for the development of content, and Appendix B provides aglossary that offers detailed market definitions and explains how IDC definespackaged software revenue. Appendix C describes the Competitive Market Map(CMM) methodology.In addition, please note the following:! The information contained in this study was derived from the IDC Software Market Forecaster database as of June 23, 2008.! All numbers in this document may not be exact due to rounding.! For more information on IDCs software definitions and methodology, see IDCs Software Taxonomy, 2008 (IDC #210828, February 2008).Primary Markets CoveredThe study presents revenue and shares for the following primary markets as well asworldwide totals:! Application development and deployment (AD&D)! Applications! System infrastructure software (SIS)Vendor and Market SegmentationGeographic RegionsWith regard to software product demand, three distinct geographical regions areconsidered in each vendors revenue:! Americas! Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (EMEA)! Asia/PacificEach segment is defined in the software market glossary in Appendix B.©2008 IDC #213259 1
  6. 6. Operating EnvironmentsMarket revenue and forecasts are also segmented by operating environment.Operating environments are defined collections of discrete hardware platforms and/oroperating systems. The operating environments for this study are as follows:! Mainframe! Unix! Linux and other open source! Windows 32 and 64! Other (includes i5 and OS/400, other host/server, embedded, other single user, and hardware appliances)Each operating environment is defined in Appendix B.Software Market TaxonomyThis studys software market glossary (see Appendix B), which is extracted fromIDCs Software Taxonomy, 2008 (IDC #210828, February 2008), presents afunctional view of the worldwide software market. IDC defines functional markets interms of the features, functions, and attributes of the software package, not theproblem being solved or the industry into which the software is deployed. In IDCssoftware market taxonomy, the worldwide software market is divided into 81functional markets.The market information contained in this study is part of IDCs global software marketcoverage. The Related Research section of this study references companion IDCstudies that go into greater detail and depth in analyzing individual software markets.Executive SummaryThe Packaged Software Market in 2007Worldwide revenue increased from $231.1 billion in 2006 to $262.7 billion in 2007, anannual increase of 13.7%. Figure 1 illustrates 2007 software revenue by primarymarket and geographic region.Table 1 shows the 2007 revenue totals of the worldwide packaged software marketby geographic region and primary market. The Americas (North America and LatinAmerica) continued to account for over one-half (51.3%) of worldwide packagedsoftware consumption. EMEA, aided by the strong euro, accounted over one-third(34.3%) of worldwide revenue in 2007. Asia/Pacific (including Japan) accounted forthe remaining 14.4% share of worldwide software revenue in 2007.The applications primary market continued to account for nearly one-half of worldwidepackaged software revenue, with 48.6% share in 2007 (down fractionally from 48.9%in 2006). SIS captured the second-largest share of worldwide revenue at 28.5%, withAD&D contributing the remaining 22.9%.2 #213259 ©2008 IDC
  7. 7. FIGURE 1Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Primary Market andRegion, 2007 Application development and deployment Applications System infrastructure software 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 ($B) Americas EMEA Asia/PacificSource: IDC, 2008 T ABLE 1 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Region and Primary Market, 2007 Revenue ($M) Share of Primary Market (%) Americas Application development and deployment 29,987 49.8 Applications 68,260 53.5 System infrastructure software 36,417 48.6 Subtotal 134,664 51.3 EMEA Application development and deployment 21,754 36.1 Applications 43,725 34.3 System infrastructure software 24,671 32.9 Subtotal 90,150 34.3 Asia/Pacific Application development and deployment 8,494 14.1 Applications 15,592 12.2 System infrastructure software 13,830 18.5 Subtotal 37,916 14.4 Worldwide Application development and deployment 60,236 100.0 Applications 127,576 100.0 System infrastructure software 74,918 100.0 Total 262,731 100.0 Source: IDC, 2008©2008 IDC #213259 3
  8. 8. Worldwide Software Market Drivers, 2008–2012IDC published a number of predictions studies in late 2007 and early 2008 withanalysts views on the software market drivers for 2008 and beyond. Of course, thecurrent macroeconomic climate, particularly but not exclusively in the United States,continues to be extremely volatile, with gasoline now over $4.00 a gallon, the ongoingweakness of the dollar, and the housing market crisis. Nevertheless, thesepredictions still provide important context for forecasting the software marketplace.Key predictions excerpted from these documents include:! IT suppliers will focus on hypergrowth emerging markets: "BRIC+9" and SMB. The 2008 forecast for cooling growth in worldwide IT spending will continue to drive the industrys major players to concentrate on high-growth emerging markets, with increasing investments in two key areas: # In emerging economies, led by the BRIC countries — and the next nine important emerging markets — all growing at two to three times the market average # In the SMB segment, in developed and developing economies, growing at 8–10% worldwide (SMB specialists in the IT market will be prime acquisition and partnering candidates.)