Health and sustainable development: implications for local and global health

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An analysis of the inequities in health and sustainable development in the Panama Canal watershed.

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Health and sustainable development: implications for local and global health

  1. 1. Arletty Pinel, MDInternational Center for Sustainable Development - CIDES apinel@cdspanama.org http://twitter/ArlettyVox
  2. 2. General considerations
  3. 3. Factors affecting health in 21st Century Poverty, health inequalities and growing disparities of outcome Poor distribution of health workforce and brain drain Ageing and the growth of cities Infectious diseases, and increasing noncommunicable diseases, injuries and violence Global environmental threats to human survival New technologies: information, eHealth, biotechnology Partnerships between the private and public sectors and civil society Increasing number of trainees in affluent nations seeking to benefit world’s destitute Globalization of trade, travel and spread of values and
  4. 4. Health in Sustainable DevelopmentPlanning Environmental factors are a major contributor to health, illness and death Age-old public hazards occur with new environment and development problems Problems are often simultaneously local and global Urban growth has exposed populations to serious environmental hazards while straining capacity of health system Fundamental factors include inadequate attention to health in development policy and practice, lack of coordinated management and insufficient inter-sectoral collaboration
  5. 5. The Panama Canal watershed
  6. 6. Panama in the World (2000) Income per capita vs. Life Expectancy at Birth World Nation Panamanian District L.E. – Panama country avg.: 74.4 yearsSources:World GDP per capita 2000: Development Data Group, The World Bank. 2008. 2008 World Development Indicators Online. Washington, DC: The World Bank; World Life Expectancy at Birth 2000-2005 : PopulationDivision of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat, 2007. World Population Prospects: The 2006 Revision. New York: United Nations.Panama Real Income per capita & Life Expectancy at Birth 2000: Dirección de Estadística y Censo de la Contraloría General de la República, con el Apoyo de Naciones Unidas (UNDP). 2004. Sistema Integrado deIndicadores para el Desarrollo – República de Panamá (http://www.contraloria.gob.pa/dec/sid/)
  7. 7. Panama in the World (2000) Income per capita vs. Life Expectancy at Birth World Nation Panamanian District 55.5 years L.E. – Panama country range 75.3Sources: yearsWorld GDP per capita 2000: Development Data Group, The World Bank. 2008. 2008 World Development Indicators Online. Washington, DC: The World Bank; World Life Expectancy at Birth 2000-2005 : PopulationDivision of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations Secretariat, 2007. World Population Prospects: The 2006 Revision. New York: United Nations.Panama Real Income per capita & Life Expectancy at Birth 2000: Dirección de Estadística y Censo de la Contraloría General de la República, con el Apoyo de Naciones Unidas (UNDP). 2004. Sistema Integrado deIndicadores para el Desarrollo – República de Panamá (http://www.contraloria.gob.pa/dec/sid/)
  8. 8. Political division
  9. 9. Population distribution
  10. 10. Poverty levels
  11. 11. Human development index
  12. 12. Aqueducts
  13. 13. Educational centers
  14. 14. Health services network
  15. 15. Conclusion
  16. 16. Global health Is the health of populations in a global context Transcends perspectives and concerns of individual countries Global political and economic impact often emphasized It is about worldwide improvement of health, reduction of disparities, and protection against global threats that disregard national borders Global platforms tend to address global health in approaches aimed at poverty; equity is not fully understood, operationalized or prioritized
  17. 17. Potential areas of collaboration Health information gathering beyond epidemiological surveillance Health innovation and research to support long-term goals of the Panama Canal Authority Health planning within a sustainable development framework Human capacity development Knowledge and information society Cross border cooperation
  18. 18.  Healthy life is an outcome of sustainable development, as well as a powerful and undervalued means of achieving it. We need to see health both as a precious asset in itself, and as a means of stimulating economic growth and reducing poverty. - Dr Gro Harlem Brundtland Director-General Emeritus, WHO.
  19. 19. Thank you - Gracias

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