A Brief Introduction to Encoded Archival Description

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A basic presentation prepared for Queens College (CUNY) Graduate School of Library and Information Science, May 2011. Describes what EAD is, how it is created, and how it is implemented.

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  • Recent grad, now a processing archivist. New archivists point of view. Thank colleague and fellow alum Ryan Mendenhall, with whom I developed this presentation. EAD is not scary!
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/carowallis1/2314716161/sizes/m/in/photostream/ Will be available on slideshare – many links on images and in text in the later portion of the presentation
  • Familiar with html? Similar (tags aka mark-up), but data structure, not display
  • Common that programs will display tags in different color, to help differentiate markup from content
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnkay/3539126525/sizes/m/in/photostream/ Note that it is hierarchical – nested. Parent elements apply to child elements.
  • Encoding standards are rules for defining buckets; content standards are rules for the information inside http://www.flickr.com/photos/linneberg/4481309196/sizes/m/in/photostream/
  • DTD and schema define the buckets; the list of tags in the tag library (we’ll see later) is defined here. Move to schema is coming; more flexible; not something you need to know right away http://www.flickr.com/photos/linneberg/4481309196/sizes/m/in/photostream/
  • http://www.archivists.org/glossary/term_details.asp?DefinitionKey=66 http://www.flickr.com/photos/osuarchives/3427510628/sizes/m/in/photostream/
  • Encoding standards are rules for making the buckets; content standards are rules for the information inside
  • An EAD-encoded finding aid is split into info about institution/FA (metametadata) and info about materials (the finding aid)
  • http://findingaids.cjh.org/?pID=1165371 {here we will go through the first 200 lines or so Abelmann FA in the firefox or IE “view source” panel} How do we get HTML? Via XSLT – a transformation. In a bit more detail later.
  • Extremely unlikely you will be asked to type it all out by hand. Temples, programs, guidance.
  • Software is free (like kittens, not like beer) Designed by archivists: interface is intuitive Manages most common archival processes Designed for metadata standards Output – html, ead Built on a database (MySQL)
  • Web-based, but still need MySQL backend EAD import/export SAA archon webinar Sandbox on archon website: <http://www.archon.org/sandbox.php> Going to be combined with AT
  • Basic, powerful XML editor. You can safely ignore about 95% of the buttons and drop-downs, but will do things like suggest valid tags and attributes, close tags, and validate as you go. This is what we use.
  • Notetab Pro Text editor In conjunction with free downloads from EAD Cookbook Free, once installed reasonably friendly
  • https://code.google.com/p/eaditor/ More complex but powerful tool – works on native XML, not database (like AT/archon). For the pro implementor.
  • A simple text editor – OK for simple tinkering; hard to actually use.
  • http://www.loc.gov/ead/tglib/element_index.html
  • XSLT (Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations) is a declarative, XML-based language used for the transformation of XML documents. Here, the EAD tag processinfo is converted into HTML.
  • XSLT (Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations) is a declarative, XML-based language used for the transformation of XML documents. Here, the EAD tag processinfo is converted into HTML.
  • http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/online Hard to predict, but the data are structured so you can be flexible.
  • http://www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2010/2010-04.pdf
  • From SAA email blast
  • Links are in comments and in slides
  • A Brief Introduction to Encoded Archival Description