! Eureka 2.0 applications will emerge that aggregate, categorize, mine, and analyze user behavior. The rising cacophony of crowds is already driving new applications that mine user behavior. As the din becomes unbearable, both users and vendors will try to make sense of too much information by looking for patterns and clues that distinguish one person or query from another. Happily for this market, business intelligence and categorization and search or matching engines become the key to discerning the differences. We dub these new applications — recommendation engines, user data mining in real time, real-time trend analysis, and personalized search results based on predicted similarities of interest and behavior — Eureka 2.0. These applications mine and harness the wisdom of crowds, based on the contextual and social aspects of information work and information exchange. Social networking services and application vendors will recognize the power of combining the information, relationships, and conversations they capture with powerful mining, clustering, matching, and recommendation engines. This combination will give end users a powerful information discovery platform that leverages trusted relationships with other people to filter and rank information.! SOA will become more critical in forming the foundation for provisioning and consuming services. When SOA started gaining popularity some years back, many individuals and enterprises approached it (and still do) as an integration paradigm. The idea of services being provisioned and sourced anywhere to be called upon, composed, and consumed anywhere is helping drive and converge SOA activities within the world of software as a service (SaaS). IDC believes that enterprises will become even more interested in adopting SOA constructs to take advantage of services being sourced from a variety of parties, especially external services on demand. What is important to4 #213259 ©2008 IDC
  9. 9. note is that many organizations that may have not yet jumped on the SOA bandwagon for a variety of reasons may be compelled to do so in order to best leverage such on-demand services and sourcing options. Second, many on- demand application and services providers that entered the market without following SOA architectural tenets or upholding industry standards such as Web services will be rapidly adjusting and enhancing their offerings in order to compete for customers demanding more integration and support capabilities, and to provide what is necessary to build out a rich ecosystem of partners to build out more integrated solutions and drive business their way.! Application pairing strategies (deep vertical applications combined with best-of-breed functional applications) will become the dominant bundling strategy for reaching enterprise and midmarket customers. Last year, IDC predicted that customer demand for application software that is more ready to use would drive software vendors to offer even more specific vertical solutions as derivatives of their product suites, referred to as microverticalization. That has now become the mainstream strategy for many enterprise vendors as they have continued to develop or acquire more and deeper vertical software and intellectual capital. In addition, most enterprise vendors have released SOA- enabled versions of their applications. These two factors combined, customer demand for microvertical solutions and easier integration due to SOA capabilities, have led to a different go-to-market approach from many vendors. Instead of leading with the more "core" ERP applications in a sales situation, the approach is often to lead with the microvertical solution.! Ecosystem owners will make content management an integral part of their stack — the next step in the natural evolution of content management to infrastructure service. Ecosystem owners have staked their claims and placed their bets over the past few years (culminating in a cascade of large acquisitions in 2006) in content management. As everyone is well aware, the lions share of the information in the enterprise exists outside of the rows and columns of relational databases and the enterprise applications that run on top of them. Managing unstructured information — business documents; rich media such as images, audio, and video; email and other communications; and so forth — has risen to the top of the compliance agenda. In 2008, content collaboration and transactional content come to the fore in customer agendas. Aiding and abetting this is the rise of video and other rich media in the enterprise for executive communications to employees, training and certification business processes, and employee collaboration, whether via videoconferencing or via on-demand replay of captured meetings — all of which creates fresh demand for content technologies that can help classify, index, manage, and find relevant information. Vendors have already begun to lay the foundation. In 2008, loosely coupled solutions will start to morph into platforms that implement content awareness at the API and Web services levels at different tiers of the stack. It will take a few more years for a fully integrated platform for structured and unstructured information to emerge, but well see the outlines in 2008.! Consolidation will continue as large IT vendors continue to extend their versions of the information access and management platform by acquiring smaller, specialized technology companies. Acquisitions in this space have©2008 IDC #213259 5
  10. 10. often involved a fairly large vendor, such as FileNet, Cognos, Hyperion, or Stellent, being acquired by an even larger vendor, such as IBM or Oracle. The next phase for information access and analysis consolidation will shift to the acquisition of innovative start-ups by bigger players. Large software vendors will continue to extend their versions of the information access and analysis platform by acquiring smaller, specialized technology companies. These smaller vendors provide missing pieces to the larger vendors offerings. The business model for many of these start-ups has acquisition, not world domination, as the end game.! Business process management will be increasingly viewed as a must-have despite the gloomy economy. While many signals indicate a slower IT spending climate in 2008, that doesnt mean all software will be equally affected. IDC believes that business process management suite (BPMS) software is one area likely to experience positive, counter-cyclical growth.! Automation will play an important role as IT organizations control costs, improve service delivery, meet compliance regulations, and manage virtual resources. Automation will play an increasingly critical role as IT organizations strive to control costs, improve