Learning 2.0Personal and professional growth through communities ofpractice and Social learningOctober 7, 2009Proprietary ...
Welcome                                                                  • Welcome & Introduction of Hosts                ...
Agenda                                    • Describe Web 2.0 with examples                                    • Suggest so...
What is Web 2.0?             • What was once a library is now a café.             • Web technology that has facilitated ea...
Wikis (E.g. Wikipedia)Proprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, l...
Wiki Revision HistoryProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, le...
Micro-blogging           • Updates in 140 characters           • Similar to having a conversation vs.             leaving ...
Learning with Twitter              • Find people and follow them                           o      Friends                 ...
Really Simple SyndicationProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as...
RSS Reader exampleProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal...
Weblogs         • Time-stamped ‘diaries’ posted           in reverse chronological order            o Technorati tracks 70...
Social Bookmarking   • Store, organize, share,     search, and manage     bookmarks of web     pages      o See a website’...
Podcasting               • Interview experts               • Share presentations               • Broadcast information    ...
Social networking   • A social structure tied by one     or more specific types of     interdependency       o Facebook   ...
What is a Personal Learning Environment?      • A personal learning environment (PLE) or network (PLN) helps you as a     ...
My PLE© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
Sample PLE (Bamboo project blog)© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
PLE Mapping      • Pair up into groups of 2-3      • Take turns describing your PLE to your team members while one of them...
What is a Community of Practice?Workers spend a third of their time looking for information and are five times more likely...
CoP Benefits    Benefits include the following:      •      Problem solving      •      Developing new capabilities      •...
Perot’s Human Performance CoP© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
CoP Model© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
Steps to creating a CoP      •        Step 1: Establish/identify a purpose      •        Step 2: Identify a community     ...
What makes a successful CoP?      •        Clear purpose – what will it be used to do?      •        Creating a safe and t...
AppendixProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or profes...
Web 2.0:                                                                                                                  ...
Web 2.0 – Overview    While the tech sector reeled from the burst of the dot-com bubble in 2000, a strong current of innov...
Web 2.0 – Software    Enterprise Web 2.0 Software    The term Web 2.0 has come to embody both consumer and business use of...
Web 2.0 – Examples                                                         Jeep                                           ...
Web 2.0 – Technologies                                                                      Source: Forrester© 2008 Perot ...
Web 2.0 – Market     The Global Enterprise Web 2.0 Market will reach $4.6 billion in 2013.               Social networking...
Web 2.0 – Trends and Predictions                                                                                Source: Fo...
Web 2.0 – Trends and Predictions (contd.)          •      IT departments will take their heads out of the sand and embrace...
Web 2.0 – Trends and Predictions (contd.)          •      Major acquisitions and market exits will experience a drought. I...
Web 2.0 – Trends and Predictions (contd.)          •      Microsoft’s SharePoint will continue to steamroll the market. Wh...
Appendix I – Knowledge Management Hype Cycle, 2002                                                                        ...
References© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Oe Workshop Learning 2 0 Presentation

613 views

Published on

Personal and professional growth through communities of practice and social learning

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
613
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • For the first ten years or so the Internet was like a library where the books are web sites. You could mostly just write and read books or, in other words, view and create websites. In the last 5-6 years, however, the internet has become more like a café where you can not only write and read books but you can write in other people’s books, improve them and rate them while having a conversation about them with other people in the café. 80% of learning is informal and takes places on the job. Web 2.0 can help facilitate that learning. [Read second bullet] As an example, I borrowed most of the Web 2.0 definition in italics from Wikipedia. [NEXT SLIDE]
  • [link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_2.0 ] Most of you have probably heard of wikipedia: it’s a collaborative online encyclopedia where anyone can create or modify articles, and one example of Web 2-0. I created an entry back in 2005 on Yoseikan Budo – the martial art I practice. Since then, dozens of people have edited the article to make it more complete and accurate. Wikis are an excellent way to collaborate on content in the form of one or more web pages that multiple people are working on. [NEXT SLIDE]
  • Wikis use change control to allow you to see the changes made to a page. Q: Here’s a question for those of you in the chat room - How do or have we use wikis within Perot or at a client site? [NEXT SLIDE]
  • http://blog.searchenginewatch.com/090408-122803 – twitter stats http://twistori.com/#i_believe – twitter story http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/06/12/dell-has-earned-3-million-from-twitter/ - Dell uses twitter - http://www.dell.com/twitter I think most people don’t ‘get’ micro-blogging at first. I know I didn’t, and I still don’t post updates often. But corporations, including our customers, are using twitter to deliver better customer service. A June blog in the New York Times reported that Dell has made $3 million in sales via twitter. They use twitter to send coupons, post updates on new products, and provide useful information to the twitter community.