    1. 1.
    2. 2. Overview <ul><li>I. EAD Basics </li></ul><ul><li>II. Finding Aid </li></ul><ul><li>III. Implementation </li></ul><ul><li>IV. Resources </li></ul>
    3. 3. I. The Basics
    4. 4. What is EAD? <ul><li>XML standard for encoding finding aids </li></ul>I. Basics
    5. 5. <ul><li>XML standard for encoding finding aids </li></ul><ul><li>XML (eXtensible Markup Language): </li></ul><ul><li>set of rules for structuring data </li></ul>I. Basics - What is EAD?
    6. 6. <ul><li><item>2011</item> </li></ul><ul><li><container type=“box”>2011</container> </li></ul><ul><li><unitdate era=“CE”>2011</unitdate> </li></ul><ul><li>XML standard for encoding finding aids </li></ul>I. Basics - What is EAD?
    7. 7. <ul><li>Tag: </li></ul><ul><li><unitdate era=“ce”> 2011 </unitdate> </li></ul><ul><li>Attribute: </li></ul><ul><li><unitdate era=“ce” >2011</unitdate> </li></ul><ul><li>Element: </li></ul><ul><li><unitdate era=“ce”>2011</unitdate> </li></ul><ul><li>XML standard for encoding finding aids </li></ul>I. Basics - What is EAD?
    8. 8. <ul><li><ead> </li></ul><ul><li><eadheader> </li></ul><ul><li><titleproper>Guide to the Papers of Leo N. Tolstoy </li></ul><ul><li></titleproper> </li></ul><ul><li></eadheader> </li></ul><ul><li></ead> </li></ul><ul><li>XML standard for encoding finding aids </li></ul>I. Basics - What is EAD?
    9. 9. <ul><li>XML standard for encoding finding aids </li></ul><ul><li>Defined set of containers for descriptive data </li></ul><ul><li>Other encoding standards: </li></ul><ul><li>MARC (books) </li></ul><ul><li>Dublin Core (electronic objects) </li></ul>I. Basics - What is EAD?
    10. 10. <ul><li>XML standard for encoding finding aids </li></ul><ul><li>Valid elements, attributes and entities </li></ul><ul><li>are defined by a DTD or Schema </li></ul>I. Basics - What is EAD?
    11. 11. <ul><li>XML standard for encoding finding aids </li></ul><ul><li>A description of records that gives the repository physical and intellectual control over the materials and that assists users to gain access to and understand the materials (SAA) </li></ul>I. Basics - What is EAD?
    12. 12. <ul><li>XML standard for encoding finding aids </li></ul><ul><li>Describing Archives: </li></ul><ul><li>A Content Standard (DACS) </li></ul>I. Basics - What is EAD?
    13. 13. II. Finding Aid
    14. 14. EAD Finding Aid Structure <ul><li><ead> </li></ul><ul><li><eadheader>Information about repository and finding aid</eadheader> </li></ul><ul><li><archdesc>Description of archival materials</archdesc> </li></ul><ul><li></ead> </li></ul>II. Finding Aid
    15. 15. Guide to the Arthur Abelmann Collection II. Finding Aid
    16. 16. Questions? II. Finding Aid
    17. 17. III. Implementation
    18. 18. III. Implementation: Creating EAD
    19. 19. Archivists’ Toolkit III. Implementation: Creating EAD
    20. 20. Archon III. Implementation: Creating EAD
    21. 21. Oxygen III. Implementation: Creating EAD
    22. 22. NoteTab III. Implementation: Creating EAD
    23. 23. EADitor III. Implementation: Creating EAD
    24. 24. Notepad III. Implementation: Creating EAD
    25. 25. EAD Tag Library III. Implementation: Creating EAD
    26. 26. III. Implementation: Using EAD
    27. 27. Now What? III. Implementation: Using EAD
    28. 28. XSLT III. Implementation: Using EAD
    29. 29. XSLT III. Implementation: Using EAD
    30. 30. EAD to HTML III. Implementation: Using EAD
    31. 31. EAD to HTML with DC III. Implementation: Using EAD
    32. 32. EAD to HTML III. Implementation: Using EAD
    33. 33. EAD to PDF III. Implementation: Using EAD
    34. 34. EAD to MARC III. Implementation: Using EAD
    35. 35. Other Uses <ul><li>Bulk updates </li></ul><ul><li>EAD consortia </li></ul><ul><li>Metadata for digitized collections </li></ul><ul><li>Faceted searching </li></ul><ul><li>Anything structured data allows </li></ul>III. Implementation: Using EAD
    36. 36. IV. Resources
    37. 37. EAD Tools IV. Resources
    38. 38. Upcoming SAA Webinars <ul><li>July 7: Archivists’ Toolkit: Shortening the Path from Accession to Researcher </li></ul><ul><li>July 21: EAD Tips and Tricks: Repurposing EAD with XSLT </li></ul>IV. Resources
    39. 39. Tinker! <ul><li>EAD Cookbook </li></ul><ul><li>An XML Editor </li></ul><ul><li>Library of Congress EAD files </li></ul>IV. Resources
    40. 40. Download via Slideshare: http://www.slideshare.net/archivistkevin/a-brief-introduction-to-encoded-archival-description Twitter @archivistkevin Thank you!

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