service delivery, meet compliance requirements, and manage virtualized resources. Automation will range from simple tactical task-based applications to sophisticated policy-driven solutions. Expect traditional systems management software vendors to increasingly compete on several fronts, including run book automation, workload scheduling and automation, and end-to-end datacenter automation. Automated management of virtualized resources will grow as IT organizations look for automated control of increasingly dynamic infrastructures. Another area to watch is automated management of infrastructure to achieve power and cooling operating efficiencies. One outcome to watch carefully is the strong potential for increased merger and acquisition activities, particularly on the part of large companies to acquire smaller point product vendors, as the giants try to accelerate the filling out of their automation portfolios.! IT portfolio management will provide the missing application life-cycle management link — IT governance will emerge. Key product capabilities for IT portfolio management will deepen, enabling global 2000 executives the ability to leverage quantitative input from testing, software change, and configuration management and requirements tools to evolve qualitative decision making and to better prioritize the IT project portfolio. Emerging IT governance (ITG) or the integration between IT asset portfolio management tools and IT project portfolio management tools will enable coordination across IT and operational teams to facilitate corporate planning across these key areas. Alliances between existing ITPM vendors and/or tighter integration with internally owned asset portfolio management tools will extend beyond those that have already integrated products and occur during the 2008–2010 time frame.! System management vendors will partner with nonmanagement vendors for virtual application life-cycle management, generating industry buzz and revenue. System management vendors have partnered with application, virtualization, hardware, and services vendors for technology acquisition as well as to extend the reach of their channels to customers. What is different here is6 #213259 ©2008 IDC
  11. 11. that these relationships will leverage the acquisition/consolidation boom in other software markets to provide a management console to leverage an end-to-end view of the service being delivered to that customer.! Virtualization will move from a technology discussion to a broader business value discussion and will come to be known as "virtualization across the enterprise." For much of the industry, the most exciting story around virtualization software has been mostly focused on server consolidation and reducing physical footprints and the resulting hardware acquisition cost reductions, resulting in lower power and cooling costs. During 2008, watch for customers to begin upleveling their virtualization road maps from a relatively simplistic technology play to a more comprehensive and longer-term end-to-end adoption road map that will impact servers, clients, storage, and even network architectures over the next decade. Simply stated, virtualization begins a process that will extend this technology phenomenon far beyond its current general role as a tool for server consolidation. Live migration, or the ability to move virtual servers to alternate computing resources while running, is a trend that will lead virtualization platform providers to accelerate their capabilities in performance management, process automation, disaster recovery, application awareness, change and configuration management, and lab automation. This solutions- based approach will also drive deeper and tighter collaborations between hypervisor providers and ISVs, via partnerships and integration with leading vendors in the storage software, network I/O virtualization, and application market segments. Ultimately, this approach will become known as "virtualization across the enterprise" and will be seen as the foundation for true service-centric computing through the use of policy-based automation software to coordinate between the server, storage, network, and user client access devices and end- user software.! Software appliances will move beyond an application delivery form factor and become a new medium for competitive differentiation, accomplishing previously difficult tasks such as aggregation of unused processor and storage resources. Last year, IDC predicted that software appliances would become a household word in corporate IT. We believe that prediction has, for the most part, come true. Our expectations for software appliance adoption are for basic network and Web infrastructure appliances to lead the curve, followed by network-oriented solutions such as PBX solutions, with business-oriented software appliances taking a secondary role in terms of the overall volume of adoption. Security software appliances will be a hot ticket, but an emerging new class of infrastructure software appliances will make a strong showing for themselves. These software appliances will include devices that aggregate resources that are either underutilized or totally unavailable from existing infrastructure configurations.! Open source software will increasingly impact business decisions. Open source software is continuing to drive innovation in the application development software market and is influencing business decisions and shifting fundamental approaches to software creation. While users are now beginning to seriously address content and license management issues, vendors are evaluating OSS leverage, opportunities, and challenges. Traditional software development©2008 IDC #213259 7