  • Dell has dozens of twitter accounts but one I thought was interesting is Digital Nomads, which posts updates for individuals that travel with their laptop. Notice on this screenshot that I took from twitter on the bottom right there’s a button that says RSS feed. This stands for Really Simple Syndication, which are Web feed formats used to publish frequently updated works—such as blog entries, news headlines, audio, and video—in a standardized format. It’s an easy way to keep track of content from multiple sources in one place.
  • There are multiple RSS readers available from yahoo or Google for example. This is a screenshot of my Google reader. Whenever I subscribe to an RSS feed, it will show up under my subscriptions. By clicking a blog on the bottom left I can see snippets of the latest posts and read whatever catches my interest. You can also subscribe to specific RSS feeds via Outlook by clicking the RSS Feeds mailbox folder. That content will then be delivered to your inbox. Poll 3: Let’s move on to our next polling question: Do you have a profile on LinkedIn, Facebook, or other Social Networking site? [NEXT SLIDE AFTER POLL]
  • Open state of the nation blog stats: http://www.sifry.com/alerts/archives/000493.html There’s a blog for just about everything. According to the best selling author Seth Godin, who’s written a guide to blogs and the new Web, there are three kinds of blogs: one is a cat blog which is basically a (mostly public) personal diary. I have a blog that I update with just my work activities so I have a record of what I worked on and don’t forget specifics of a project that happened in the past, but it’s private so only I can view it. The second is a boss blog, which are used to communicate to a defined set of people. Two examples are John King’s blog, which updates Perot employees on his activities, and my mom started a blog to update her family and close friends when she was going through cancer recently. The third type of blog is a Viral blog the purpose of which is to spread the ideas of the writer. There may be a number of reasons to do this: to get consulting work, build thought leadership, or to find new customers for example. (There’s a link to his ebook, Who’s There? – a guide to blogs and the new Web – in the appendix).
  • http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/files/whos_there.pdf http://www.tagoras.com/docs/Learning_20_for_Associations_v1.pdf http://www.mashable.com
  • Go2web20.net keeps tabs on new Web 2.0 sites
  • Oe Workshop Learning 2 0 Presentation

    1. 1. Learning 2.0Personal and professional growth through communities ofpractice and Social learningOctober 7, 2009Proprietary and confidential. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved. All registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. FOR INTERNAL USE ONLY.
    2. 2. Welcome • Welcome & Introduction of Hosts o Arend Schuring (Human Performance Consultant, Perot Systems/Dell) o Ravel Thai • Tweetchat / Twitter Hastag #OECOP o Ask questions o Comment o Interact with others inside and outside (during and after) the workshopProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or professional advice. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved.
    3. 3. Agenda • Describe Web 2.0 with examples • Suggest some ways you can create a personal learning network to keep up with what’s important to you • Show how you can either create or enhance a CoP with Web 2.0 applications.Proprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or professional advice. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved.
    4. 4. What is Web 2.0? • What was once a library is now a café. • Web technology that has facilitated easy communication, information sharing, user-centered design and collaboration. This includes, (but is not limited to): o Weblogs o Wiki o Social bookmarking & tagging o Social Networking Communities o Instant Messaging/Presence o RSS Feed Readers o Micro-blogging o Podcasts, videocastsProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or professional advice. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved.
    5. 5. Wikis (E.g. Wikipedia)Proprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or professional advice. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved.
    6. 6. Wiki Revision HistoryProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or professional advice. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved.
    7. 7. Micro-blogging • Updates in 140 characters • Similar to having a conversation vs. leaving comments on blogs o Share content o Get answers to questions o Instant gratification • Twitter has grown more in number of users than other social networks • 45-54 year olds are top demographic • International use is on the riseProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or professional advice. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved.
