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Some american states have no capacity to handle same sex divorce by arlene kock

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San Francisco-based family law attorney Arlene Kock provides legal services to clients in the Bay Area. In addition to specializing in child-custody mediation and divorce law, Arlene Kock represents numerous same-sex couples.

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Some american states have no capacity to handle same sex divorce by arlene kock

  1. 1. By Arlene Kock
  2. 2. San Francisco-based family law attorney Arlene Kock provides legal services to clients in the Bay Area. In addition to specializing in child-custody mediation and divorce law, Arlene Kock represents numerous same-sex couples.
  3. 3. With New Jersey recently added, Same-sex marriage is now recognized in fourteen American states, and couples nationwide have taken advantage of new legislation by traveling to gay-friendly jurisdictions to exchange their vows. But for those unions that may not survive, complications exist that could prevent couples from divorcing or making important decisions about such matters as division of property.
  4. 4. Should a same-sex married couple have their domicile registered in Texas, Florida, or Ohio, for example, it is not possible to divorce through the state courts. This is because these state courts do not recognize the samesex marriage as legally binding. Some states, such as California, have relaxed residency requirements to accommodate marriage dissolution for same-sex couples unable to dissolve a partnership in their home state, as long as the marriage took place in California. However, if the partners are not residents of California, the court may still be restricted from making decisions about debt, property, or child support. Additionally, should a divorce decree be issued, it may not be enforced in the home state’s jurisdiction.

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