  12. 12. strategies dominate, but they are changing. Hybrid business models emerging now will evolve further and solidify over the next several years. Competing with free is always difficult. The result is declining prices in one context but potential leverage in others.! 2008 wont be the year of the Linux desktop in the conventional sense, but the combination of new form factor client devices, client OS virtualization, and application virtualization will open the door for Linux to serve other emerging needs. 2008 wont be the year of the Linux desktop, again — at least not as in the form factor of a Windows Vista killer. However, if you look beyond the traditional PC form factor and consider deployments like client-focused software appliances, thin-client operating systems, and server-hosted client operating system deployments, or even in related form factors such as an appliance built on Linux designed to run on Intel VPro, you may just find that the year of the Linux desktop is beginning to happen. While we still dont expect any "big bang" for the entry of Linux into the client market (and lets not forget there was never any "big bang" for Linux on the server side), we do expect to see Linux on the client side continuing to gain momentum.! Unified communications (UC) will start transforming business applications and telephony in 2008. After two years of supply-side marketing from vendors, customers will start implementing UC solutions to transform business applications and telephony in 2008. These customers will be looking to provide their users with an integrated user experience for unified messaging (email, fax, and voice messaging), online presence, instant messaging, Web audio and videoconferencing, and VoIP calling/IP telephony/call routing, and so on using a variety of PC and wireless devices. While many UC applications have been deployed individually over the past decade, gains in unified user interfaces, VoIP call control, network-delivered presence, and other advances have provided the glue to bind these applications together so that users can share, collaborate, discuss, store, search, and talk within a rich unified user experience. The transformation will begin simultaneously in two distinct areas of the organization: within the knowledge workers communication environment and within the contact center.See the Learn More section of this study for an extensive listing of IDCs predictionsdocuments.SITUATION OVERVIEWWorldwide Software Market Performancein 2007Table 2 shows a ranking of the top 100 worldwide software vendors by revenue andmarket share. Table 3 lists the worldwide software vendors in alphabetical order. Aview of the key software vendors and their key market shares in the worldwidepackaged software market by region is provided in Table 4.8 #213259 ©2008 IDC
  13. 13. This study also includes revenue data for each of the three primary markets: AD&D,applications, and SIS. AD&D revenue is covered in Tables 5–7. Applications revenueis covered in Tables 8–10. Similarly, SIS revenue is displayed in Tables 11–13. Foreach of these primary markets, we provide a list of the top 50 vendors (by 2007market share) and then list all vendors alphabetically with worldwide revenue and bygeographic region.IDC calculates market share by dividing each vendors 2007 software revenue by thetotal 2007 worldwide software revenue for the market sector analyzed. Rank is alsoprovided and based on vendors with reported software revenue. A few of the vendorsin last years study either departed from the software business (or from a specificprimary market segment) or were not able to identify software revenue; the result is adash entry for 2007 revenue and "NA" for 2006–2007 growth. Tables 5–13 arespecific to primary markets rather than the total software market.Performance of Leading Vendors in 2007Microsoft, IBM, Oracle, SAP, Symantec, HP, EMC, CA, Siemens, and Adobe werethe 10 leading vendors in the worldwide software market in 2007. There was nochange in ranking from 2006 for these leading vendors. Collectively, these 10 leadingvendors account for 45.7% of total worldwide packaged software revenue.Additionally:! It is important to note that the 2006 rankings are based on Table 2 in this study, not on what was published last year, because divestitures, mergers and acquisitions, and other updated information invalidate comparisons using the 2006 data from previous studies.! To improve consistency between the Worldwide Software Market Forecaster database (the source of the data contained within this study) and IDC regional software trackers, IDC has removed all security hardware appliance revenue from the Worldwide Software Market Forecaster database (revenue that was previously included). Security appliance revenue will continue to be tracked in IDCs Security Appliance Tracker and in selected other worldwide reports. This adjustment had the biggest impact on the secure content and threat management market, where approximately 40% of total revenue in 2007 was related to security appliances.! See Appendix A for information regarding the treatment and impact of currency exchange rates on the data contained in this study.Competitive Market MapsThe Competitive Market Map is an IDC tool for evaluating the competitive position ofsoftware vendors in an increasingly complex market. The CMM is a tool that permitsquantitative competitive analysis based on four variables: size, scope, momentum,and reliance. The definitions of these variables are contained in Appendix C.©2008 IDC #213259 9
  14. 14. Competitive Market Maps including the top 10 vendors in each primary market arepresented in Figures 2–4. Common to all of these CMMs is the effect of marketconsolidation. The size of the "bubbles" for the leading one or two vendors in all threeprimary markets dwarf those of the rest of the vendors in the top 10. Continuingconsolidation in the software industry is clearly in evidence.FIGURE 2Application Development and Deployment CompetitiveMarket Map SAS Cognos Business Objects BEA HP CA Sybase Size: Measure of a vendor’s software revenue in selected market Momentum: Size adjusted annual software growth rate for selected market Reliance (color): A vendor’s dependence on selected software revenue: grey = 0–24%, yellow = 25–49%, orange = 50–74%, red = 75–100% Diversity: Measure of the breadth and depth of product offerings within selected software marketSource: IDC, 200810 #213259 ©2008 IDC