    8. 8. Learning with Twitter • Find people and follow them o Friends o Colleagues • Listen o Ten minutes a day • Contribute o Reply o Ask questionsProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or professional advice. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved.
    9. 9. Really Simple SyndicationProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or professional advice. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved.
    10. 10. RSS Reader exampleProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or professional advice. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved.
    11. 11. Weblogs • Time-stamped ‘diaries’ posted in reverse chronological order o Technorati tracks 70 million o 120,000 created daily o Over 90% of blogs are abandoned • Types of blogs (via Seth Godin) o Cat – personal diary o Boss – to a defined set of people o Viral – spreading ideas • Encourage participation through commentsProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or professional advice. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved.
    12. 12. Social Bookmarking • Store, organize, share, search, and manage bookmarks of web pages o See a website’s popularity o Learn other sites similar to the ones you bookmarkProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or professional advice. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved.
    13. 13. Podcasting • Interview experts • Share presentations • Broadcast information • Connect at a more personal level • InspireProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or professional advice. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved.
    14. 14. Social networking • A social structure tied by one or more specific types of interdependency o Facebook o LinkedIn • Share photos, blog, comment, chat, post status updates (i.e. what are you doing?) • Pligg / Ning – create your own social network • Ambient awareness o Strengthens relationships o Creates weak ties to those we don’t yet knowProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or professional advice. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved.
    15. 15. What is a Personal Learning Environment? • A personal learning environment (PLE) or network (PLN) helps you as a learner manage your learning by: o Setting goals o Managing content o Communicating with others in the process© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    16. 16. My PLE© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    17. 17. Sample PLE (Bamboo project blog)© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    18. 18. PLE Mapping • Pair up into groups of 2-3 • Take turns describing your PLE to your team members while one of them maps it out • Include one or two new Web 2.0 technologies that you find interesting o Include how you would use them© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    19. 19. What is a Community of Practice?Workers spend a third of their time looking for information and are five times more likely to turn to a coworker rather than an explicit source of information A community is a blend of: • A virtual collaboration of personnel (inside and outside the enterprise) that seek to share and advance the state of knowledge about a subject, process, or technology • A body of knowledge, tools, processes, or techniques that are maintained to enhance an organization’s ability to deliver services and business value • An industry-based, cooperative, or government organization that seeks to disseminate critical knowledge to its constituents© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    20. 20. CoP Benefits Benefits include the following: • Problem solving • Developing new capabilities • Leveraging best practices • Standardizing practices • Time savings • Increase in talent • Avoiding mistakes • Creating new knowledge© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    21. 21. Perot’s Human Performance CoP© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    22. 22. CoP Model© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    23. 23. Steps to creating a CoP • Step 1: Establish/identify a purpose • Step 2: Identify a community • Step 3: Understand the culture and behaviors • Step 4: Develop/support the community • Step 5: Monitor and measure everything! Via SlideShare:- Communities of Practice:turning conversations into collaboration© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    24. 24. What makes a successful CoP? • Clear purpose – what will it be used to do? • Creating a safe and trusted environment • Committed core group of active participants • Being motivated • Knowing the needs of participants • Having a clear action plan with activities to meet needs • Blending face-to-face and online activities Via SlideShare:- Communities of Practice:turning conversations into collaboration© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    25. 25. AppendixProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or professional advice. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved.
    26. 26. Web 2.0: Overview http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/files/whos_there.pdf http://www.tagoras.com/docs/Learning_20_for_Associations_v1.pdfProprietary and confidential. This information does not represent, and should not be construed as, legal or professional advice. © 2008 Perot Systems. All Rights Reserved.
