Medical School: What Happens Here?

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Medical School: What Happens Here?

  1. 1. DNHS Future Doctors of America Club October 2013 Special Guest Speaker ~ Dr. John Dick Ophthalmology – Kaiser Permanente San Diego
  2. 2. Years One and Two
  3. 3.  Year one of medical school consists of mostly basic sciences courses. Medical school also consists of medical ethics courses, also known as OSCEs, in which you learn about patient examinations and more. OSCEs refer to Objective Structured Clinical Exams in which you are presented with various patient scenarios. In these scenarios, an actor portrays a patient with a certain clinical disease and you are expected to obtain a thorough medical history and physical examination in the allotted time period.  In year one, you will attend lectures and labs about Gross Anatomy (the study of structure of organs and tissues), Histology (the study of cells), Pathology (the study of diseases and their effect on the body) and Biochemistry (the branch of science concerned with the chemical and physicochemical processes that occur within living organisms).
  4. 4.  Year two of medical school is typically clinical-based. Here you will learn a handful of the diseases you will encounter in the hospital, such as:  Myocardial infarction (heart attack)  Pulmonary embolism (blood clot in the lungs)  Deep Vein Thrombosis (blood clot in the leg)  Rheumatoid Arthritis  Congestive heart failure  At the end of your second year in medical school, you will have to take Part 1 of the USMLE (United States Medical License Exam). The USMLE assesses a physician's ability to apply knowledge, concepts, and principles to ensure a basis of safe and effective patient care. This test is needed to move on into the third and fourth year of medical school.
  5. 5. Years One and Two •Consists of mostly basic science and clinical based courses with the addition of medical ethics courses. •You’ll attend lectures/labs about Gross Anatomy, Histology, Pathology, and Biochemistry. •At the end of your second year, you shall take the first part of the USMLE. Years Three and Four
  6. 6.  Year three consists of clinical rotations. Here you will become part of the medical team. A medical team typically consists of an attending (senior doctor), residents (doctors-in-training) and interns (first year residents).  You will rotate through the many clinical specialties of medicine, such as Internal Medicine (adult medicine), pediatrics, obstetrics/gynecology, psychiatry, surgery, etc. Here, you will get a taste of what kind of doctor you will become.  Your team will grade you on your performance during your rotation. As with any work environment, this can be a bit biased. However, national tests are administered at the end of your rotations. Some medical schools require you to pass this exam to receive a grade at the end of your clinical rotations.
  7. 7.  Year four of medical school is much like year three but a bit more specialized. You can delve into the specialties of medicine even more. For example, if you liked internal medicine, you can elect to do a gastroenterology, cardiology or rheumatology rotation.  Elective rotations in subspecialties like Oncology, orthopedics, dermatology, neurosurgery, etc. Elective time for research, public health project, experience abroad, study at other med schools.  At the end of your fourth year in medical school, you will take the second part of the USMLE. The second part of this exam is centered around clinical skills.
  8. 8. Years One and Two •Consists of mostly basic science and clinical based courses with the addition of medical ethics courses. •You’ll attend lectures/labs about Gross Anatomy, Histology, Pathology, and Biochemistry. •At the end of your second year, you shall take the first part of the USMLE. Years Three and Four •Consists of clinical rotations with medical teams, includes rotations in Internal Medicine, Surgery, Obstetrics/Gynecology, Psychiatry, etc. •Elective rotations in subspecialties. •Elective time for research, public health projects, etc. •Take part two of the USMLE.
  9. 9.  After you have finished your four years of medical school, you are now a doctor, but now you will undergo training to work as a specialist. Surgery, Pediatrics, Radiology, Oncology, and Ophthalmology are all examples of specialties.  Following completion of medical school, you must first complete a one year long internship in general medicine. After one year, you will take the third part of the USMLE for an official medical license.  Now, we can begin our training to become a specialist! Depending on which specialty you would like to pursue, it will take on average 2-5+ years to complete your residency (a period of time where you work in a hospital alongside a doctor to learn more hands on skills about your specialty; at this stage, you are a “Doctor-in-training”) in the specialty area.
  10. 10.  After you finish your residency, you can finally begin to work as a specialist (Radiologist, Surgeon, Oncologist, etc.)!  Yet, many doctors want to not only pursue a specific specialty, but they want to pursue a specialty within their specialty, which is known as a subspecialty. For example, we know that Surgery (a Surgeon) is a type of specialty that you can pursue. Now, Plastic Surgery (a Plastic Surgeon) is a specific topic within the general specialty of Surgery. Doctors who pursue a sub-specialty first must complete a residency in the general topic (in this case, Surgery), and then they will complete a fellowship in their desired sub-specialty. To train to pursue a sub-specialty, you must complete a fellowship. Depending on your desired sub-specialty, it will usually take around 2-4 years to complete the fellowship.
  11. 11.  Length of Specialty training: • 3+ years = Pediatrics, Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Emergency Medicine, General Practice Medicine. • 4-5+ years = Psychiatry, General Surgery, Orthopedic Surgery, Dermatology, Radiology. • 6-7+ yrs.= Neurosurgery, Cardiac Surgery
  12. 12. Dr. John Dick Ophthalmology Kaiser Permanente San Diego

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