  15. 15. FIGURE 3Applications Competitive Market Map Adobe IBM Sage Group Autodesk Siemens Intuit Infor Size: Measure of a vendor’s software revenue in selected market Momentum: Size adjusted annual software growth rate for selected market Reliance (color): A vendor’s dependence on selected software revenue: grey = 0–24%, yellow = 25–49%, orange = 50–74%, red = 75–100% Diversity: Measure of the breadth and depth of product offerings within selected software marketSource: IDC, 2008©2008 IDC #213259 11
  16. 16. FIGURE 4System Infrastructure Software Competitive Market Map VMware Symantec Citrix EMC CA HP McAfee Sun Size: Measure of a vendor’s software revenue in selected market Momentum: Size adjusted annual software growth rate for selected market Reliance (color): A vendor’s dependence on selected software revenue: Grey = 0–24%, yellow = 25–49%, orange = 50–74%, red = 75–100% Diversity: Measure of the breadth and depth of product offerings within selected software marketSource: IDC, 2008Top 50 Vendors Shares of the Worldwide Software Market byOperating EnvironmentTable 14 presents the top 50 software vendors worldwide by total software revenuesegmented by major operating environments. For situations in which packages arelicensed to multiple platforms, IDC allocates revenue to the primary server platform,thus potentially understating client-side revenue, particularly in the applicationsprimary market.12 #213259 ©2008 IDC
  17. 17. Worldwide Performance in 2007 by Primary MarketApplication Development and DeploymentThe AD&D markets include software products used for the development anddeployment of applications. There are two major subdivisions of the AD&D primarymarket:! Software products that full-time professional developers use to develop and deploy applications! Data access, analysis, and delivery products that are end user–oriented tools for ad hoc data access, analysis, and reportingIn the aggregate, the worldwide AD&D software functional markets generated vendorrevenue of $60.2 billion in 2007, a healthy increase of 11.7% from the 2006 total of$53.9 billion, as shown in Table 5, which also presents the top 50 AD&D vendorsranked in order of 2007 worldwide revenue. The top 50 AD&D vendors accounted foran 81.7% share of the total AD&D market in 2007, essentially unchanged from 2006.Table 6 provides a list of the leading vendors in the worldwide AD&D market inalphabetical order.The Americas (predominantly the United States) accounts for the largest share ofAD&D revenue. As shown in Table 7, 2007 revenue for the Americas region was$30.0 billion, which equates to a 49.8% share of the overall worldwide AD&D markettotal. EMEA was the second-largest market, with a 36.1% share in 2007, followed byAsia/Pacific at 14.1%.ApplicationsThis market consists of both business and consumer applications. Businessapplications, in turn, consist of enterprise applications and nonenterprise businessapplications, such as collaborative, content management, authoring and publishing,and search and discovery applications. In 2007, the packaged applications marketgrew a healthy 12.8% to $127.6 billion from the 2006 total of $113.1 billion (see Table8). Table 9 provides a list of the leading vendors in the worldwide applications marketin alphabetical order. As illustrated in Table 10, the Americas consumes the largestshare of applications software, accounting for a 53.5% share in 2007.System Infrastructure SoftwareThe total SIS market accounted for $74.9 billion in revenue for 2007, up 16.8% from$64.1 billion in 2006, as shown in Table 11. Table 12 provides a list of the leadingvendors in the worldwide SIS market in alphabetical order. As in the other primarymarkets, the Americas accounted for the largest share of SIS consumption in 2007 at48.6% of the worldwide total (see Table 13).©2008 IDC #213259 13
  18. 18. T ABLE 2 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Top 100 Vendors, 2005–2007 ($M) 2006–2007 2007 2007 2005 2006 2007 Growth (%) Share (%) Rank Microsoft 35,541 37,346 46,091 23.4 17.543 1 IBM 18,720 20,035 21,824 8.9 8.306 2 Oracle 12,444 14,682 17,128 16.7 6.519 3 SAP 7,550 8,338 10,188 22.2 3.878 4 Symantec 5,166 5,135 5,448 6.1 2.074 5 HP 4,392 4,469 4,612 3.2 1.755 6 EMC 3,491 3,637 3,938 8.3 1.499 7 CA 3,588 3,584 3,825 6.7 1.456 8 Siemens 3,333 3,496 3,808 8.9 1.449 9 Adobe 2,415 2,525 3,093 22.5 1.177 10 Fujitsu 2,285 2,250 2,270 0.9 0.864 11 Sage Group 1,720 1,869 2,172 16.2 0.827 12 Autodesk 1,454 1,815 2,060 13.5 0.784 13 SAS 1,531 1,731 1,957 13.0 0.745 14 Sun Microsystems 1,661 1,787 1,799 0.7 0.685 15 Infor 1,551 1,656 1,781 7.5 0.678 16 Cisco 1,130 1,456 1,762 21.0 0.671 17 Intuit 1,352 1,425 1,581 10.9 0.602 18 BMC 1,396 1,473 1,577 7.1 0.600 19 Dassault Systemes 1,054 1,127 1,486 31.9 0.566 20 Cadence Design Systems 1,203 1,350 1,470 8.8 0.559 21 SunGard 1,238 1,358 1,452 7.0 0.553 22 Hitachi 1,357 1,349 1,429 6.0 0.544 23 Citrix 809 1,057 1,392 31.7 0.530 24 BEA 1,100 1,227 1,325 8.0 0.504 25 Business Objects 1,083 1,179 1,299 10.2 0.494 26 VMware Inc. 363 684 1,283 87.5 0.488 27 McAfee 952 1,065 1,183 11.1 0.450 28 Vivendi 526 696 1,156 66.1 0.440 29 Synopsys 943 1,042 1,153 10.7 0.439 30 McKessonHBOC 1,000 1,085 1,149 5.9 0.437 31 Network Appliance 501 747 992 32.9 0.378 32 Avaya Inc. 879 872 973 11.6 0.370 33 NEC 850 886 967 9.1 0.368 34 Cognos 759 832 931 11.9 0.354 35 Sybase 768 858 912 6.3 0.347 36 Apple 722 715 910 27.3 0.346 37 Fiserv 744 818 893 9.1 0.340 38 Trend Micro 622 713 826 15.9 0.314 39 Misys 696 706 762 7.9 0.290 40 Mentor Graphics 600 673 747 11.0 0.284 41 Compuware 733 740 738 -0.3 0.281 42 Teradata 630 655 735 12.4 0.280 43 PTC 644 729 704 -3.4 0.268 44 Software AG 549 599 701 17.0 0.267 45 Cerner 592 673 700 3.9 0.266 46 Novell 704 647 692 7.0 0.263 4714 #213259 ©2008 IDC
