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Common advertising Techniques What the ad makers don’t want you to know…
Name Calling <ul><li>Used to create fear and arouse prejudice by using negative words (bad names) to create an unfavorable...
Glittering generalities <ul><li>Vague and sweeping statements (often  slogans  or simple  catchphrases ) using language as...
Transfer <ul><li>Transfer is a technique used    to carry over the authority    and approval of something we  respect/reve...
Testimonial <ul><li>Associating a respected person or someone with experience to endorse a product or cause by giving it t...
Plain Folks <ul><li>Finding an “average Joe” to use ordinary language and mannerisms to reach the audience and identify wi...
Bandwagon <ul><li>Used to persuade the audience to follow the crowd. This device creates the impression of “everyone is do...
Card stacking <ul><li>Makes the best case possible for one side and the worst for the opposing viewpoint by carefully usin...
Snob appeal <ul><li>Advertisers use images, music, etc that suggests that you can gain  status  or be like  wealthy  peopl...
Emotional Appeal <ul><li>Calls upon the consumer to make decisions based on a  feeling  rather than facts.  Ads that try t...
Scientific/Statistical <ul><li>Try to convince you to by providing  data  or  statistics  that back the product or idea.  ...
Now It’s your turn <ul><li>You will be given a magazine ad </li></ul><ul><li>Analyze the ad and determine which advertisin...
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Propaganda Techniques

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Propaganda Techniques

  1. 1. Common advertising Techniques What the ad makers don’t want you to know…
  2. 2. Name Calling <ul><li>Used to create fear and arouse prejudice by using negative words (bad names) to create an unfavorable opinion of a competing product, group, or idea. Name Calling is used in place of arguing the good points of an idea, belief, or proposal. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Glittering generalities <ul><li>Vague and sweeping statements (often slogans or simple catchphrases ) using language associated with values, beliefs, and desires deeply held by the audience. These statements do not provide any support or reason, they just imply the product/idea is favorable. It cannot be proved true or false because it really says little or nothing at all. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Transfer <ul><li>Transfer is a technique used to carry over the authority and approval of something we respect/revere to something the advertisers would have us believe. Often this technique employ symbols (e.g., waving the flag) to stir our emotions and win our approval – but the symbol may have nothing to do with the product or idea represented. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Testimonial <ul><li>Associating a respected person or someone with experience to endorse a product or cause by giving it their “stamp of approval” hoping that the audience will follow their example. Often this is in the form of a celebrity endorsement . </li></ul>
  6. 6. Plain Folks <ul><li>Finding an “average Joe” to use ordinary language and mannerisms to reach the audience and identify with their point of view. This approach is used to convince the audience that the spokesperson is from humble origins, someone they can trust and who has their interests at heart. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Bandwagon <ul><li>Used to persuade the audience to follow the crowd. This device creates the impression of “everyone is doing it” or “everyone has this product.” It reinforces the human desire to be on the winning side or to be part of the “in-crowd.” It also plays on feelings of loneliness and isolation - if they don't join in they will be left out. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Card stacking <ul><li>Makes the best case possible for one side and the worst for the opposing viewpoint by carefully using only those facts that support his or her side of the argument. In other words, the advertiser “stacks the cards” against the truth. Card stacking is the most difficult technique to detect because it does not provide all of the information necessary for the audience to make an informed decision. The audience must decide what is missing. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Snob appeal <ul><li>Advertisers use images, music, etc that suggests that you can gain status or be like wealthy people if you support the product or idea. “Exclusive” items or very expensive items. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Emotional Appeal <ul><li>Calls upon the consumer to make decisions based on a feeling rather than facts. Ads that try to make you feel joy, sadness, empathy, etc. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Scientific/Statistical <ul><li>Try to convince you to by providing data or statistics that back the product or idea. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Now It’s your turn <ul><li>You will be given a magazine ad </li></ul><ul><li>Analyze the ad and determine which advertising technique(s) are being used </li></ul><ul><li>Be prepared to share your thoughts with a partner </li></ul>

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