Leendert de Die and Jan van Minnen "TRM"

691 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
691
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
232
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Leendert de Die and Jan van Minnen "TRM"

  1. 1. Communities and Institutions for Flood Resilience Turning Tides? Tidal River ManagementOn sinking sediments and sentiments Jan van Minnen Leendert de Die September – December 2012
  2. 2. Outline• What is Tidal River Management (TRM)?• The research area• Jan: historical and physical introduction• Leendert: perspectives of TRM• Conclusion
  3. 3. Jan – research objective• To understand TRM from a historical physical perspective.
  4. 4. Methodology
  5. 5. A dynamic history
  6. 6. CEP 1960
  7. 7. Research AreaJessore Khulna
  8. 8. Research design
  9. 9. Dynamics velocities and water levels 2 8.5 8 1.5 7.5 1velocity counts/ meters 7 Tidal Basin 0.5 River Upstream 6.5 water level 0 0.4 0.45 0.5 0.55 0.6 0.65 0.7 0.75 0.8 6 -0.5 5.5 -1 5 time
  10. 10. Preliminary findings• Tidal Basins are crucial for the Hari river• Only siltation is possible, no redirection• Increased siltation due to reclamation on new floodplains• What is Tidal River Management? – Water management? – Sediment management? – Flow velocity management? – Tidal volume management?
  11. 11. Leendert – research objectives• To map current water management practices in Hari-Mukteswari river.• To find how different stakeholders perceive “TRM”• To find current problems regarding water management in Hari-Mukteswari river.
  12. 12. Design: river focus
  13. 13. Methods 1: Interviews in the field
  14. 14. Methods 2: Participatory map drawing
  15. 15. Methods 3– “Detective style”– Data triangulation
  16. 16. Preliminary resultsWater is controlled by elite – not by WMG / WMA
  17. 17. WMGs & WMAs are in identity crisis
  18. 18. 99% of people want TRM& regard it essential to their livelihood
  19. 19. Communities and Institutions for Flood Resilience Turning Tides?
  20. 20. What happened?• BWDB & MPs at Kapalia to open tidal basin• Demonstrators prevented the opening• 12 cars burned• BWDB and govt. officials fled for their lives
  21. 21. Why?• Peripheral embankments construction• Compensation: – Bureaucratic procedure – Land inheritance – Enemy land• Beel Khuksia experience: – Initial plan: 3-4 years – Now: 6 years• Low trust in government
  22. 22. Common conclusions• Tidal basins are crucial for the Hari river• “Scaling” is essential in understanding “TRM”: – Focus on entire river and delta, not tidal basin• Challenges pertaining to TRM are political rather than physical

×