  19. 19. T ABLE 2 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Top 100 Vendors, 2005–2007 ($M) 2006–2007 2007 2007 2005 2006 2007 Growth (%) Share (%) Rank Nortel Networks 631 674 667 -1.0 0.254 48 Fair Isaac 650 680 664 -2.3 0.253 49 Quest Software 472 562 631 12.4 0.240 50 Salesforce.com 281 452 616 36.4 0.234 51 SWIFT 532 569 610 7.2 0.232 52 Check Point Software Technologies 493 522 591 13.2 0.225 53 Intergraph 449 496 581 17.0 0.221 54 ESRI 465 516 570 10.5 0.217 55 Nuance Communications Inc. 401 473 551 16.5 0.210 56 Reynolds & Reynolds 500 500 542 8.3 0.206 57 Open Text Corp. 547 535 540 1.0 0.205 58 Electronic Arts 403 544 533 -2.1 0.203 59 Sterling Commerce 399 434 501 15.4 0.191 60 TIBCO Inc. 382 429 480 11.8 0.183 61 Unisys 531 474 461 -2.9 0.175 62 Verint Systems 209 374 458 22.4 0.174 63 Attachmate 387 417 458 9.9 0.174 64 Aspect Software 510 449 457 1.9 0.174 65 Autonomy 259 357 456 27.6 0.173 66 Lawson Software 359 363 444 22.4 0.169 67 Progress Software Corp. 386 411 442 7.6 0.168 68 Red Hat Inc. 242 333 424 27.2 0.161 69 GXS 400 390 390 0.0 0.148 70 Micros Systems 259 348 388 11.5 0.148 71 Bentley Systems Inc. 286 306 377 23.4 0.143 72 Kronos Inc. 293 318 375 17.9 0.143 73 Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories 280 311 367 18.0 0.140 74 Pitney Bowes Distribution Solutions 324 342 366 7.0 0.139 75 ASG 309 329 345 4.9 0.131 76 Amdocs 270 297 337 13.3 0.128 77 Informatica 259 286 326 14.1 0.124 78 DATEV eG 289 294 323 10.1 0.123 79 Websense 249 294 312 6.3 0.119 80 Activant Solutions Inc. 216 223 311 39.7 0.118 81 ADP 283 286 305 6.7 0.116 82 Eclipsys 249 278 300 8.0 0.114 83 Ansys Inc. 122 203 297 45.9 0.113 84 HDS 304 273 294 7.8 0.112 85 NICE SYSTEMS 216 269 291 8.2 0.111 86 ACI Worldwide 261 281 279 -0.4 0.106 87 Exact Holding NV 239 247 278 12.8 0.106 88 Aspen Technology 209 252 277 9.7 0.105 89 Unit4 Agresso NV 212 238 271 14.0 0.103 90 Epicor Software Corp. 212 250 270 8.1 0.103 91 Invensys 255 267 268 0.6 0.102 92 MicroStrategy 216 249 266 6.6 0.101 93 Metavante Corp. 152 160 265 65.5 0.101 94©2008 IDC #213259 15
  20. 20. T ABLE 2 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Top 100 Vendors, 2005–2007 ($M) 2006–2007 2007 2007 2005 2006 2007 Growth (%) Share (%) Rank Jack Henry & Associates 180 243 263 8.4 0.100 95 SPSS 210 234 262 12.0 0.100 96 VeriSign Inc. 225 253 260 2.8 0.099 97 SERENA Software 240 236 257 9.3 0.098 98 Information Builders Inc. 250 250 255 2.0 0.097 99 JDA Software Group Inc. 173 216 252 16.4 0.096 100 Subtotal 150,465 162,772 186,976 14.9 71.166 Other 62,032 68,334 75,755 10.9 28.834 Total 212,498 231,106 262,731 13.7 100.000 Source: IDC, 2008 T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M) 2006–2007 2007 Share 2005 2006 2007 Growth (%) (%) 2007 Rank 29West – – 2 NA 0.001 958 3M 20 23 26 13.0 0.010 430 4CS 7 9 10 7.5 0.004 672 4D Inc. 33 35 38 6.1 0.014 364 Abacus Research AG 16 17 19 9.9 0.007 508 ABB Ltd. 62 70 84 19.6 0.032 217 ABC Systems 6 7 7 8.9 0.003 749 Able Commerce 6 6 4 -41.6 0.001 898 Accela 10 14 20 42.9 0.008 489 Accellion 1 5 6 24.4 0.002 808 Accelrys 43 41 41 -0.2 0.016 340 Accountpro 4 4 5 7.7 0.002 848 Accruent 23 26 28 7.7 0.011 417 AccuRev 5 8 8 2.6 0.003 728 ACI Worldwide 261 281 279 -0.4 0.106 87 Acronis 20 51 92 82.0 0.035 204 Actek 5 5 6 9.4 0.002 802 Activant Solutions Inc. 216 223 311 39.7 0.118 81 Active Endpoints Inc. 1 3 5 66.7 0.002 833 Active Voice 22 26 31 19.2 0.012 397 ActivIdentity 45 50 52 3.5 0.020 292 Activision Inc. 193 125 150 19.3 0.057 137 Actuate Corp. 106 110 124 12.8 0.047 161 Acxiom Digital 33 36 39 9.8 0.015 356 ADAM Software 0 1 3 120.6 0.001 932 Adexa 27 28 30 7.7 0.012 403 Aditro Group 90 95 105 11.4 0.040 180 Adobe 2,415 2,525 3,093 22.5 1.177 1016 #213259 ©2008 IDC
  21. 21. T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M) 2006–2007 2007 Share 2005 2006 2007 Growth (%) (%) 2007 Rank ADP 283 286 305 6.7 0.116 82 Advanced Data Exchange 7 8 9 10.5 0.003 701 Advanced Visual Systems 10 11 13 13.9 0.005 614 Advent Software 112 127 161 27.5 0.061 133 Advizor Solutions 7 9 10 12.1 0.004 651 Ahnlab Inc. 37 44 48 8.5 0.018 303 Aim Technology 3 6 7 9.4 0.002 774 Akonix 7 9 10 13.3 0.004 656 Aladdin Knowledge Systems 82 89 105 18.5 0.040 179 AlarmPoint 2 2 2 6.2 0.001 952 Alcatel Lucent 192 210 228 8.4 0.087 104 Alchemy Software Development Ltd. 2 3 3 26.2 0.001 910 Aldata Solution 40 57 43 -24.2 0.016 326 Aldon 15 16 18 9.8 0.007 521 Aleri – 1 3 500.0 0.001 911 Algor Inc. 12 12 13 6.6 0.005 598 Algorithmics Inc. 67 75 100 33.3 0.038 189 Alibre Inc. 4 4 4 -9.3 0.001 882 Allegro Development Corp. 14 15 20 35.7 0.008 487 Alloy Software 1 1 2 42.9 0.001 957 Allscripts 64 86 103 20.0 0.039 183 Allume Systems 6 6 6 4.1 0.002 783 AlmavivA 22 17 18 5.1 0.007 520 Altair Engineering Inc. 25 28 29 6.3 0.011 408 Altova 11 11 12 6.6 0.005 621 Amano Cincinnati 10 12 13 9.3 0.005 601 Amdocs 270 297 337 13.3 0.128 77 American Software 40 45 49 8.4 0.019 298 ANGOSS Software International Ltd. 4 5 6 14.4 0.002 810 Ansys Inc. 122 203 297 45.9 0.113 84 AnyDoc 9 10 10 4.2 0.004 669 AOL/Mapquest 70 73 79 8.8 0.030 229 Aonix 7 7 7 5.8 0.003 752 API Software 8 10 10 9.4 0.004 652 Appfluent Inc. 5 5 7 60.0 0.003 758 APPGEN Business Software 13 14 15 7.6 0.006 576 Appian 18 20 25 25.0 0.010 439 Apple 722 715 910 27.3 0.346 37 Applied Innovation Management 5 5 6 8.2 0.002 807 Applied Materials 17 18 19 6.1 0.007 498 Applied Systems Inc. 92 96 100 3.7 0.038 188 Applied Voice & Speech Technologies 26 29 34 17.2 0.013 380 Applimation 18 25 40 60.0 0.015 350 Aprimo Corp. 15 27 34 25.5 0.013 381 AptSoft 3 5 6 20.0 0.002 794 Aquitec International 6 6 6 9.6 0.002 781 Arcplan 24 26 29 11.0 0.011 410©2008 IDC #213259 17
  22. 22. T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M) 2006–2007 2007 Share 2005 2006 2007 Growth (%) (%) 2007 Rank ArcSight 42 54 81 50.0 0.031 225 Arena 16 18 13 -28.3 0.005 610 Argo Data Resource Corp. 18 19 20 4.5 0.008 492 Argos Systems 1 1 1 -56.3 0.000 974 ARI Network 8 8 9 15.6 0.003 695 Ariba Inc. 174 168 163 -2.8 0.062 132 Art Technology Group 71 72 96 32.6 0.037 195 ARTiSAN Software 6 8 9 11.8 0.003 690 ASA International 20 19 19 0.0 0.007 504 Ascentis 7 8 8 9.4 0.003 710 Ascentn 2 4 11 181.3 0.004 635 ASCON 11 12 18 45.0 0.007 518 ASG 309 329 345 4.9 0.131 76 Aspect Software 510 449 457 1.9 0.174 65 Aspen Technology 209 252 277 9.7 0.105 89 Assetlink 3 3 6 82.5 0.002 796 Astea International 14 13 20 53.2 0.008 480 Asure 12 16 18 9.4 0.007 525 AT Kearney Procurement Solutions 11 12 13 10.4 0.005 599 Atempo 30 31 41 32.3 0.016 343 ATOSS Software AG 15 16 20 23.5 0.008 482 Atrion International 15 16 18 9.1 0.007 526 Attachmate 387 417 458 9.9 0.174 64 Attest 3 3 4 8.7 0.001 895 Attunity 14 10 9 -7.9 0.004 683 Augeo Software 7 7 7 5.8 0.003 747 Authoria 28 29 35 22.8 0.013 372 Autodesk 1,454 1,815 2,060 13.5 0.784 13 Autonomy 259 357 456 27.6 0.173 66 Autotask 2 2 3 10.5 0.001 935 Auto-trol Technology 4 4 5 45.7 0.002 819 Avaya Inc. 879 872 973 11.6 0.370 33 AVEVA Group 98 124 179 44.1 0.068 126 AVG Technologies (Former Grisoft) 29 38 42 13.0 0.016 333 Avocent 84 93 91 -1.6 0.035 207 Avolent Inc. 14 15 12 -18.3 0.005 626 Axway 85 110 127 15.9 0.048 159 Ayanova (Ground Zero Tech-Works Inc.) 2 2 2 7.5 0.001 939 B & L Associates 11 11 12 5.9 0.005 623 B2 Systems Inc. 3 4 4 9.9 0.002 881 Backbase 3 5 5 6.5 0.002 827 Backweb 7 8 7 -9.1 0.003 751 BakBone Software 43 51 56 8.8 0.021 277 BancTec Inc. 89 96 103 7.3 0.039 185 BasWare 34 49 69 41.5 0.026 250 Baxter Planning Systems Inc. 7 7 8 6.7 0.003 721 BEA 1,100 1,227 1,325 8.0 0.504 2518 #213259 ©2008 IDC