    27. 27. Web 2.0 – Overview While the tech sector reeled from the burst of the dot-com bubble in 2000, a strong current of innovation — enabled by unprecedented consumer broadband adoption, cheap fiber lines built during the last boom, and increasingly efficient hosting centers — was growing. In 2004, O’Reilly Media gave a name to the phenomenon of using the Web to efficiently connect people, content, and data, dubbing it “Web 2.0.”1 Forrester defines Web 2.0 as: A set of technologies and applications that enable efficient interaction among people, content, and data in support of collectively fostering new businesses, technology offerings, and social structures. In Forrester’s view, the key hallmark of Web 2.0 is efficiency for end users, and the ultimate goal is to use technology like Ajax, rich Internet applications, blogs, wikis, and social networks to foster productive, advantageous behavior among employees, customers, partners, and other networks such as Social Computing, the Information Workplace, and collective intelligence Source: Forrester© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    28. 28. Web 2.0 – Software Enterprise Web 2.0 Software The term Web 2.0 has come to embody both consumer and business use of next-generation Web technology; however, this lumping together of services is too imprecise to be practical. As a result, most pundits and technology strategists segment the market between consumer Web 2.0 services and business Web 2.0 services. Forrester, refers to the business Web 2.0 market as enterprise Web 2.0, which encompasses Web 2.0 technology and service investments for both externally facing marketing functions and internally facing productivity and collaboration functions. Web 2.0 consist of: • Purely consumer services are out. Consumer services like Blogger, Facebook, Netvibes, and Twitter are aimed squarely at consumers, and they typically offer free services supported by advertising. Because corporations do not pay for access to these sites, Forrester does not consider them as enterprise Web 2.0 sites. • Advertising expenditures on consumer services are out. While companies do pay to advertise on consumer Web 2.0 sites, those advertisers are not paying for technology access. Instead, marketers are paying to reach consumers, and these Web 2.0 sites serve as a media channel. • Enterprise marketing tools are in. Some marketers ultimately decide to build their own Web Words blog. Money spent to create and syndicate widgets, even on sites like Facebook or LinkedIn, would also be considered an enterprise Web 2.0 investment. 2.0 applications and communities — such as Intel’s vPro Expert Center and Kodak’s A Thousand • Web 2.0 collaboration and productivity tools are in. Finally, Web 2.0 tools and technologies are beginning to find a home within the enterprise for worker productivity and collaboration.7 Offerings like those from BEA Systems, IBM, and Microsoft and from pure-play vendors like Awareness, NewsGator Technologies, and Six Apart all factor into the enterprise Web 2.0 market. Source: Forrester© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    29. 29. Web 2.0 – Examples Jeep Flickr Kodak ShoreBank Source: Forrester© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    30. 30. Web 2.0 – Technologies Source: Forrester© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    31. 31. Web 2.0 – Market The Global Enterprise Web 2.0 Market will reach $4.6 billion in 2013. Social networking will remain the top spending category. Firms spend more for internal use today, but external use spending will grow faster. Europe and Asia Pacific will become substantial markets in 2009. Source: Forrester© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    32. 32. Web 2.0 – Trends and Predictions Source: Forrester© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    33. 33. Web 2.0 – Trends and Predictions (contd.) • IT departments will take their heads out of the sand and embrace Web 2.0 technologies. To date, most IT departments have resisted Web 2.0 tools, often viewing them as consumer grade — of secondary concern to other major IT investments — or simply frivolous. But in 2008, Forrester expects at least half of the 42% of enterprises that say Web 2.0 is not on their priority list to add it by year’s end. Why? First, the IT shops that began experimenting with enterprise Web 2.0 tools for their own use in 2007 — for tasks like help desk ticket resolution, standards and documentation tracking, and IT project management — will begin rolling out these tools more broadly to lines of business as they pass IT muster. Second, CIOs will concede that they cannot quell passionate employees’ use of consumer-oriented or SaaS Web 2.0 tools and will mitigate risk by deploying enterprise-class tools in their stead. Finally, for IT departments aspiring to be more relevant to the business, enterprise Web 2.0 tools will be a high-impact, low-cost method to show leadership and innovation. Tech strategists should focus feature development on IT in 2008 and keep a sharp eye on integration and deployment. For many vendors, this means offering the previously unthinkable: on-premise software. • Trial deployments in 2007 will deepen in 2008. Forrester has seen the adoption of enterprise Web 2.0 tools consistently follow a tried-and-true pattern: technology investigation, experimentation, rollout to small groups or teams, and finally widespread adoption. The vast majority of deployments followed this pattern in 2007, but as of yet very few have hit the point