  23. 23. T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M) 2006–2007 2007 Share 2005 2006 2007 Growth (%) (%) 2007 Rank Beeline 35 41 45 9.4 0.017 316 Bentley Systems Inc. 286 306 377 23.4 0.143 72 Beta Systems Software AG 110 92 97 5.3 0.037 192 BEZ Systems Inc. 3 3 3 6.1 0.001 900 BigFix Inc. 18 29 42 45.6 0.016 337 Birdstep Technology 7 8 16 102.6 0.006 557 Bison 21 24 22 -8.9 0.008 471 Blackbaud 108 125 157 26.4 0.060 135 Blackboard 120 160 213 32.9 0.081 109 Bladelogic 18 37 71 91.0 0.027 246 BlueCielo ECM Solutions 10 9 10 8.1 0.004 657 Bluegarden AS 16 17 17 4.8 0.007 530 Blueprint 1 2 2 9.5 0.001 946 Bluespring Software 5 11 13 19.0 0.005 616 BMC 1,396 1,473 1,577 7.1 0.600 19 Bond International 18 22 26 17.9 0.010 427 Boothroyd Dewhurst 1 1 1 -12.9 0.000 966 Borland Software Corp. 182 211 196 -7.1 0.074 114 Bottomline Technologies 69 70 105 48.7 0.040 181 BR Solutions 2 2 3 11.4 0.001 923 Bradmark Technologies Inc. 5 5 8 45.9 0.003 719 BravoSolution 5 8 7 -15.2 0.003 765 Broadlane 13 14 16 10.5 0.006 555 BroadVision 41 40 44 9.8 0.017 322 Brooks Automation 94 86 92 7.3 0.035 205 BSP 28 30 32 3.8 0.012 393 Bull SAS 122 120 127 6.0 0.048 160 Business Objects 1,083 1,179 1,299 10.2 0.494 26 CA 3,588 3,584 3,825 6.7 1.456 8 Cactus Commerce 5 6 6 10.5 0.002 788 Cadence Design Systems 1,203 1,350 1,470 8.8 0.559 21 CalAmp 5 5 6 6.1 0.002 815 Callidus Software Inc. 35 50 64 29.2 0.024 259 Calypso Technology 18 22 24 10.0 0.009 444 Cambar Software 2 2 6 160.9 0.002 797 Campus Management Corp. 20 24 25 4.2 0.010 436 Camstar Systems Inc. 37 54 57 6.3 0.022 275 Cape Clear 16 21 28 35.6 0.011 420 Captaris Inc. 85 97 70 -27.8 0.027 249 CAS GmbH 22 25 26 4.1 0.010 432 Casewise 3 4 4 11.8 0.002 861 Cassatt 2 2 2 7.6 0.001 954 Cast Iron Systems 3 4 6 25.3 0.002 813 CCH 35 38 40 7.2 0.015 347 CCK Financial Solutions Ltd. 6 6 7 12.4 0.003 763 CDC Corp. 152 160 137 -14.6 0.052 146 Cegedim 167 182 216 18.9 0.082 106©2008 IDC #213259 19
  24. 24. T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M) 2006–2007 2007 Share 2005 2006 2007 Growth (%) (%) 2007 Rank Cegid SA 143 155 185 19.2 0.070 120 Celerity Solutions 2 3 1 -43.6 0.001 962 Centennial Software 11 14 19 35.7 0.007 506 Centive Systems 17 20 23 15.0 0.009 459 Centric Software 10 11 8 -21.1 0.003 708 Ceridian 71 76 82 7.9 0.031 221 Cerner 592 673 700 3.9 0.266 46 Certicom Corp. 10 13 17 35.4 0.006 537 Cezanne Software Inc. 5 7 8 8.3 0.003 731 CGI Information Systems 106 106 115 9.1 0.044 172 Channel Advisor 9 12 13 10.5 0.005 597 Chase Cooper 8 15 16 7.3 0.006 551 Check Free Corp. 100 128 145 13.1 0.055 141 Check Point Software Technologies 493 522 591 13.2 0.225 53 Chordiant Software Inc. 64 75 90 20.6 0.034 210 Cimatron 21 21 29 33.7 0.011 414 Cincom Systems Inc. 112 139 137 -1.1 0.052 147 Cisco 1,130 1,456 1,762 21.0 0.671 17 Citrix 809 1,057 1,392 31.7 0.530 24 Clearswift Corp. 44 50 57 14.3 0.022 273 Cleo 8 9 10 10.5 0.004 665 Click Commerce Inc. 94 103 113 9.6 0.043 173 Clickability 1 2 4 94.7 0.001 889 ClickSoftware 18 24 29 23.4 0.011 407 CMstat 5 5 3 -53.5 0.001 936 CNC Software Inc. 7 8 8 3.9 0.003 717 COA Solutions 58 69 82 18.9 0.031 222 Coastal Technologies 3 3 4 9.0 0.001 894 CODA 60 65 76 17.5 0.029 235 CodeGear 77 71 44 -37.9 0.017 318 Cognology 1 2 2 13.9 0.001 948 Cognos 759 832 931 11.9 0.354 35 Coheris 22 28 34 20.1 0.013 377 CollabNet 22 19 21 9.2 0.008 477 CombineNet 2 4 6 50.0 0.002 795 CommercialWare Inc. 1 1 1 8.3 0.000 967 CommuniGate Systems 34 51 56 9.8 0.021 276 CommVault Systems Inc. 73 100 129 29.3 0.049 157 ComOps 1 1 1 30.0 0.000 965 Compiere 3 5 5 9.5 0.002 816 ComponentOne 10 10 11 6.8 0.004 637 Composite Software 8 12 13 9.2 0.005 603 Computational Engineering Intl. Inc. 4 4 4 0.0 0.002 876 Computer Corp. of America (CCA) 27 28 24 -13.0 0.009 447 Compuware 733 740 738 -0.3 0.281 42 Concur Technologies 87 124 174 39.4 0.066 128 Consona 105 112 121 7.7 0.046 16520 #213259 ©2008 IDC
  25. 25. T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M) 2006–2007 2007 Share 2005 2006 2007 Growth (%) (%) 2007 Rank Constellation Software Inc. 114 144 170 18.2 0.065 129 Convera 23 17 19 11.5 0.007 500 Convergys 171 187 176 -5.9 0.067 127 Coral8 – 1 3 500.0 0.001 912 Cordys – 5 6 20.4 0.002 792 Corel Corp. 279 294 251 -14.8 0.095 101 Coremetrics 16 29 16 -46.5 0.006 562 Cornerstone OnDemand 3 4 5 42.2 0.002 831 Corticon 6 9 11 22.2 0.004 636 Courion Corp. 16 17 19 9.6 0.007 510 Coverity 7 8 9 10.9 0.003 687 Criston Software 6 7 8 8.6 0.003 734 Critical Path 44 31 34 8.3 0.013 382 Crossgate 9 18 22 27.3 0.009 466 Crown Computing 6 7 7 8.9 0.003 748 CSB-System AG 17 17 19 12.1 0.007 501 Cybershift 22 25 16 -36.0 0.006 554 CyberSource 3 2 2 4.6 0.001 938 Cybozu Inc. 29 32 35 10.7 0.013 369 Danware Data A/S 15 16 19 15.0 0.007 509 Daptiv 6 14 15 10.5 0.006 567 Dassault Systemes 1,054 1,127 1,486 31.9 0.566 20 Data I/O 5 5 5 -6.8 0.002 838 DataCore Software 24 27 30 13.6 0.012 402 Datasul 56 72 95 31.9 0.036 200 DataSynapse Inc. 12 20 35 72.8 0.013 370 Datawatch Corp. 18 19 21 15.7 0.008 473 DATEV eG 289 294 323 10.1 0.123 79 Day Software 10 11 16 36.4 0.006 563 db4objects 2 4 8 100.0 0.003 723 Deltek Systems 109 159 190 19.5 0.072 117 DemandTec 15 30 40 33.3 0.015 348 Descartes Systems 46 49 50 1.9 0.019 294 Digital River Inc. 71 90 103 15.2 0.039 184 Diligent Technologies – 22 22 2.8 0.009 465 Diskeeper Corp. 32 28 24 -15.6 0.009 448 DO2 Technologies 7 7 7 4.9 0.003 745 Document Sciences Corp. 20 22 27 22.3 0.010 421 DoubleClick Inc. 46 46 51 10.0 0.019 293 Double-Take Software 42 58 71 24.1 0.027 243 DSC 21 22 25 15.1 0.010 433 Dun & Bradstreet (D&B Sls & Mktg. Sols) 31 43 47 8.5 0.018 307 Duzon Digitalware 16 17 20 14.0 0.007 493 Dynamacs 6 7 8 9.4 0.003 735 Easylink Services 79 74 74 0.0 0.028 240 Eclipsys 249 278 300 8.0 0.114 83 Econintel Treasury Systems Inc. 2 3 3 6.4 0.001 928©2008 IDC #213259 21
  26. 26. T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M) 2006–2007 2007 Share 2005 2006 2007 Growth (%) (%) 2007 Rank Ecora Software 11 9 10 11.8 0.004 655 Ecteon 8 9 10 10.5 0.004 666 EDB Gruppen A/S 21 22 23 1.8 0.009 462 Edifecs 6 7 8 10.5 0.003 733 eGain 16 14 14 -2.2 0.005 593 eIQ Networks Inc. 6 12 19 58.3 0.007 507 Ektron 8 13 19 44.5 0.007 503 Elcom International Inc. 3 3 3 5.0 0.001 929 Electronic Arts 403 544 533 -2.1 0.203 59 Element K 13 13 14 3.7 0.005 591 Emagia 6 6 7 6.8 0.003 762 Embarcadero Technologies 43 47 43 -8.7 0.016 325 EMC 3,491 3,637 3,938 8.3 1.499 7 Emergis 33 38 44 16.7 0.017 323 Empirix 67 73 69 -5.5 0.026 251 Empress Software 38 41 45 11.1 0.017 313 Emptoris 22 30 33 10.0 0.013 386 Endeca 27 54 83 54.8 0.032 219 ENEA 33 37 46 25.3 0.018 310 Engineous Software Inc. 5 5 8 50.8 0.003 741 Enigma 13 15 16 10.1 0.006 550 Enterasys Networks Inc. 56 65 76 17.3 0.029 233 Enterprise Incentive Software Inc. 6 7 8 7.1 0.003 743 Enterworks 13 15 10 -35.5 0.004 675 Entigo 7 7 8 9.5 0.003 726 Entomo 5 6 7 10.5 0.003 770 Entrust Inc. 84 81 77 -6.0 0.029 232 Epicor Software Corp. 212 250 270 8.1 0.103 91 ePlus 12 10 11 7.2 0.004 647 Eqos 3 3 4 10.5 0.001 891 ERI Bancaire SA 67 56 59 5.1 0.022 270 ESA Software Spa 28 29 32 11.8 0.012 389 Escalate Retail 48 50 41 -19.2 0.016 344 ESET 20 44 55 26.0 0.021 280 ESI 6 7 8 12.1 0.003 739 Esker Software 25 26 30 15.2 0.012 400 e-Spirit AG 3 6 5 -9.6 0.002 824 ESRI 465 516 570 10.5 0.217 55 ESS 9 10 8 -14.9 0.003 711 etrials 2 3 3 4.5 0.001 908 Eurosoft (UK) 4 4 4 7.2 0.002 859 EVault 27 34 35 3.4 0.013 374 EVER Group 9 10 13 26.4 0.005 607 Everest Software Inc. 8 8 8 6.9 0.003 716 Evolutionary Technologies International 13 14 16 10.2 0.006 558 EXA Corp. 3 3 3 0.0 0.001 903 Exact Holding NV 239 247 278 12.8 0.106 8822 #213259 ©2008 IDC
  27. 27. T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M) 2006–2007 2007 Share 2005 2006 2007 Growth (%) (%) 2007 Rank Excelergy Corp. 7 7 7 4.5 0.003 757 Exigen 7 9 8 -10.7 0.003 724 Expandable Software Inc. 5 5 6 6.8 0.002 805 Experian 26 30 23 -24.4 0.009 463 Explorer Software Inc. 2 4 4 4.6 0.002 868 Exstream 50 64 80 25.0 0.030 227 Extol 10 11 12 5.7 0.004 632 Eze Castle Software 3 5 7 50.0 0.003 764 FaceTime Communications Inc. 14 19 22 13.4 0.008 467 Fair Isaac 650 680 664 -2.3 0.253 49 FairCom Corp. 2 2 2 5.2 0.001 942 Falconstor Software Inc. 37 51 72 41.5 0.027 242 Fast Search & Transfer Inc. 92 111 107 -3.3 0.041 178 FatWire Software 22 23 25 6.8 0.010 437 Fenestrae BV 7 7 8 4.1 0.003 740 Fidelity National 164 228 243 6.6 0.092 102 Fidessa 70 96 130 35.4 0.049 156 Fieldglass 5 8 9 9.4 0.003 698 Financial Objects PLC 15 23 25 9.8 0.009 442 Financial Sciences Corp. 11 11 12 6.5 0.005 622 Financial Software Systems 4 4 4 4.5 0.002 866 Finestra 1 1 1 8.9 0.001 964 Fiorano Software Inc. 6 7 9 19.7 0.003 703 FirePond Inc. 7 7 2 -70.8 0.001 953 Firestar 4 5 5 9.4 0.002 826 First Data (Peace Software) 11 11 13 11.7 0.005 613 Firstwave Technologies Inc. 3 2 4 48.3 0.001 896 Fiserv 744 818 893 9.1 0.340 38 FlexiInternational Software 7 7 8 6.8 0.003 738 Formula Telecom Solutions 3 3 4 7.4 0.001 887 Foundation for Windows 7 8 9 6.4 0.003 702 Four Js Development Tools Inc. 13 15 16 5.2 0.006 552 Four Soft Ltd. 2 2 2 8.8 0.001 944 FrontRange Solutions Inc. 93 101 85 -15.4 0.032 216 FRS 8 10 11 7.7 0.004 645 F-Secure Corp. 77 102 132 29.2 0.050 151 Fujitsu 2,285 2,250 2,270 0.9 0.864 11 Gateway Systems Inc. 3 4 4 5.0 0.002 867 Gavel and Gown Software 8 9 9 5.3 0.004 679 Gemalto 41 42 62 47.1 0.024 262 Gemmar Systems International Inc. 1 2 2 3.9 0.001 961 Gemstone – 1 1 40.0 0.000 973 Genesys Conferencing 20 30 34 12.6 0.013 378 Genesys Software Systems Inc. 4 5 5 8.7 0.002 821 Genesys Telecommunications Laboratories 280 311 367 18.0 0.140 74 Gensym 9 10 9 -3.5 0.004 685 GFI Informatique 90 95 110 15.7 0.042 176©2008 IDC #213259 23
  28. 28. T ABLE 3 Worldwide Packaged Software Revenue by Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M) 2006–2007 2007 Share 2005 2006 2007 Growth (%) (%) 2007 Rank GHX 26 42 45 7.1 0.017 315 GigaSpaces 4 7 14 100.0 0.005 589 Global 360 74 102 119 17.2 0.045 168 Global IDs Inc. – – 1 NA 0.000 971 Global Software Inc. 33 36 44 22.2 0.017 321 GlobeNet Technologies 3 4 4 9.4 0.001 885 GMT Corp. 11 14 15 8.5 0.006 572 GoldenGate Inc. 33 45 52 17.3 0.020 290 Google Inc. 110 187 181 -2.9 0.069 123 Gores Technology Group 17 19 15 -17.6 0.006 570 Graphisoft 30 37 40 7.8 0.015 354 Green Hills Software 44 45 45 1.3 0.017 314 Gruppo Formula Spa 16 17 20 13.4 0.007 496 GSE Systems 3 4 5 15.6 0.002 844 GT Software – 4 4 8.4 0.002 862 Guidance 31 49 65 33.6 0.025 258 GXS 400 390 390 0.0 0.148 70 Haansoft Inc. 19 22 24 11.2 0.009 449 Haley 10 12 14 12.0 0.005 590 Halo Technology 9 11 12 8.2 0.005 629 Halogen Software 8 15 20 33.3 0.008 485 Handysoft Corp. 23 26 32 22.4 0.012 394 HansaWorld Ltd. 9 15 16 12.3 0.006 546 HardDollar 4 4 4 9.6 0.002 855 Hauri Inc. 11 13 8 -39.9 0.003 729 HDS 304 273 294 7.8 0.112 85 Healthvision 70 84 96 13.5 0.036 196 Healy Hudson 5 6 6 6.9 0.002 799 Heroix Corp. 5 7 7 4.9 0.003 750 High Line Corp. 6 7 7 6.0 0.003 746 Hit Software 3 2 3 12.0 0.001 922 Hitachi 1,357 1,349 1,429 6.0 0.544 23 HK Systems 20 21 24 11.4 0.009 451 HodesIQ 2 4 4 9.4 0.002 860 Hogia Group 26 29 33 13.5 0.012 387 HP 4,392 4,469 4,612 3.2 1.755 6 HR Access 29 33 35 5.2 0.013 375 HR Technologies 3 4 4 9.4 0.001 883 Hubwoo 32 35 39 10.9 0.015 357 Hyland Software 60 68 92 34.8 0.035 206 Hyphen 14 15 15 6.0 0.006 568 Hyphen Solutions 38 44 47 7.6 0.018 305 i2 Technologies 161 145 135 -6.5 0.051 148 IBM 18,720 20,035 21,824 8.9 8.306 2 IBM Application Solutions 57 60 65 8.0 0.025 257 IBS AB 70 69 73 4.8 0.028 241 ICG Commerce 12 14 15 10.3 0.006 57724 #213259 ©2008 IDC

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