of pan-enterprise adoption. While every deployment is not expected to balloon to its full potential in 2008, its expected that enough will grow to provide solid revenue growth within existing installed bases. • Mashups will mature and eat into other major markets. Of all the enterprise Web 2.0 product categories, the mashup market saw the most innovation in 2007; IBM, Microsoft, and Serena Software all made major forays into the market. Forrester expects such innovation to bear fruit in 2008 as the market coalesces around a more cohesive set of business processes, value propositions, and usage metaphors. Enterprise mashups will move from a few one-off pilots to true enterprise-class software in the coming 12 months. That said, there will be no shortage of volatility on the supply side as mashups begin to take large bites out of the RSS, portal, search, and enterprise application integration (EAI) markets. So who wins those dollars? The vendors that can exert the most influence on standards boards and industry groups will push advantageous standards — such as the OAuth mashup authentication standard — and the vendors that can best articulate mashup value to the public will set market expectations. Source: Forrester© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    34. 34. Web 2.0 – Trends and Predictions (contd.) • Major acquisitions and market exits will experience a drought. In the long run — three years out — the enterprise Web 2.0 market will not have the carrying capacity to keep all of today’s active vendors thriving, but very few will cash out in 2008. Expect major acquirers — namely IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, and SAP — to keep growth as organic as they have to date. Overall, Forrester does not expect any major acquisitions. Tech strategists should look to larger vendors as partners and distributors rather than exit strategies. That said, there are several major wildcards that could knock this market off its tenuous equilibrium. Google and Salesforce.com could easily spark a run for Web 2.0 SaaS vendors with one or two smaller acquisitions, and a major acquisition of a leading startup vendor — such as Microsoft buying NewsGator — has the potential to result in the kind of vendor rollup that the BI market saw in 2007. • More midtier vendors will enter the space, capturing spend. Vendors will to continue to pour into the enterprise Web 2.0 space in 2008. But unlike the first wave, very few entrants will be small or startup vendors. Instead larger, established vendors in adjacent markets will offer Web 2.0 features and functionality en masse — just as Web content management vendor FatWire Software has done with its TeamUp product. Others will pivot outright to capture enterprise Web 2.0 dollars — as software configuration tools management vendor Serena Software has done with its business mashup product. Mashups in particular will draw in vendors from the search, portal, and EAI markets. In general, 2008 will see the entry of many midlevel software firms with niche offerings and specialized services fragmenting the market and intensifying competition. The real winners here will be those firms entering the enterprise Web 2.0 market — they can augment current offerings with simple Web 2.0 features — while existing Web 2.0 vendors, particularly pure-play vendors, will lose as they are forced to compete with a larger pool of competitors and in niche markets. • Consultants and systems integrators will conduct a strong build out of capabilities. Forrester expects a growing group of consultants and systems integrators to follow behind the leading edge of the enterprise Web 2.0 market. In 2008, look for services vendors to come to market with strong offerings for companies adopting enterprise Web 2.0 tools and processes. Unlike many business technology markets, Forrester expects far greater demand for process engineering and change management services than for systems integration because many of the early adopters have reported much more difficultly with cultural change and adoption than with technology integration and optimization. Look for services vendors like Accenture, Capgemini, Deloitte Development, and IBM Global Services to capture much of this nascent services market. Source: Forrester© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    35. 35. Web 2.0 – Trends and Predictions (contd.) • Microsoft’s SharePoint will continue to steamroll the market. While many will argue about the quality of SharePoint’s wiki, blog, and social networking functionality, the number of IT shops that look to Microsoft for Enterprise 2.0 technology speaks for itself. For SharePoint, 2008 will be another banner year. Forrester expects that the IT departments taking a leadership role in enterprise 2.0 deployments will look at SharePoint first.11 Furthermore, the sheer volume of employees already using SharePoint makes partnership one of the more attractive moves for the smaller, best-of-breed Web 2.0 vendors, thus improving the quality of SharePoint and driving even greater usage. While the rest of the market — analysts included — will continue to gripe about SharePoint in 2008, Microsoft is clearly in an enviable position and can afford to wait for the market to come to it. Source: Forrester© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    36. 36. Appendix I – Knowledge Management Hype Cycle, 2002 Source: Gartner© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.
    37. 37. References© 2008 Perot Systems Corporation. All rights reserved.

    ×